MASONIC TEMPLES GO DARK…PI ANOS

​MASONIC LODGE PIANOS 


FREEMASON CHRONICLES (Pi-Ano is Pi anna of Luke 2 KJV) 

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O.E.S. Masonic Lodge- Zorah chapter

LUKE 2: (KJV BIBLE)

1 And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be taxed.

(And this taxing was first made when Cyrenius was governor of Syria.)

And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city.

And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem; (because he was of the house and lineage of David:)

To be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child.

And so it was, that, while they were there, the days were accomplished that she should be delivered.

And she brought forth her firstborn son, and wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger; because there was no room for them in the inn.

And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night.

And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid.

10 And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.

11 For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.

12 And this shall be a sign unto you; Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.

13 And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying,

14 Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.

15 And it came to pass, as the angels were gone away from them into heaven, the shepherds said one to another, Let us now go even unto Bethlehem, and see this thing which is come to pass, which the Lord hath made known unto us.

16 And they came with haste, and found Mary, and Joseph, and the babe lying in a manger.

17 And when they had seen it, they made known abroad the saying which was told them concerning this child.

18 And all they that heard it wondered at those things which were told them by the shepherds.

19 But Mary kept all these things, and pondered them in her heart.

20 And the shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things that they had heard and seen, as it was told unto them.

21 And when eight days were accomplished for the circumcising of the child, his name was called Jesus, which was so named of the angel before he was conceived in the womb.

22 And when the days of her purification according to the law of Moses were accomplished, they brought him to Jerusalem, to present him to the Lord;

23 (As it is written in the law of the Lord, Every male that openeth the womb shall be called holy to the Lord;)

24 And to offer a sacrifice according to that which is said in the law of the Lord, A pair of turtledoves, or two young pigeons.

25 And, behold, there was a man in Jerusalem, whose name was Simeon; and the same man was just and devout, waiting for the consolation of Israel: and the Holy Ghost was upon him.

26 And it was revealed unto him by the Holy Ghost, that he should not see death, before he had seen the Lord’s Christ.

27 And he came by the Spirit into the temple: and when the parents brought in the child Jesus, to do for him after the custom of the law,

28 Then took he him up in his arms, and blessed God, and said,

29 Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace, according to thy word:

30 For mine eyes have seen thy salvation,

31 Which thou hast prepared before the face of all people;

32 A light to lighten the Gentiles, and the glory of thy people Israel.

33 And Joseph and his mother marvelled at those things which were spoken of him.

34 And Simeon blessed them, and said unto Mary his mother, Behold, this child is set for the fall and rising again of many in Israel; and for a sign which shall be spoken against;

35 (Yea, a sword shall pierce through thy own soul also,) that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed.

36 And there was one Anna, a prophetess, the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Aser: she was of a great age, and had lived with an husband seven years from her virginity;

37 And she was a widow of about fourscore and four years, which departed not from the temple, but served God with fastings and prayers night and day.

38 And she coming in that instant gave thanks likewise unto the Lord, and spake of him to all them that looked for redemption in Jerusalem.

39 And when they had performed all things according to the law of the Lord, they returned into Galilee, to their own city Nazareth.

40 And the child grew, and waxed strong in spirit, filled with wisdom: and the grace of God was upon him.

41 Now his parents went to Jerusalem every year at the feast of the passover.

42 And when he was twelve years old, they went up to Jerusalem after the custom of the feast.

43 And when they had fulfilled the days, as they returned, the child Jesus tarried behind in Jerusalem; and Joseph and his mother knew not of it.

44 But they, supposing him to have been in the company, went a day’s journey; and they sought him among their kinsfolk and acquaintance.

45 And when they found him not, they turned back again to Jerusalem, seeking him.

46 And it came to pass, that after three days they found him in the temple, sitting in the midst of the doctors, both hearing them, and asking them questions.

47 And all that heard him were astonished at his understanding and answers.

48 And when they saw him, they were amazed: and his mother said unto him, Son, why hast thou thus dealt with us? behold, thy father and I have sought thee sorrowing.

49 And he said unto them, How is it that ye sought me? wist ye not that I must be about my Father’s business?

50 And they understood not the saying which he spake unto them.

51 And he went down with them, and came to Nazareth, and was subject unto them: but his mother kept all these sayings in her heart.

52 And Jesus increased in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God and man.

Mason song https://youtu.be/LZPzKl7rBYY

The Masonic term “go dark” means that a lodge ceases to operate as a lodge.

When a lodge “goes dark” or is said to have “gone dark”; it either:

1.  Ceases to exist as a lodge (permanently closes its doors),…or


2.  “Went dark” and ceased to have Stated Meetings for an agreed upon
     period of time:

     A.  This occurs in farming communities wherein when a large number
         of the lodge’s members are farmers and must tend to their crops
         during the Summer; it is agreed that the lodge should  “go dark”
         (no meetings) until Fall when their crops have been harvested. 

         This also applies to other trades and livelihoods such as if a
         large number of the lodge’s members are fishermen and are at
         sea for periods of time or military lodges whose members are
         deployed.

     B.  Some lodges “go dark” for a period of time each year.  Some
         lodges choose not to “go dark” during any period of time during
         the year.  And, some lodges “go dark” (do not have Stated
         Meetings, especially during the Summer) and members are
         delegated to tend to other Masonic duties such as:

          1.  Large job Lodge maintenance (cleaning, polishing or stripping
               of the lodge’s floors, painting, etc.)

          2.  Clean up and or mowing or trimming at Masonic cemeteries
               and widow’s homes; visiting the elderly or those in nursing
               homes and hospitals.


          3.  Highway cleanup, community partnerships, charitable acts,
               etc.

          4.  If the lodge offers a Masonic scholarship, the lodge’s
               delegated scholarship team contacts local area high school(s)
               and begins the application process for the next school year.
               Masonic scholarships are typically education scholarships
               offered by the lodge to qualifying high school students in their
               local community who wish to attend university.  Qualifications
               vary between lodges, but most are based on a student’s
               academic grades and their financial need.  There are no
               requirements placed upon the student to become a member
               of the lodge in the future. 
  


Here is what Albert Mackey, Freemason author and historian, said in his Revised Encyclopedia of Freemasonry (1929) page 262 about “Darkness”:

Darkness


“Darkness has, in all the systems of initiation, been deemed a symbol of ignorance, and so opposed to light, which is the symbol of knowledge.  Hence the rule, that the eye should not see until the heart has conceived the true nature of those beauties which constitute the mysteries of the Order. 

In the Ancient Mysteries, the aspirant (candidate) was always shrouded in darkness as a preparatory step to the reception of the full light of knowledge.  Among the Druids of Britain, the period was 9 days and nights; in the Grecian Mysteries, it was 3 times 9 days; while among the Persians, according to Porphyry, it was extended to the almost incredible period of 50 days of darkness, solitude and fasting. 

Because, according to all the cosmogonies, (the study of the origin of the universe) accounts of the universe, darkness existed before light was created, darkness was originally worshipped as the firstborn, as the progenitor of day and the state of existence before creation. 

The apostrophe of Young to Night embodies the feelings which gave origin to this debasing worship of darkness:

 

O majestic night!
Nature’s great ancestor!  Day’s elder born!
And fated to survive the transient sun!
By mortals and immortals seen with awe!

Freemasonry has restored darkness to its proper place as a state of preparation; the symbol of that antemundane (being or occurring before the creation of the world) chaos from whence light issued at the Divine command; of the state of nonentity before birth, and of ignorance before the reception of knowledge. 

Hence, in the Ancient Mysteries, the release of the aspirant (candidate) from solitude and darkness was called the act of regeneration, and he was said to be born again, or to be raised from the dead. 

And in Freemasonry, the darkness which envelops the mind of the uninitiated being removed by the bright effulgence of Masonic light, Freemasons are appropriately called the “sons of light.”

In Doctor Oliver’s Signs and Symbols, there is a lecture “On the Mysterious Darkness of the Third Degree.”  This refers to the ceremony of enveloping the room in darkness when that Degree is conferred – a ceremony once always observed, but now, in this country at least, (e.g.  United States), frequently but improperly omitted.  


The darkness here is a symbol of death, the lesson taught in the Degree, while the subsequent renewal of light refers to that other and subsequent lesson of eternal life.

Simon Sez:  Both Dr. Oliver (1782-1867) and Dr. Albert Mackey (1807-1881) were renowned Masonic historians and authors.  Dr. George Oliver lived in Lincolnshire, England.  Dr. Albert Mackey lived in Charleston, South Carolina.   

 

To “go dark” has no racial connotations, whatsoever, as it is well known that Freemasonry accepts as its members men of all different religions and races.

The term “go dark” does not have any satanic meaning of any kind as Freemasonry is based upon a belief in a Supreme Being.  In different languages around the world the Supreme Being is called such names as:  God, Yahweh, Jehovah, Allah, YHWH (as seen in the Torah and the Old Testament), Jehovah, Lord, King of Kings and many, many more, as found in the Holy Scriptures.  


Our lifelong quest of attaining more “light” refers to attaining mental illumination and journeying toward becoming a living representation of what the Supreme Being designed us to be upon his “trestleboard”, (the Holy Scriptures.)

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hoanalytic theory is the theory of personality organization and the dynamics of personality development that guides psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology. First laid out by Sigmund Freud in the late 19th century, psychoanalytic theory has undergone many refinements since his work. Psychoanalytic theory came to full prominence in the last third of the twentieth century as part of the flow of critical discourse regarding psychological treatments after the 1960s, long after Freud’s death in 1939,[1] and its validity is now widely disputed or rejected.[2][3] Freud had ceased his analysis of the brain and his physiological studies and shifted his focus to the study of the mind and the related psychological attributes making up the mind, and on treatment using free association and the phenomena of transference. His study emphasized the recognition of childhood events that could influence the mental functioning of adults. His examination of the genetic and then the developmental aspects gave the psychoanalytic theory its characteristics.[4] Starting with his publication of The Interpretation of Dreams in 1899, his theories began to gain prominence.

Terminology and definitionEdit

“Psychoanalytic and psychoanalytical are used in English. The latter is the older term, and at first simply meant ‘relating to the analysis of the human psyche’. But with the emergence of psychoanalysis as a distinct clinical practice, both terms came to describe that. Although both are still used, today, the normal adjective is psychoanalytic.[5]

Psychoanalysis is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary as

A therapeutic method, originated by Sigmund Freud, for treating mental disorders by investigating the interaction of conscious and unconscious elements in the patient’s mind and bringing repressed fears and conflicts into the conscious mind, using techniques such as dream interpretation and free association. Also: a system of psychological theory associated with this method.[6]

Through the scope of a psychoanalytic lens, humans are described as having sexual and aggressive drives. Psychoanalytic theorists believe that human behavior is deterministic. It is governed by irrational forces, and the unconscious, as well as instinctual and biological drives. Due to this deterministic nature, psychoanalytic theorists do not believe in free will.[7]

The beginningsEdit

Freud first began his studies on psychoanalysis and in collaboration with Dr. Josef Breuer, especially when it came to the study on Anna O. [8] The relationship between Freud and Breuer was a mix of admiration and competition, based on the fact that they were working together on the Anna O. case and must balance two different ideas as to her diagnosis and treatment. Today, Breuer can be considered the grandfather of psychoanalysis.[9] Anna O. was subject to both physical and psychological disturbances, such as not being able to drink out of fear.[10] Breuer and Freud both found that hypnosis was a great help in discovering more about Anna O. and her treatment. The research and ideas behind the study on Anna O. was highly referenced in Freud’s lectures on the origin and development of psychoanalysis.

These observations led Freud to theorize that the problems faced by hysterical patients could be associated to painful childhood experiences that could not be recalled. The influence of these lost memories shaped the feelings, thoughts and behaviours of patients. These studies contributed to the development of the psychoanalytic theory.[11]

Personality structureEdit

Sigmund Freud determined that the personality consists of three different elements, the id, the ego and the superego. The id is the aspect of personality that is driven by internal and basic drives and needs. These are typically instinctual, such as hunger, thirst, and the drive for sex, or libido. The id acts in accordance with the pleasure principle, in that it avoids pain and seeks pleasure. Due to the instinctual quality of the id, it is impulsive and often unaware of implications of actions. The ego is driven by reality principle. The ego works to balance both the id and superego. To balance these, it works to achieve the id’s drive in the most realistic ways. It seeks to rationalize the id’s instinct and please the drives that benefit the individual in the long term. It helps separate what is real, and realistic of our drives as well as being realistic about the standards that the superego sets for the individual. The superego is driven by morality principle. It acts in connection with the morality of higher thought and action. Instead of instinctively acting like the id, the superego works to act in socially acceptable ways. It employs morality, judging our sense of wrong and right and using guilt to encourage socially acceptable behavior.[7][12]

The unconsciousEdit

The unconscious is the portion of the mind of which a person is not aware. Freud said that it is the unconscious that exposes the true feelings, emotions, and thoughts of the individual. There are variety of psychoanalytic techniques used to access and understand the unconscious, ranging from methods like hypnosis, free association, dream analysis. Dreams allow us to explore the unconscious; according to Freud, they are “the ‘royal road’ to the unconscious”.[13] Dreams are composed of latent and manifest content. Whereas latent content is the underlying meaning of a dream that may not be remembered when a person wakes up, manifest content is the content from the dream that a person remembers upon waking and can be analyzed by a psychoanalytic psychologist. Exploring and understanding the manifest content of dreams can inform the individual of complexes or disorders that may be under the surface of their personality. Dreams can provide access to the unconscious that is not easily accessible.[14]

Freudian slips (also known as parapraxes) occur when the ego and superego do not work properly, exposing the id and internal drives or wants. They are considered mistakes revealing the unconscious. Examples range from calling someone by the wrong name, misinterpreting a spoken or written word, or simply saying the wrong thing.[15]

Defense mechanismsEdit

The ego balances the id, superego, and reality to maintain a healthy state of consciousness. It thus reacts to protect the individual from any stressors and anxiety by distorting reality. This prevents threatening unconscious thoughts and material from entering the consciousness. The different types of defense mechanisms are: Repressionreaction formationdenialprojectiondisplacementsublimationregression, and rationalization.[16]

Psychology theoriesEdit

Psychosexual developmentEdit

Freud’s take on the development of the personality (psyche). It is a stage theory that believes progress occurs through stages as the libido is directed to different body parts. The different stages, listed in order of progression, are: Oral, Anal, Phallic (Oedipus complex), Latency, Genital. The Genital stage is achieved if people meet all their needs throughout the other stages with enough available sexual energy. Individuals who don’t have their needs met in a given stage become fixated, or “stuck” in that stage.

Neo-analytic theoryEdit

Freud’s theory and work with psychosexual development lead to Neo-Analytic/ Neo-Freudians who also believed in the importance of the unconscious, dream interpretations, defense mechanisms and the integral influence childhood experiences but had objections to the theory as well. They do not support the idea that development of the personality stops at age 6, instead they believed development spreads across the lifespan. They extended Freud’s work and encompassed more influence from the environment and the importance of conscious thought along with the unconscious. The most important theorists are Erik Erikson (Psychosocial Development), Anna FreudCarl JungAlfred Adler and Karen Horney, and including the school of object relations.

Critics of psychoanalytic theoryEdit

The psychoanalytic approach has a variety of advantages and limitations that have spurred further research and expansion into the realm of personality development.

AdvantagesEdit

  • The theory emphasizes the importance of childhood experiences.
  • It initiated and addressed the importance of the unconscious, sexual and aggressive drives that make up the majority of all human beings’ personalities.[17]
  • The approach also explains defense mechanisms and why every individual reacts differently to similar situations.

LimitsEdit

  • Sigmund Freud failed to include evidence of the impact of the environment on the individual throughout his theory.
  • The theory is lacking in empirical data and too focused on pathology.[18]
  • This theory lacks consideration of culture and its influence on personality.[19][20]

Psychoanalysis and aestheticsEdit

Psychoanalytic theory is a major influence in Continental philosophy and in aesthetics in particular. Freud is considered a philosopher in some areas, and other philosophers, such as Jacques LacanMichel Foucault, and Jacques Derrida have written extensively on how psychoanalysis informs philosophical analysis.[21][22][23][24]

Psychoanalysis and literatureEdit

When analysing literary texts, the psychoanalytic theory could be utilized to decipher or interpret the concealed meaning within a text, or to better understand the author’s intentions. Through the analysis of motives, Freud’s theory can be used to help clarify the meaning of the writing as well as the actions of the characters within the text.[25]

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NARCISSISTS/NARCISSISM

Psychoanalytic theory is the theory of personality organization and the dynamics of personality development that guides psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology. First laid out by Sigmund Freud in the late 19th century, psychoanalytic theory has undergone many refinements since his work. Psychoanalytic theory came to full prominence in the last third of the twentieth century as part of the flow of critical discourse regarding psychological treatments after the 1960s, long after Freud’s death in 1939,[1] and its validity is now widely disputed or rejected.[2][3] Freud had ceased his analysis of the brain and his physiological studies and shifted his focus to the study of the mind and the related psychological attributes making up the mind, and on treatment using free association and the phenomena of transference. His study emphasized the recognition of childhood events that could influence the mental functioning of adults. His examination of the genetic and then the developmental aspects gave the psychoanalytic theory its characteristics.[4] Starting with his publication of The Interpretation of Dreams in 1899, his theories began to gain prominence.

Terminology and definitionEdit

“Psychoanalytic and psychoanalytical are used in English. The latter is the older term, and at first simply meant ‘relating to the analysis of the human psyche’. But with the emergence of psychoanalysis as a distinct clinical practice, both terms came to describe that. Although both are still used, today, the normal adjective is psychoanalytic.[5]

Psychoanalysis is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary as

A therapeutic method, originated by Sigmund Freud, for treating mental disorders by investigating the interaction of conscious and unconscious elements in the patient’s mind and bringing repressed fears and conflicts into the conscious mind, using techniques such as dream interpretation and free association. Also: a system of psychological theory associated with this method.[6]

Through the scope of a psychoanalytic lens, humans are described as having sexual and aggressive drives. Psychoanalytic theorists believe that human behavior is deterministic. It is governed by irrational forces, and the unconscious, as well as instinctual and biological drives. Due to this deterministic nature, psychoanalytic theorists do not believe in free will.[7]

The beginningsEdit

Freud first began his studies on psychoanalysis and in collaboration with Dr. Josef Breuer, especially when it came to the study on Anna O. [8] The relationship between Freud and Breuer was a mix of admiration and competition, based on the fact that they were working together on the Anna O. case and must balance two different ideas as to her diagnosis and treatment. Today, Breuer can be considered the grandfather of psychoanalysis.[9] Anna O. was subject to both physical and psychological disturbances, such as not being able to drink out of fear.[10] Breuer and Freud both found that hypnosis was a great help in discovering more about Anna O. and her treatment. The research and ideas behind the study on Anna O. was highly referenced in Freud’s lectures on the origin and development of psychoanalysis.

These observations led Freud to theorize that the problems faced by hysterical patients could be associated to painful childhood experiences that could not be recalled. The influence of these lost memories shaped the feelings, thoughts and behaviours of patients. These studies contributed to the development of the psychoanalytic theory.[11]

Personality structureEdit

Sigmund Freud determined that the personality consists of three different elements, the id, the ego and the superego. The id is the aspect of personality that is driven by internal and basic drives and needs. These are typically instinctual, such as hunger, thirst, and the drive for sex, or libido. The id acts in accordance with the pleasure principle, in that it avoids pain and seeks pleasure. Due to the instinctual quality of the id, it is impulsive and often unaware of implications of actions. The ego is driven by reality principle. The ego works to balance both the id and superego. To balance these, it works to achieve the id’s drive in the most realistic ways. It seeks to rationalize the id’s instinct and please the drives that benefit the individual in the long term. It helps separate what is real, and realistic of our drives as well as being realistic about the standards that the superego sets for the individual. The superego is driven by morality principle. It acts in connection with the morality of higher thought and action. Instead of instinctively acting like the id, the superego works to act in socially acceptable ways. It employs morality, judging our sense of wrong and right and using guilt to encourage socially acceptable behavior.[7][12]

The unconsciousEdit

The unconscious is the portion of the mind of which a person is not aware. Freud said that it is the unconscious that exposes the true feelings, emotions, and thoughts of the individual. There are variety of psychoanalytic techniques used to access and understand the unconscious, ranging from methods like hypnosis, free association, dream analysis. Dreams allow us to explore the unconscious; according to Freud, they are “the ‘royal road’ to the unconscious”.[13] Dreams are composed of latent and manifest content. Whereas latent content is the underlying meaning of a dream that may not be remembered when a person wakes up, manifest content is the content from the dream that a person remembers upon waking and can be analyzed by a psychoanalytic psychologist. Exploring and understanding the manifest content of dreams can inform the individual of complexes or disorders that may be under the surface of their personality. Dreams can provide access to the unconscious that is not easily accessible.[14]

Freudian slips (also known as parapraxes) occur when the ego and superego do not work properly, exposing the id and internal drives or wants. They are considered mistakes revealing the unconscious. Examples range from calling someone by the wrong name, misinterpreting a spoken or written word, or simply saying the wrong thing.[15]

Defense mechanismsEdit

The ego balances the id, superego, and reality to maintain a healthy state of consciousness. It thus reacts to protect the individual from any stressors and anxiety by distorting reality. This prevents threatening unconscious thoughts and material from entering the consciousness. The different types of defense mechanisms are: Repressionreaction formationdenialprojectiondisplacementsublimationregression, and rationalization.[16]

Psychology theoriesEdit

Psychosexual developmentEdit

Freud’s take on the development of the personality (psyche). It is a stage theory that believes progress occurs through stages as the libido is directed to different body parts. The different stages, listed in order of progression, are: Oral, Anal, Phallic (Oedipus complex), Latency, Genital. The Genital stage is achieved if people meet all their needs throughout the other stages with enough available sexual energy. Individuals who don’t have their needs met in a given stage become fixated, or “stuck” in that stage.

Neo-analytic theoryEdit

Freud’s theory and work with psychosexual development lead to Neo-Analytic/ Neo-Freudians who also believed in the importance of the unconscious, dream interpretations, defense mechanisms and the integral influence childhood experiences but had objections to the theory as well. They do not support the idea that development of the personality stops at age 6, instead they believed development spreads across the lifespan. They extended Freud’s work and encompassed more influence from the environment and the importance of conscious thought along with the unconscious. The most important theorists are Erik Erikson (Psychosocial Development), Anna FreudCarl JungAlfred Adler and Karen Horney, and including the school of object relations.

Critics of psychoanalytic theoryEdit

The psychoanalytic approach has a variety of advantages and limitations that have spurred further research and expansion into the realm of personality development.

AdvantagesEdit

  • The theory emphasizes the importance of childhood experiences.
  • It initiated and addressed the importance of the unconscious, sexual and aggressive drives that make up the majority of all human beings’ personalities.[17]
  • The approach also explains defense mechanisms and why every individual reacts differently to similar situations.

LimitsEdit

  • Sigmund Freud failed to include evidence of the impact of the environment on the individual throughout his theory.
  • The theory is lacking in empirical data and too focused on pathology.[18]
  • This theory lacks consideration of culture and its influence on personality.[19][20]

Psychoanalysis and aestheticsEdit

Psychoanalytic theory is a major influence in Continental philosophy and in aesthetics in particular. Freud is considered a philosopher in some areas, and other philosophers, such as Jacques LacanMichel Foucault, and Jacques Derrida have written extensively on how psychoanalysis informs philosophical analysis.[21][22][23][24]

Psychoanalysis and literatureEdit

When analysing literary texts, the psychoanalytic theory could be utilized to decipher or interpret the concealed meaning within a text, or to better understand the author’s intentions. Through the analysis of motives, Freud’s theory can be used to help clarify the meaning of the writing as well as the actions of the characters within the text.[25]