Monthly Archives: August 2014

SERPENT CIRCLE (7)

READ SERPENT CIRCLE DESKTOP

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GODRULEZ PAGAN

Santa? Flying spaghetti monster?
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Are u sure ur seeing what u think ur seeing?
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IS YOUR GOD ANY DIFFERENT?

LUKE 22:19 And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.

1 CORINTHIANS 11:24-25 And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me.

After the same manner also

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he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, this cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me.

Do this in remembrance of me with song
PASSION OF THE CHRIST

SAM HARRIS (flesh eating cannibles are elvis pancake eaters)

VATICAN MITHRAISM

Flesh? Human flesh eating cannibalism? Sound familiar?

Pythons are cannibals. By devouring another snake like itself, its metabilism is 7x increased

CANNIBLE PYTHONS

Santa?

Aliearia

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SHUTTER ISLAND

“Shutter Island” starts working on us with the first musical notes under the Paramount logo’s mountain, even before the film starts. They’re ominous and doomy. So is the film. This is Martin Scorsese’s evocation of the delicious shuddering fear we feel when horror movies are about something and don’t release all the tension with action scenes.

In its own way it’s a haunted house movie, or make that a haunted castle or fortress. Shutter Island, we’re told, is a remote and craggy island off Boston, where a Civil War-era fort has been adapted as a prison for the criminally insane. We approach it by boat through lowering skies, and the feeling is something like the approach to King Kong’s island: Looming in gloom from the sea, it fills the visitor with dread. To this island travel U.S. marshal Teddy Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his partner Chuck Aule (Mark Ruffalo).

It’s 1954, and they are assigned to investigate the disappearance of a child murderer (Emily Mortimer). There seems to be no way to leave the island alive. The disappearance of one prisoner might not require the presence of two marshals unfamiliar with the situation, but we never ask that question. Not after the ominous walls of the prison arise. Not after the visitors are shown into the office of the prison medical director, Dr. Cawley, played by Ben Kingsley with that forbidding charm he has mastered.

It’s clear that Teddy has no idea what he’s getting himself into. Teddy — such an innocuous name in such a gothic setting. Scorsese, working from a novel by Dennis Lehane, seems to be telling a simple enough story here; the woman is missing, and Teddy and Chuck will look for her. But the cold, gray walls clamp in on them, and the offices of Cawley and his colleagues, furnished for the Civil War commanding officers, seem borrowed from a tale by Edgar Allan Poe.

Scorsese the craftsman chips away at reality piece by piece. Flashbacks suggest Teddy’s traumas in the decade since World War II. That war, its prologue and aftermath, supplied the dark undercurrent of classic film noir. The term “post-traumatic shock syndrome” was not then in use, but its symptoms could be seen in men attempting to look confident in their facades of unstyled suits, subdued ties, heavy smoking and fedoras pulled low against the rain. DiCaprio and Ruffalo both affect this look, but DiCaprio makes it seem more like a hopeful disguise.

The film’s primary effect is on the senses. Everything is brought together into a disturbing foreshadow of dreadful secrets. How did this woman escape from a locked cell in a locked ward in the old fort, its walls thick enough to withstand cannon fire? Why do Cawley and his sinister colleague Dr. Naehring (Max Von Sydow, ready to play chess with Death) seem to be concealing something? Why is even such a pleasant person as the deputy warden not quite convincingly friendly? (He’s played by John Carroll Lynch, Marge’s husband in “Fargo,” so you can sense how nice he should be.) Why do the methods in the prison trigger flashbacks to Teddy’s memories of helping to liberate a Nazi death camp?

These kinds of questions are at the heart of film noir. The hero is always flawed. Scorsese showed his actors the great 1947 noir “Out of the Past,” whose very title is a noir theme: Characters never arrive at a story without baggage. They have unsettled issues, buried traumas. So, yes, perhaps Teddy isn’t simply a clean-cut G-man. But why are the others so strange? Kingsley in particular exudes menace every time he smiles.

There are thrilling visuals in “Shutter Island.” Another film Scorsese showed his cast was Hitchcock’s “Vertigo,” and we sense echoes of its hero’s fear of heights. There’s the possibility that the escaped woman might be lurking in a cave on a cliff, or hiding in a lighthouse. Both involve hazardous terrain to negotiate, above vertiginous falls to waves pounding on the rocks below. A possible hurricane is approaching. Light leaks out of the sky. The wind sounds mournful. It is, as they say, a dark and stormy night. And that’s what the movie is about: atmosphere, ominous portents, the erosion of Teddy’s confidence and even his identity. It’s all done with flawless directorial command. Scorsese has fear to evoke, and he does it with many notes.

You may read reviews of “Shutter Island” complaining that the ending blindsides you. The uncertainty it causes prevents the film from feeling perfect on first viewing. I have a feeling it might improve on second. Some may believe it doesn’t make sense. Or that, if it does, then the movie leading up to it doesn’t. I asked myself: OK, then, how should it end? What would be more satisfactory? Why can’t I be one of those critics who informs the director what he should have done instead?

Oh, I’ve had moments like that. Every moviegoer does. But not with “Shutter Island.” This movie is all of a piece, even the parts that don’t appear to fit. There is a human tendency to note carefully what goes before, and draw logical conclusions. But –what if you can’t nail down exactly what went before? What if there were things about Cawley and his peculiar staff that were hidden? What if the movie lacks a reliable narrator? What if its point of view isn’t omniscient but fragmented? Where can it all lead? What does it mean? We ask, and Teddy asks, too.

Aliearia

Pi & The MATHMATICAL UNIVERSE

Binary Code

Binary stars

MATHMATICAL UNIVERSE

The symbol for Pi:
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1 KINGS 7:23-26 1 Kings 7:23-26 King James Version (KJV)

And he made a molten sea, ten cubits from the one brim to the other: it was round all about, and his height was five cubits: and a line of thirty cubits did compass it round about.

And under the brim of it round about there were knops compassing it, ten in a cubit, compassing the sea round about: the knops were cast in two rows, when it was cast.

It stood upon twelve oxen, three looking toward the north, and three looking toward the west, and three looking toward the south, and three looking toward the east: and the sea was set above upon them, and all their hinder parts were inward.

And it was an hand breadth thick, and the brim thereof was wrought like the brim of a cup, with flowers of lilies: it contained two thousand baths.

NET Bible
He also made the big bronze basin called “The Sea.” It measured 15 feet from rim to rim, was circular in shape, and stood seven and one-half feet high. Its circumference was 45 feet.

GOD’S WORD® Translation Huram made a pool from cast metal. It was 15 feet in diameter. It was round, 7 1/2 feet high, and had a circumference of 45 feet.
——————
See pc faves The Bible Says pi
Or…read here…
Website
ORIGINAL BIBLE TRUTH

Bowl? 7 bowls?
REVELATION 16:

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REVELATION 16 (7 bowls=7 angels=Big Dipper=end of days 7 bowls REVELATION 1:20-21)
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===========
The 7 bowls are the 7 stars (Pleiades)
The 7 stats are the 7 angels
( Pleiades)
The 7 stars are the 7 angels with the 7 bowls who are the symbols of the 7 seals (Pleiades)
The 7 candles are the 7 stars with the 7 bowls who are the 7 churches both here on Earth AND IN HEAVEN..MIRROR IMAGES (Pleiades)

XXXXX

SEEKETH HE THAT MAKE THE 7 STARS AND ORION
MIRROR IMAGES
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MIRROR IMAGES
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Davinci Code Blade/Chalice blended as 1
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Sara=Sarah, Abram=Abraham/2 names

When the stone was found rolled away at the resurrection, wasnt it a symbol of becoming the complete, updated, original, whole being? Symbols are a language

Genesis 11: symbols=language

Again, I ask you…wasnt there a TRANSFIGURATION OF THE MAN+SPIRIT when the stone was rolled away? The stone may seem worthless to most, but it symbolizes a priceless revelation, according to ALL CIVILIZATIONS…

REVELATION 2:17 He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit saith unto the churches; To him that overcometh will I give to eat of the hidden manna, and will give him a white stone, and in the stone a new name written, which no man knoweth saving he that receiveth it.

Wait, THE 7 secret churches?
REVELATION 1:20 The mystery of the seven stars which thou sawest in my right hand, and the seven golden candlesticks. The seven stars are the angels of the seven churches: and the seven candlesticks which thou sawest are the seven churches.

A NEW NAME (secret name) hidden in a secret white stone)
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ISAIAH 46:
9 Remember the former things of old: for I am God, and there is none else; I am God, and there is none like me,
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ISAIAH 46: 10 Declaring the end from the beginning, and from ancient times the things that are not yet done, saying, My counsel shall stand, and I will do all my pleasure:

ISAIAH 46:11 Calling a ravenous bird from the east, the man that executeth my counsel from a far country: yea, I have spoken it, I will also bring it to pass; I have purposed it, I will also do it.

Gen 15 skeptik

So, we have 7 stars, birds, taurus (bull/calf etc)
Gen 13:14-18

Gen 15:

7 (righteous #)
Starseeds (Abrahams seeds)

GEN 11: skeptik scattered NSEW

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Ziggurat

PYRAMID ZIG PIC

The ancients have something to say, through temples (books) in stone. The pyramids are designed to reveal the bride (7 starseeds Pleiades, 7 women)+1 man=groom, nimrod, orion material builders symbols scattered NSEW

The return of the roghteous starseed stuff is marked bythe revealing of advanced math incorporated into the design of the most sacred alters, yemples, pyramis, ziggurats and stone records around the world

PARTHENON NOVA

Image? Imagination

Nimrod nation

Gen 11 image

Gen 1:26

The designers of the illusion revealers also built this

Temple Artemis

Who is Artemis? A moon goddess, opposite sun (sun=masculine=Sun/son)day
Moon (feminine)moon/monday)
Hence=bridegroom

Amos 5:7

Artemis=aka wormwood (bitter tasting medicine) stone (meteor) aka Roman=Diana

Artemis killed orion

Amos 5:7-8

The same designers built the Parthenon (marble=illusion=pi=golden reed/measure/ratio) as we see buuilt into architectural sacred structures around the world

Ziggurat (morter, slime=language vid..
Gen 11 skeptik

Pyrmids no morter, or parthenon

The language of the messengers, hosts:

GEN 2: 1-7 hosts were the co-creators of hu-mans

Gen 1:26 image/image-i-NATION

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1st NATIONS

GEN 10:8-12 giant/hunter=Orion

Where did the first material builder go? Nowhere, Satan/nimrod, orion has always been the hosts on earth NSEW

JOB 1:-NSEW

The orb+pyramid symbols are seen in the design of the ziggurat

Zig pyramid

Davinci blade/chalice

Gen 13: 1st zig was built 2nd Alter aligned w the Lord (gen 13:18)

Starseeds alter, NSEW promised to those remembering, deciphering

Rev 1:20

Davinci C
1. Shes a cryptologist
2. Davonci C rose line

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Remembering solomons ring, symboling solomon reigning over satan/nimrod/orion material building giant, hunter, as the divine design reveals solomons/Abrahams knowledge of the balance of ALL things=
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Bride/groom
Moon/sun
Spirit/material
Up/down (to/fro=North/south..east/west)
Above/below
Light dark
Heaven/earth
2 names
Feminine/masculine

Zig pyramids ascend, descend
Orb zig
Orb pope
Orb olympics

What happened to the orb on zig

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Fish

Fish tad

Olympics

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SOCHI OLYMPICS OPENING/THE WIRE WEBSITE

Bride/groom iceskaters (hoary frost)

Isaiah 4:1-2
Do u see pyramids? Doesnt pyramids align w 7 stars n orion?

Amos 5:8

Rev 1:20

Horse messengers (who is Orions skydaddy?
Poseidon, god of horses, chariots, sea god, son=1 man aka Nimrod (orion)

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Nothin more American than….
APPLE…

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Pi…

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Mayans=serpent, step temple, blood moon

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THE NUMERICS OF CREATION AS THE STORIES IN THE BIBLE
NUMERICS/Pi/Secret Knowledge

Aliearia

FROM A SHEEPLE INTO THE AWAKENED

Take a lil journey through time. This is where u learn ur origins and how u are truely THE AWAKENING SHEEPLE who are still considered a consuming bacteria to the elite.

Take a good long look at these elite rulers and then tell me something…WHAT THE HELL IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THEM? Lets begin at the beginning…Nimrod aka ORION…
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GENESIS 10:8-12
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GEN 11 bible
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GEN 11 skeptik
Min 00:29=
GIANT T?
TT=pi

TTTTTTTTTTTTT
——————–
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Scattered? Symbols=language?

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GENESIS 11:ziggurat
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THE SHEEPLE MILITARY IS STANDING UP TO THE ELITE AS….THE AWAKENED ONES

THE VACCINE AGAINST MAGIC IS WEARING OFF

Aliearia

SYNESTHESIA

Search Wikipedia
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How someone with synesthesia might perceive (not “see”) certain letters and numbers. Synesthetes see characters just as others do (in whichever color actually displayed), yet simultaneously perceive colors as associated to each one.

Synesthesia (also spelled synæsthesia or synaesthesia; from the Ancient Greek σύν syn, “together”, and α σθησις aisthēsis, “sensation”) is a neurological phenomenon in which stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to automatic, involuntary experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway. [1][2][3][4] People who report such experiences are known as synesthetes.

Difficulties have been recognized in adequately defining synesthesia: [5][6]

many different phenomena have been included in the term synesthesia (“union of the senses”), and in many cases the terminology seems to be inaccurate. A more accurate term may be ideasthesia.

In one common form of synesthesia, known as grapheme → color synesthesia or color-graphemic synesthesia, letters or numbers are perceived as inherently colored. [7][8] In spatial-sequence, or number form synesthesia, numbers, months of the year, and/or days of the week elicit precise locations in space (for example, 1980 may be “farther away” than 1990), or may appear as a three-dimensional map (clockwise or counterclockwise). [9][10]

Only a fraction of types of synesthesia have been evaluated by scientific research. [11] Awareness of synesthetic perceptions varies from person to person. [12]

Although synesthesia was the topic of intensive scientific investigation in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, it was largely abandoned by scientific research in the mid-20th century. [13]

Psychological research has demonstrated that synesthetic experiences can have measurable behavioral consequences, and functional neuroimaging studies have identified differences in patterns of brain activation. [8] Many find that synesthesia aids the creative process. [citation needed] Psychologists and neuroscientists study synesthesia not only for its inherent appeal, but also for the insights it may give into cognitive and perceptual processes that occur in synesthetes and non-synesthetes alike.

Some synesthetes often report that they were unaware their experiences were unusual until they realized other people did not have them, while others report feeling as if they had been keeping a secret their entire lives. [11] The automatic and ineffable nature of a synesthetic experience means that the pairing may not seem out of the ordinary. This involuntary and consistent nature helps define synesthesia as a real experience. Most synesthetes report that their experiences are pleasant or neutral, although, in rare cases, synesthetes report that their experiences can lead to a degree of sensory overload. [14]

Though often stereotyped in the popular media as a medical condition or neurological aberration, many synesthetes themselves do not perceive their synesthetic experiences as a handicap. To the contrary, some report it as a gift—an additional “hidden” sense —something they would not want to miss. Most synesthetes become aware of their distinctive mode of perception in their childhood. Some have learned how to apply their ability in daily life and work. Synesthetes have used their abilities in memorization of names and telephone numbers, mental arithmetic, and more complex creative activities like producing visual art, music, and theater. [11]

Despite the commonalities which permit definition of the broad phenomenon of synesthesia, individual experiences vary in numerous ways. This variability was first noticed early in synesthesia research. [15] Some synesthetes report that vowels are more strongly colored, while for others consonants are more strongly colored. [14] Self reports, interviews, and autobiographical notes by synesthetes demonstrate a great degree of variety in types of synesthesia, intensity of synesthetic perceptions, awareness of the perceptual discrepancies between synesthetes and non-synesthetes, and the ways synesthesia is used in work, creative processes, and daily life. [11][16]

Synesthetes are very likely to participate in creative activities. [17] It has been suggested that individual development of perceptual and cognitive skills, in addition to one’s cultural environment, produces the variety in awareness and practical use of synesthetic phenomena [12][16]

Synesthesia can occur between nearly any two senses or perceptual modes, and at least one synesthete, Solomon Shereshevsky, experienced synesthesia that linked all five senses. [medical citation needed] Types of synesthesia are indicated by using the notation x → y, where x is the “inducer” or trigger experience, and y is the “concurrent” or additional experience. For example, perceiving letters and numbers (collectively called graphemes) as colored would be indicated as grapheme → color synesthesia. Similarly, when synesthetes see colors and movement as a result of hearing musical tones, it would be indicated as tone → (color, movement) synesthesia.

While nearly every logically possible combination of experiences can occur, several types are more common than others.

Grapheme-color synesthesia

Main article: Grapheme-color synesthesia

From Wednesday is Indigo Blue. [3]

Note this example’s upside-down clock face.

In one of the most common forms of synesthesia, individual letters of the alphabet and numbers (collectively referred to as graphemes) are “shaded” or “tinged” with a color. While different individuals usually do not report the same colors for all letters and numbers, studies with large numbers of synesthetes find some commonalities across letters (e.g. A is likely to be red). [14]

As a child, Pat Duffy told her father, “I realized that to make an R all I had to do was first write a P and draw a line down from its loop. And I was so surprised that I could turn a yellow letter into an orange letter just by adding a line.” Another grapheme synesthete says, “When I read, about five words around the exact one I’m reading are in color. It’s also the only way I can spell. In elementary school I remember knowing how to spell the word ‘priority’ [with an “i” rather than an “e”] because … an ‘e’ was out of place in that word because ‘e’s were yellow and didn’t fit.” [18]

Chromesthesia

Main article: Chromesthesia

Another common form of synesthesia is the association of sounds with colors. For some, everyday sounds such as doors opening, cars honking, or people talking can trigger seeing colors. For others, colors are triggered when musical notes and/or keys are being played. People with synesthesia related to music may also have perfect pitch because their ability to see/hear colors aids them in identifying notes or keys. [citation needed]

The colors triggered by certain sounds, and any other synesthetic visual experiences, are referred to as photisms.

According to Richard Cytowic, [3] sound → color synesthesia, or chromesthesia is “something like fireworks”: voice, music, and assorted environmental sounds such as clattering dishes or dog barks trigger color and firework shapes that arise, move around, and then fade when the sound ends. Sound often changes the perceived hue, brightness, scintillation, and directional movement. Some individuals see music on a “screen” in front of their faces. For Deni Simon, music produces waving lines “like oscilloscope configurations – lines moving in color, often metallic with height, width and, most importantly, depth. My favorite music has lines that extend horizontally beyond the ‘screen’ area.”

Individuals rarely agree on what color a given sound is. B flat might be orange for one person and blue for another. Composers Liszt and Rimsky-Korsakov famously disagreed on the colors of music keys. [citation needed]

Spatial sequence synesthesia

Those with spatial sequence synesthesia (SSS) tend to see numerical sequences as points in space. For instance, the number 1 might be farther away and the number 2 might be closer. People with SSS may have superior memories; in one study, they were able to recall past events and memories far better and in far greater detail than those without the condition. They also see months or dates in the space around them. Some people see time like a clock above and around them. [unreliable medical source?][19][20]

Number form

Main article: Number form

A number form from one of Francis Galton’s subjects. [9] Note how the first 12 digits correspond to a clock face.

A number form is a mental map of numbers that automatically and involuntarily appears whenever someone who experiences number forms thinks of numbers. Number forms were first documented and named by Francis Galton in “The Visions of Sane Persons”. [21]

Auditory-tactile synesthesia

In auditory → tactile synesthesia, certain sounds can induce sensations in parts of the body. Auditory → tactile synesthesia may originate from birth or be acquired sometime later in life. [citation needed] It is one of the rarest forms of synesthesia. [22]

Misophonia

Main article: Misophonia

Misophonia is a neurological disorder in which negative experiences (anger, flight, hatred, disgust) are triggered by specific sounds. Richard Cytowic suggests that misophonia is related to, or perhaps a variety of, synesthesia. [23]

Miren Edelstein and her colleagues have compared misophonia to synesthesia in terms of connectivity between different brain regions as well as specific symptoms. They formed the hypothesis that “a pathological distortion of connections between the auditory cortex and limbic structures could cause a form of sound-emotion synesthesia” [24]

Mirror-touch synesthesia

Main article: Mirror-touch synesthesia

This is a rare form of synesthesia where individuals literally feel the same sensation that another person feels (such as touch) [citation needed] . For instance, when such a synesthete observes someone being tapped on their shoulder, the synesthete involuntarily feels a tap on their own shoulder as well. People with this type of synesthesia have been shown to have higher empathy levels compared to the general population. This may be related to the so-called mirror neurons present in the motor areas of the brain, which have also been linked to empathy [citation needed] .

Lexical-gustatory synesthesia

Main article: Lexical-gustatory synesthesia

This is another rare form of synesthesia where certain tastes are experienced when hearing words. For example, the word basketball might taste like waffles. It is estimated that 0.2% of the population has this form of synesthesia [citation needed] .

Although often termed a “neurological condition,” synesthesia is not listed in either the DSM-IV or the ICD since it most often does not interfere with normal daily functioning. [medical citation needed] Indeed, most synesthetes report that their experiences are neutral or even pleasant. [14] Like perfect pitch, synesthesia is simply a difference in perceptual experience. [citation needed]

Reaction times for answers that are congruent with a synesthete’s automatic colors are faster than those whose answers are incongruent. [3]

The simplest approach is test-retest reliability over long periods of time, using stimuli of color names, color chips, or a computer-screen color picker providing 16.7 million choices. Synesthetes consistently score around 90% on reliability of associations, even with years between tests. [1] In contrast, non-synesthetes score just 30–40%, even with only a few weeks between tests and a warning that they would be retested. [1]

The automaticity of synesthetic experience. A synesthete might perceive the left panel like the panel on the right. [25]

Grapheme-color synesthetes, as a group, share significant preferences for the color of each letter (e.g. A tends to be red; O tends to be white or black; S tends to be yellow etc.) [14] Nonetheless, there is a great variety in types of synesthesia, and within each type, individuals report differing triggers for their sensations and differing intensities of experiences. This variety means that defining synesthesia in an individual is difficult, and the majority of synesthetes are completely unaware that their experiences have a name. [14]

Neurologist Richard Cytowic identifies the following diagnostic criteria for synesthesia in his first edition book. However, the criteria are different in the second book: [1][2][3]

1. Synesthesia is involuntary and automatic. 2. Synesthetic perceptions are spatially extended, meaning they often have a sense of “location.” For example, synesthetes speak of “looking at” or “going to” a particular place to attend to the experience. 3. Synesthetic percepts are consistent and generic (i.e. simple rather than pictorial). 4. Synesthesia is highly memorable. 5. Synesthesia is laden with affect.

Cytowic’s early cases mainly included individuals whose synesthesia was frankly projected outside the body (e.g. on a “screen” in front of one’s face). Later research showed that such stark externalization occurs in a minority of synesthetes. Refining this concept, Cytowic and Eagleman differentiated between “localizers” and “non-localizers” to distinguish those synesthetes whose perceptions have a definite sense of spatial quality from those whose perceptions do not. [3]

Main article: Neural basis of synesthesia

Regions thought to be cross-activated in grapheme-color synesthesia (green=grapheme recognition area, red=V4 color area). [25]

Dedicated regions of the brain are specialized for given functions. Increased cross-talk between regions specialized for different functions may account for the many types of synesthesia. For example, the additive experience of seeing color when looking at graphemes might be due to cross-activation of the grapheme-recognition area and the color area called V4 (see figure). [25] This is supported by the fact that grapheme-color synesthetes are able to identify the color of a grapheme in their peripheral vision even when they cannot consciously identify the shape of the grapheme. [25]

An alternate possibility is disinhibited feedback, or a reduction in the amount of inhibition along normally existing feedback pathways. [26] Normally, excitation and inhibition are balanced. However, if normal feedback were not inhibited as usual, then signals feeding back from late stages of multi-sensory processing might influence earlier stages such that tones could activate vision. Cytowic and Eagleman find support for the disinhibition idea in the so-called acquired forms [3] of synesthesia that occur in non-synesthetes under certain conditions: temporal lobe epilepsy, head trauma, stroke, and brain tumors. They also note that it can likewise occur during stages of meditation, deep concentration, sensory deprivation, or with use of psychedelics such as LSD or mescaline, and even, in some cases, marijuana. [3]

However, synesthetes report that common stimulants, like caffeine and cigarettes do not affect the strength of their synesthesia, nor does alcohol. [3]:137–40

Depending on the study, researchers have suggested 1 in 2,000 people have some form of synesthesia, while others have reported 1 in 300 or even as many as 1 in 23. One problem with statistics is that some individuals will not self-classify as they do not realize that their perceptions are different from those of everyone else. [25]

Grapheme-color, chromesthesia, or anything color-related, appear to be the most common forms of synesthesia. Some of the rarest are reported to be auditory-tactile, mirror-touch, and lexical-gustatory. [citation needed]

Main article: History of synesthesia research

The interest in colored hearing dates back to Greek antiquity, when philosophers asked if the color (chroia, what we now call timbre) of music was a quantifiable quality. [27] Isaac Newton proposed that musical tones and color tones shared common frequencies, as did Goethe in his book, “Theory of Color.” [citation needed] There is a long history of building color organs such as the clavier à lumières on which to perform colored music in concert halls. [28][28][29]

The first medical description of “colored hearing” is in an 1812 German thesis by the “father of psychophysics,” Gustav Fechner. [30] Fechner reported the first empirical survey of colored letter photisms among 73 synesthetes in 1876, [31][32] followed in the 1880s by Francis Galton. [9][33][34] Research into synesthesia proceeded briskly in several countries, but due to the difficulties in measuring subjective experiences and the rise of behaviorism, which made the study of any subjective experience taboo, synesthesia faded into scientific oblivion between 1930 and 1980.

As the 1980s cognitive revolution made inquiry into internal subjective states respectable again, scientists returned to synesthesia. Led in the United States by Larry Marks and Richard Cytowic, and later in England by Simon Baron-Cohen and Jeffrey Gray, researchers explored the reality, consistency, and frequency of synesthetic experiences. In the late 1990s, the focus settled on grapheme → color synesthesia, one of the most common [14] and easily studied types. Synesthesia is now the topic of scientific books and papers, Ph.D. theses, documentary films, and even novels.

Since the rise of the Internet in the 1990s, synesthetes began contacting one another and creating web sites devoted to the condition. These early grew into international organizations such as the American Synesthesia Association, the UK Synaesthesia Association, the Belgian Synaesthesia Association, the Canadian Synesthesia Association, the German Synesthesia Association, and the Netherlands Synesthesia Web Community.

Artistic investigations

Vision by Carol Steen; Oil on Paper; 15×12-3/4″ 1996. A representation of a synesthetic photism experienced during acupuncture.

Main article: Synesthesia in art

Synesthetic art historically refers to multi-sensory experiments in the genres of visual music, music visualization, audiovisual art, abstract film, and intermedia. [11][13][35][36][37][38]

Distinct from neuroscience, the concept of synesthesia in the arts is regarded as the simultaneous perception of multiple stimuli in one gestalt experience. [39]

Neurological synesthesia has been a source of inspiration for artists, composers, poets, novelists, and digital artists. Nabokov writes explicitly about synesthesia in several novels. [citation needed] Kandinsky (a synesthete) and Mondrian (not a synesthete) both experimented with image-music congruence in their paintings. Scriabin composed colored music that was deliberately contrived and based on the circle of fifths, whereas Messiaen invented a new method of composition (the modes of limited transposition) specifically to render his bi-directional sound-color synesthesia. For example, the red rocks of Bryce Canyon are depicted in his symphony Des canyons aux étoiles (“From the Canyons to the Stars”). New art movements such as literary symbolism, non-figurative art, and visual music have profited from experiments with synesthetic perception and contributed to the public awareness of synesthetic and multi-sensory ways of perceiving. [11]

Contemporary artists with synesthesia, such as Carol Steen [40] and Marcia Smilack [41] (a photographer who waits until she gets a synesthetic response from what she sees and then takes the picture), use their synesthesia to create their artwork. They demonstrate the complex interplay between personal experience and artistic creation.

Literary depictions

Main articles: Synesthesia in literature and Synesthesia in fiction

Synesthesia is sometimes used as a plot device or way of developing a character’s inner life. Author and synesthete Pat Duffy describes five ways in which synesthetic characters have been used in modern fiction. [42][43]

1. Synesthesia as Romantic ideal: in which the condition illustrates the Romantic ideal of transcending one’s experience of the world. Books in this category include The Gift by Vladimir Nabokov. 2. Synesthesia as pathology: in which the trait is pathological. Books in this category include The Whole World Over by Julia Glass. 3. Synesthesia as Romantic pathology: in which synesthesia is pathological but also provides an avenue to the Romantic ideal of transcending quotidian experience. Books in this category include Holly Payne’s The Sound of Blue. 4. Synesthesia as psychological health and balance: Painting Ruby Tuesday by Jane Yardley, and A Mango-Shaped Space by Wendy Mass. 5. Synesthesia as young adult literature and science fiction: Ultraviolet by R.J. Anderson

Many literary depictions of synesthesia are not accurate. Some say more about an author’s interpretation of synesthesia than the phenomenon itself. [citation needed]

Notable cases

Main article: List of people with synesthesia

Identifying synesthesia in the historical record is fraught with error unless (auto)biographical sources explicitly give convincing details.

There are many famous synesthetes, most of whom are artists, writers, or musicians. David Hockney perceives music as color, shape, and configuration and uses these perceptions when painting opera stage sets (though not while creating his other artworks). Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky combined four senses: color, hearing, touch, and smell. [1][3] Vladimir Nabokov described his grapheme-color synesthesia at length in his autobiography, Speak, Memory, and portrayed it in some of his characters. [44] Synesthetic composers include Duke Ellington, [45] Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, [46] and Olivier Messiaen, whose three types of complex colors are rendered explicitly in musical chord structures that he invented. [3][47] Physicist Richard Feynman describes his colored equations in his autobiography, What Do You Care What Other People Think? [48]

Other notable synesthetes include musicians Billy Joel, [49]:89, 91 Itzhak Perlman, [49]:53 Ida Maria, [50] Brian Chase [51][52] and Patrick Stump; actress Stephanie Carswell (credited as Stéphanie Montreux); inventor Nikola Tesla; [53] electronic musician Richard D. James aka Aphex Twin (who claims to be inspired by lucid dreams as well as music); and classical pianist Hélène Grimaud. Drummer Mickey Hart of The Grateful Dead wrote about his experiences with synaesthesia in his autobiography Drumming at the Edge of Magic. [citation needed] Pharrell Williams, of the groups The Neptunes and N.E.R.D., claims to experience synesthesia [54][55]

and used it as the basis of the album Seeing Sounds. Singer/songwriter Marina and the Diamonds experiences music → color synesthesia and reports colored days of the week. [56]

Some artists frequently mentioned as synesthetes did not, in fact, have the neurological condition. Alexander Scriabin’s 1911 Prometheus, for example, is a deliberate contrivance whose color choices are based on the circle of fifths and appear to have been taken from Madame Blavatsky. [3][57] The musical score has a separate staff marked luce whose “notes” are played on a color organ. Technical reviews appear in period volumes of Scientific American. [3] On the other hand, his older colleague Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (who was perceived as a fairly conservative composer) was, in fact, a synesthete. [58]

French poets Arthur Rimbaud and Charles Baudelaire wrote of synesthetic experiences, but there is no evidence they were synesthetes themselves. Baudelaire’s 1857 Correspondances introduced the notion that the senses can and should intermingle. Baudelaire participated in a hashish experiment by psychiatrist Jacques-Joseph Moreau and became interested in how the senses might affect each other. [11]

Rimbaud later wrote Voyelles (1871), which was perhaps more important than Correspondances in popularizing synesthesia. He later boasted “J’inventais la couleur des voyelles!” (I invented the colors of the vowels!). [citation needed]

Daniel Tammet wrote a book on his experiences with synesthesia called Born on a Blue Day. [59]

Joanne Harris, author of Chocolat, is a synesthete who says she experiences colors as scents. [60] Her novel Blueeyedboy features various aspects of synesthesia.

Tests like this demonstrate that people do not attach sounds to visual shapes arbitrarily. Which shape would you call “Bouba” and which “Kiki?”

Research on synesthesia raises questions about how the brain combines information from different sensory modalities, referred to as crossmodal perception or multisensory integration.

An example of this is the bouba/kiki effect. In an experiment first designed by Wolfgang Köhler, people are asked to choose which of two shapes is named bouba and which kiki. 95% to 98% of people choose kiki for the angular shape and bouba for the rounded one. Individuals on the island of Tenerife showed a similar preference between shapes called takete and maluma. Even 2.5 year-old children (too young to read) show this effect. [61] Recent research indicated that in the background of this effect may operate a form of ideasthesia. [62]

Researchers hope that the study of synesthesia will provide better understanding of consciousness and its neural correlates. In particular, synesthesia might be relevant to the philosophical problem of qualia, [4][63]

given that synesthetes experience extra qualia (e.g. colored sound). An important insight for qualia research may come from the findings that synesthesia has the properties of ideasthesia, [5] which then suggest a crucial role of conceptualization processes in generating qualia. [64]

Technological applications

Synesthesia also has a number of practical applications, one of which is the use of ‘intentional synesthesia’ in technology. [65]

Synesthesia and virtual reality

One type of application is the pain-reducing virtual reality program. [66] In existing programs, the main purpose is to reduce pain when undergoing a specific treatment by shifting the attention from the experienced pain to the virtual program in which the patient is participating. By using artificial synesthesia and combining various senses, this can help to enhance the control of a person’s attention, which can be used to improve and direct sensory distraction from the perceived pain.

For example, many treatments for burn pain and wounds may increase patients’ anxiety, which increases perceived pain. Shifting attention from pain and anxiety is therefore an important part of the treatment process. [67] Virtual reality has proven to be very effective in managing this acute pain in several medical settings by shifting patients’ attention from their experienced pain to the program in which they have been introduced. It appears to be far more effective than other distraction techniques, like playing video games. [68] More specifically, the convergence of many sense modalities (e.g. sound, sight, and touch) gives patients the perception of being immersed in the virtual environment, which helps them endure the pain while relying less on pharmacological therapy.

The vOICe

Peter Meijer developed a sensory substitution device called The vOICe (the capital letters “O,” “I,” and “C” in “vOICe” are intended to evoke the expression “Oh I see”). The vOICe is a privately owned research project, running without venture capital, that was first implemented using low-cost hardware in 1991. [69] The vOICe is a visual-to-auditory sensory substitution device (SSD) preserving visual detail at high resolution (up to 25,344 pixels). [70]

The device consists of a laptop, head-mounted camera or computer camera, and headphones. The vOICe converts visual stimuli of the surroundings captured by the camera into corresponding aural representations (soundscapes) delivered to the user through headphones at a default rate of one soundscape per second. Each soundscape is a left-to-right scan, with height represented by pitch, and brightness by loudness. [71] Default resolution of the soundscape is 176×64. Therefore, it is roughly comparable to a retinal implant or brain implant with 10,000 electrodes.

The process of converting greyscale camera images into soundscapes works according to three simple rules. The first is ‘left and right’ in which left-to-right scanning results in hearing the stereo pan from left to right correspondingly. If there is a visual pattern on the left, the user hears a sound on the left, and similarly for the right. The second rule is ‘up and down’: every scan provides a pitch that indicates elevation. The higher the position of the visual pattern, the higher the pitch. The third and final rule is ‘dark and light’: loudness corresponds to brightness. The louder the sound, the brighter the visual pattern. Silence indicates no light stimuli, the loudest sounds represent white light, and everything in between is a shade of grey.

For example, a straight bright line on a dark background, running from the top left to the bottom right, would sound like a tone steadily decreasing in pitch; a dot would sound like a short beep; and two dots would sound like two short beeps. Since real-life images are much more complex, there is also much more to hear through this device. While converting the visual pattern into a sound, the device uses a predictable real-time audio and video processing algorithm, allowing users to listen to and then interpret the visual information captured by a digital video camera. The vOICe compensates for the loss of vision by converting information from the lost sensory modality into stimuli in a remaining modality. [72]

This could lead to synthetic vision with truly visual sensations through crossmodal sensory integration through training and education. It requires a certain amount of time and effort to become proficient at differentiating objects, identifying objects, and locating them in space. Users are therefore advised to start training in a safe, familiar home environment in order to integrate the novel stimuli with other senses.

One of the remaining questions in this ongoing research concerning the vOICe is to what extent the use of a sensory substitution system can lead to visual sensations through forms of induced artificial synesthesia.

Eyeborg

The Eyeborg is a device developed by Adam Montandan that incorporates the auditory and visual spectra. It makes it possible for people with color-blindness to hear colors. This device was inspired by naturally occurring synesthesia. [73]

Allochiria Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response Fantasy prone personality Ideophone

Parosmia Sensory substitution Visual music The Yellow Sound

1. [page needed] Cytowic, Richard E. (2002). Synesthesia: A Union of the Senses (2nd edition). Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-03296-1. OCLC 49395033 . 2. [page needed] Cytowic, Richard E. (2003). The Man Who Tasted Shapes. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-53255-7. OCLC 53186027 . 3. [page needed] Cytowic, Richard E; Eagleman, David M (2009). Wednesday is Indigo Blue: Discovering the Brain of Synesthesia (with an afterword by Dmitri Nabokov). Cambridge: MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-01279-0. 4. [page needed] Harrison, John E.; Simon Baron-Cohen (1996). Synaesthesia: classic and contemporary readings. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. ISBN 0-631-19764-8. OCLC 59664610 . 5. Nikolić D (2009). “Is synaesthesia actually ideaesthesia? An inquiry into the nature of the phenomenon” . Proceedings of the Third International Congress on Synaesthesia, Science & Art, Granada, Spain, April 26–29. 6. Simner J (2012). “Defining synaesthesia”. British Journal of Psychology (Review) 103 (6): 1–15. doi:10.1348/000712610X528305 . PMID 22229768 . 7. Rich AN, Mattingley JB (January 2002). “Anomalous perception in synesthesia: a cognitive neuroscience perspective”. Nature Reviews Neuroscience (Review) 3 (1): 43–52. doi:10.1038/nrn702 . PMID 11823804 . 8. Hubbard EM, Ramachandran VS (November 2005). “Neurocognitive mechanisms of synesthesia” . Neuron (Review) 48 (3): 509–20. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2005.10.012 . PMID 16269367 . 9. Galton F (1880). “Visualized Numerals”. Nature 21 (543): 494–5. doi:10.1038/021494e0 . 10. Seron X, Pesenti M, Noël MP, Deloche G, Cornet JA (August 1992). “Images of numbers, or “When 98 is upper left and 6 sky blue” “. Cognition 44 (1–2): 159–96. doi:10.1016/0010-0277(92)90053-K . PMID 1511585 . 11. [page needed] van Campen, Cretien (2007). The Hidden Sense: Synesthesia in Art and Science. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-22081-4. OCLC 80179991 . 12. Campen, Cretien van (2009) “The Hidden Sense: On Becoming Aware of Synesthesia” TECCOGS, vol. 1, pp. 1-13.[1] 13. Campen C (1999). “Artistic and psychological experiments with synesthesia”. Leonardo 32 (1): 9–14. doi:10.1162/002409499552948 . 14. [page needed] Sagiv, Noam; Robertson, Lynn C (2005). Synesthesia: perspectives from cognitive neuroscience. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-516623-X. OCLC 53020292 . 15. [page needed] Flournoy, Théodore (2001). Des phénomènes de synopsie (Audition colorée). Adamant Media Corporation. ISBN 0-543-94462-X. 16. [broken citation] Dittmar, A. (Ed.) (2007) Synästhesien. Roter Faden durchs Leben? Essen, Verlag Die Blaue Eule. 17. Dailey A, Martindale C, Borkum J (1997). “Creativity, synesthesia, and physiognomic perception”. Creativity Research Journal 10 (1): 1–8. doi:10.1207/s15326934crj1001_1 . 18. [unreliable source?] “Slashdot Discussion” . 2006-02-19. Retrieved 2006-08-14. 19. [unreliable medical source?] Do sequence-space synaesthetes have better spatial imagery skills? Maybe not , The National Center for Biotechnology Information 20. [unreliable source?] A Mind That Touches the Past , Sciencemag.org 21. Galton F (1881). “The visions of sane persons” (PDF). Fortnightly Review 29: 729–40. Retrieved 2008-06-17. 22. Naumer MJ, van den Bosch JJ (July 2009). “Touching sounds: thalamocortical plasticity and the neural basis of multisensory integration”. J. Neurophysiol. 102 (1): 7–8. doi:10.1152/jn.00209.2009 . PMID 19403745 . 23. [page needed] Cytowic, Richard E. (2002). Synesthesia: A Union of the Senses (2nd edition). Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-03296-1. OCLC 49395033 24. Edelstein, Miren, David Brang, Romke Rouw, and Vilayanur S. Ramachandran. “Misophonia: Physiological Investigations and Case Descriptions.” Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7 (2013): n. pag. National Center for Biotechnology Information. US National Library of Medicine, 25 June 2013. Web. 5 Dec. 2013. 25. [non-primary source needed][dead link] Ramachan dran VS and Hubbard EM (2001). “Synaesthesia: A window into perception, thought and language” (PDF). Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (12). pp. 3–34. 26. Grossenbacher PG, Lovelace CT (January 2001). “Mechanisms of synesthesia: cognitive and physiological constraints”. Trends Cogn. Sci. 5 (1): 36–41. doi:10.1016/S1364-6613(00)01571-0 . PMID 11164734 . 27. [page needed] Gage, J.Colour and Culture. Practice and Meaning from Antiquity to Abstraction. (London:Thames & Hudson, 1993). 28. Peacock, Kenneth. “Instruments to Perform Color-Music: Two Centuries of Technological Experimentation,”Leonardo 21, No. 4 (1988) 397–406. 29. [page needed] Jewanski, J. & N. Sidler (Eds.). Farbe – Licht – Musik. Synaesthesie und Farblichtmusik. Bern: Peter Lang, 2006. 30. Mahling, F. (1926) Das Problem der `audition colorée’: Eine historisch-kritische Untersuchung. Archiv für die gesamte Psychologie, 57, 165–301. 31. Fechner, G. (1876) Vorschule der Aesthetik. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Hartel. Website: [2] 32. Campen, Cretien van (1996). De verwarring der zintuigen. Artistieke en psychologische experimenten met synesthesie. Psychologie & Maatschappij, vol. 20, nr. 1, pp. 10–26. 33. Galton F (1880). “Visualized Numerals”. Nature 21 (533): 252–6. doi:10.1038/021252a0 . 34. [page needed] Galton F (1883). Inquiries into Human Faculty and Its Development . Macmillan. Retrieved 2008-06-17. 35. Berman G (1999). “Synesthesia and the Arts”. Leonardo 32 (1): 15–22. doi:10.1162/002409499552957 . 36. [page needed] Maur, Karin von (1999). The Sound of Painting: Music in Modern Art (Pegasus Library). Munich: Prestel. ISBN 3-7913-2082-3. 37. [page needed] Gage, John D. (1993). Colour and culture: practice and meaning from antiquity to abstraction. London: Thames and Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27818-0. 38. [page needed] Gage, John D. (1999). Color and meaning: art, science, and symbolism. Berkeley: University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-22611-9. 39. [page needed] Campen, Cretien van (2009) Visual Music and Musical Paintings. The Quest for Synesthesia in the Arts. In: F. Bacci & D. Melcher. Making Sense of Art, making Art of Sense. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 40. Steen, C. (2001). Visions Shared: A Firsthand Look into Synesthesia and Art, Leonardo, Vol. 34, No. 3, Pages 203–208 doi:10.1162/002409401750286949 41. Marcia Smilack Website Accessed 20 Aug 2006. 42. Duffy, P.L. (2006). “Images of Synesthetes and their Perceptions of Language in Fiction” . 6th Annual Meeting of the American Synesthesia Association. University of South Florida. 43. Duffy PL, Simner J (2010). “Synaesthesia in fiction”. Cortex 46 (2): 277–278. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2008.11.003 . PMID 19081086 . 44. [page needed] Nabokov, Vladimir. 1966. Speak, Memory: An Autobiography Revisited. New York: Putnam. 45. [page needed] Ellington, as quoted in George, Don. 1981. Sweet man: The real Duke Ellington. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons. Page 226. 46. according to the Russian press: Yastrebtsev V. “On N.A.Rimsky-Korsakov’s color sound-contemplation.” Russkaya muzykalnaya gazeta, 1908, N 39–40, p. 842–845 (in Russian), cited by Bulat Galeyev (1999). 47. see Samuel, Claude. 1994 (1986). Olivier Messiaen: Music and Color. Conversations with Claude Samuel. Translated by E. Thomas Glasow. Portland, Oregon: Amadeus Press. 48. [page needed] Feynman, Richard. 1988. What Do You Care What Other People Think? New York: Norton. P. 59. 49. Seaberg, M. (2011). Tasting the Universe. New Page Books. ISBN 978-1-60163-159-6. 50. Cairns, Dan (2008-02-24). “Times Online interview” . The Times (London). Retrieved 2008-07-24. 51. Forrest, Emma (March 30, 2009). “Emma Forrest meets New York’s favourite art-punk rockers Yeah Yeah Yeahs” . guardian.co.uk (London: The Guardian). Retrieved 2009-05-07. 52. Chase, Brian. “Brian Chase’s blog” . yeahyeahyeahs.com. Retrieved 2009-05-07. [dead link]

53. Tesla, Nikola. “The Strange Life of Nikola Tesla” . pitt.edu. Retrieved 4 September 2012. 54. [unreliable source?] It just always stuck out in my mind, and I could always see it. I don’t know if that makes sense, but I could always visualize what I was hearing… Yeah, it was always like weird colors.” From a Nightline interview with Pharrell 55. “Synesthetes: “People of the Future” ” . Psychology Today. March 3, 2012. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 56. Loose Women | Marina and the Diamonds – ITV Lifestyle ITV – 27 April 2010 – Retrieved 28 April 2010. 57. [page needed] Dann, Kevin T. (1998). Bright colors falsely seen: synaesthesia

TAKE THE TEST

Aliearia

ORION

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Tadpoles…from water to land
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Orion, born from a primordial egg
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Meet the egg….
What does a fertilized egg look like?

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From the egg cell, fertilized, to meiosis (tetrad)
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Sperm in egg or tadpole?

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ATOM BOMB

On August 6, 1945 the ATOM bomb was dropped on Hitoshima. Surely the date amd the name Atom have nothing to do with the Transfiguration of Jesus being celebrated on August 6, EVERY YEAR, BY CHRISTIANS/CATHOLICS. And surely the fact of Christian/Catholic Bibles say: THE LORD IS FOUND IN THE STARS

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So, how do the ancients know where all planets, galaxies, atoms, humans, stars and the universal creation come from?

They asked SIRI..
SIRI, how do u make mac n cheese?
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We are binary code pcs

Job 38:7

NEBULA EYE

Seers of 2 worlds

BINARY COMMUNICATION

FUTURE AND PAST STAR COMMUNICATORS
Aliearia

HITLER, CREATIONISTS & THE GODS(Goddess)

CREATIONSTS SNC THEORY funny as HELL

HOW OLD R DINOSAURS

Hitlers jurassic park

Iphone diwali

Running of the bulls

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ATHIESTS N CREATIONIST AT  NMUSEUM..NO FREE THINKERS ALLOWED

SHUTTER ISLAND is complicated, edge-o-the seat matrix-like, hauntingly twisted

“Shutter Island” starts working on us with the first musical notes under the Paramount logo’s mountain, even before the film starts. They’re ominous and doomy. So is the film. This is Martin Scorsese’s evocation of the delicious shuddering fear we feel when horror movies are about something and don’t release all the tension with action scenes.

In its own way it’s a haunted house movie, or make that a haunted castle or fortress. Shutter Island, we’re told, is a remote and craggy island off Boston, where a Civil War-era fort has been adapted as a prison for the criminally insane. We approach it by boat through lowering skies, and the feeling is something like the approach to King Kong’s island: Looming in gloom from the sea, it fills the visitor with dread. To this island travel U.S. marshal Teddy Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his partner Chuck Aule (Mark Ruffalo).

It’s 1954, and they are assigned to investigate the disappearance of a child murderer (Emily Mortimer). There seems to be no way to leave the island alive. The disappearance of one prisoner might not require the presence of two marshals unfamiliar with the situation, but we never ask that question. Not after the ominous walls of the prison arise. Not after the visitors are shown into the office of the prison medical director, Dr. Cawley, played by Ben Kingsley with that forbidding charm he has mastered.

It’s clear that Teddy has no idea what he’s getting himself into. Teddy — such an innocuous name in such a gothic setting. Scorsese, working from a novel by Dennis Lehane, seems to be telling a simple enough story here; the woman is missing, and Teddy and Chuck will look for her. But the cold, gray walls clamp in on them, and the offices of Cawley and his colleagues, furnished for the Civil War commanding officers, seem borrowed from a tale by Edgar Allan Poe.

Scorsese the craftsman chips away at reality piece by piece. Flashbacks suggest Teddy’s traumas in the decade since World War II. That war, its prologue and aftermath, supplied the dark undercurrent of classic film noir. The term “post-traumatic shock syndrome” was not then in use, but its symptoms could be seen in men attempting to look confident in their facades of unstyled suits, subdued ties, heavy smoking and fedoras pulled low against the rain. DiCaprio and Ruffalo both affect this look, but DiCaprio makes it seem more like a hopeful disguise.

The film’s primary effect is on the senses. Everything is brought together into a disturbing foreshadow of dreadful secrets. How did this woman escape from a locked cell in a locked ward in the old fort, its walls thick enough to withstand cannon fire? Why do Cawley and his sinister colleague Dr. Naehring (Max Von Sydow, ready to play chess with Death) seem to be concealing something? Why is even such a pleasant person as the deputy warden not quite convincingly friendly? (He’s played by John Carroll Lynch, Marge’s husband in “Fargo,” so you can sense how nice he should be.) Why do the methods in the prison trigger flashbacks to Teddy’s memories of helping to liberate a Nazi death camp?

These kinds of questions are at the heart of film noir. The hero is always flawed. Scorsese showed his actors the great 1947 noir “Out of the Past,” whose very title is a noir theme: Characters never arrive at a story without baggage. They have unsettled issues, buried traumas. So, yes, perhaps Teddy isn’t simply a clean-cut G-man. But why are the others so strange? Kingsley in particular exudes menace every time he smiles.

There are thrilling visuals in “Shutter Island.” Another film Scorsese showed his cast was Hitchcock’s “Vertigo,” and we sense echoes of its hero’s fear of heights. There’s the possibility that the escaped woman might be lurking in a cave on a cliff, or hiding in a lighthouse. Both involve hazardous terrain to negotiate, above vertiginous falls to waves pounding on the rocks below. A possible hurricane is approaching. Light leaks out of the sky. The wind sounds mournful. It is, as they say, a dark and stormy night. And that’s what the movie is about: atmosphere, ominous portents, the erosion of Teddy’s confidence and even his identity. It’s all done with flawless directorial command. Scorsese has fear to evoke, and he does it with many notes.

You may read reviews of “Shutter Island” complaining that the ending blindsides you. The uncertainty it causes prevents the film from feeling perfect on first viewing. I have a feeling it might improve on second. Some may believe it doesn’t make sense. Or that, if it does, then the movie leading up to it doesn’t. I asked myself: OK, then, how should it end? What would be more satisfactory? Why can’t I be one of those critics who informs the director what he should have done instead?

Oh, I’ve had moments like that. Every moviegoer does. But not with “Shutter Island.” This movie is all of a piece, even the parts that don’t appear to fit. There is a human tendency to note carefully what goes before, and draw logical conclusions. But –what if you can’t nail down exactly what went before? What if there were things about Cawley and his peculiar staff that were hidden? What if the movie lacks a reliable narrator? What if its point of view isn’t omniscient but fragmented? Where can it all lead? What does it mean? We ask, and Teddy asks, too.

ATHEISTS HAVE THE NEWEST DOWNLOADS

WHAT DOES THE AGNOSTICS SEE THAT A CREATIONIST CANT?

Well, besides this….
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A man cow?
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SAM HARRIS ON FREE WILL

THE 10 COMMANDMENTS

GEORGE CARLIN ON the 10 COMMANDMENTS

DARKMATTER ON GODS MORALS

ATHEIST COMEDIAN…WHO GOES TO HEAVEN

MORALS N GOD
Min 00-12:00
A spiritual being does not need an intidating dominating material god to give em rules

Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) is a personality disorder [1] in which a person is excessively preoccupied with personal adequacy, power, prestige and vanity, mentally unable to see the destructive damage they are causing to themselves and to others in the process. It is estimated that this condition affects one percent of the population. [2][3] First formulated in 1968, NPD was historically called megalomania, and is a form of severe egocentrism. [4]

Some people diagnosed with a narcissistic personality disorder are characterized by exaggerated feelings of self-importance. They have a sense of entitlement and demonstrate grandiosity in their beliefs and behavior. They have a strong need for admiration, but lack feelings of empathy. [5]

Symptoms of this disorder, as defined by the DSM-IV-TR, include: [1]

Expects to be recognized as superior and special, without superior accomplishments Expects constant attention, admiration and positive reinforcement from others Envies others and believes others envy him/her Is preoccupied with thoughts and fantasies of great success, enormous attractiveness, power, intelligence Lacks the ability to empathize with the feelings or desires of others Is arrogant in attitudes and behavior Has expectations of special treatment that are unrealistic

MEGAMANIA

Megalomania is a psychopathological condition characterized by delusional fantasies of power, relevance, omnipotence, and by inflated self-esteem. Adolf Hitler is widely considered to have been a megalomaniac. [1] Historically it was used as an old name for narcissistic personality disorder prior to the latter’s first use by Heinz Kohut in 1968, and is used today as a non-clinical equivalent. [2][3] It is not mentioned in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) [4] or the International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD).

The word megalomania is derived from the Greek μεγαλο- megalo- “large, great”, and μανία mania “madness, frenzy”. The first attested use of the word “megalomania” in English is in 1890 as a translation of the French word mégalomanie.

Sigmund Freud commented of the adult neurotic’s sense of omnipotence that “this belief is a frank acknowledgement of a relic of the old megalomania of infancy”. [5] He similarly concluded that “we can detect an element of megalomania in most other forms of paranoic disorder. We are justified in assuming that this megalomania is essentially of an infantile nature and that, as development proceeds, it is sacrificed to social considerations”. [6]

Edmund Bergler also considered megalomania to be normal in the child, [7] and to be re-activated in later life in gambling. [8] Otto Fenichel states that, for those who react in later life to narcissistic hurt with denial, a similar regression to the megalomania of childhood is taking place. [9]

Whereas Freud saw megalomania as an obstacle to psychoanalysis, in the second half of the 20th century object relations theory, both in the States and among British Kleinians, set about revaluing megalomania as a defence mechanism that offered potential access for therapy. [10] Such an approach built on Heinz Kohut’s view of narcissistic megalomania as an aspect of normal development, by contrast with Kernberg’s consideration of such grandiosity as a pathological development distortion. [11]

As well as a symptom of pathology, a degree of megalomania is a way of defending against loss in everyday life -a manic defense against the experience of separation and loss. [12] When linked to a position of power, whether military, political, or control-freak bureaucratical, [13] it is likely to lead to miscalculation as a by-product of the figure’s swollen head. [14]

Because the megalomaniac tends not to be particularly interested in examining or in changing the self, [15] talking cures may be less effective than medication in their treatment. [16] The transference in a talking cure may also be compromised by the patient’s enhancement of any megalomaniac tendencies within the analyst him/herself.

TRANSFORMERS N JESUS SITE

Council basil …smithsonian channel

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Orion and apollo

1957

Nazis… Hitlers Jurassic Park

Nazis and Norse Vikings

Father Joseph Fisher and Piri Reis Maps

DAVID WILCOCK ON PIRI REIS

KNOSSES, MINOANS ARE ATLANTEANS

Doomsday mayan carbon dating before columbus

Who came to America before Columbus

Answer: Those who painted their journey as the oldest recorded map in history:
MINOANS
CRETE:

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ARTEMIS KILLED ORION (the Temple of Artemis is one of the 7 world wonders)
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Mithraism

OPHIUCUS serpent holder, bull, lion, man

Olympics in Sochi bull (Taurus w 1 man)
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Where does this come from?
CRETE!
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And the end of the olympics:
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Little (feminine girl in BLUE) reaching for the RED BLOOD MOON BALLOON
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———–

LADIES IN BLUE (The true Exodus tribes)

Kensington enigma

Below channel site..look for show 8/12-13/2014 Hittites
SMITHSONIAN CHANNEL MUSEUM SECRETS
Hittites (738 BC) were attacked by Assyrians. Turkish I.D were like the Ottomans and the Hittites attacked Ramses 2nd…
The story is written on 2 different tablets (worlds 1st peace treaty)
HITTITE WARRIORS

Blonde w blue eyes=fair in Bible

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George w blonde wig

OPHIUCUS…CAN U SEE IT NOW?

Mithraism and the vatican

Davinci Code The Grail Doesnt Know Who the Grail Is… some of us remain sleepers

TEMPLARS (Oct 13, 1307)

TEMPLARS KNEW THE TRUTH

DAVINCI Code..all religions are 1

THE DREAM
Aliearia

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ROBIN WILLIAMS DIES

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