Monthly Archives: August 2015

SERPENT BRIDE

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The male serpent symbol, orb not opened..

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Complete being, masculine with feminine, orb is opened

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13th secret sign. Ophiucus 2014-2015 serpent holder. Marry the 2 halves, masculine+feminine, bride-groom:

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DAVINCI CODE BLADE (masculine) CHALICE (feminine)

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Aliearia

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SYMBOLISM IN CHRISTIANITY/CATHOLIC CHURCH

Who Is The Roman Catholic Church Really Worshiping?

This study will reveal the meaning of the symbols, statues and attire used by the Pope and priests, as they reveal what the Papal Church is really worshiping.

For thousands of years Pagan religions have used symbols to show which gods they worshiped. These symbols were declared openly in Egypt, Babylon, Rome and other cultures.

These symbols are still used today, but their true meanings are hidden.

Most people typically don’t notice the symbol or they have a positive impression of it.

The enlightened understand the meaning behind the symbols, and they use them to communicate with others.

Leaders of a Christian Church should not have anything to do with the symbols of pagan gods.

“For what fellowship has righteousness with lawlessness? And what communion has light with darkness? And what agreement has the temple of God with idols? For you are the temple of the living God.” 2 Corinthians 6:14,16

If you’re Catholic, ask yourself why the leaders of the Roman Catholic Church are using all of these symbols of pagan gods.

The Zucchetti which is worn by Catholic priests, cardinals and the Pope, represents respect, fear and submission to Cybele, the Mother Goddess of Rome.

Yarmulke (Jewish) and Kufi (Muslims).

The Roman Catholic Church calls it the Zucchetti.

Vatican Hill was the site of the largest ancient temple to Cybele. Ashtoreth the goddess of fertility, sexuality and war; was known as Cybele in Rome.

The Bible warns against worshiping her, “Then the children of Israel again did evil in the sight of the LORD, and served the Baals and the Ashtoreths.” Judges 10:6

The Bible declares “For a man indeed ought not to cover his head, since he is the image and glory of God.” 1 Corinthians 11:7

Ask yourself, why do Catholic priests, Bishops and the Pope, wear the Cap of Cybele?

The Mitre hat that is worn by Catholic priests, cardinals and the Pope, represents Dagon the Babylonian fish god.

worn by the head priest of Cybele (the Magna Mater) or the Great Queen Mother Goddess.

Today the Catholic Cardinals, Bishops and the Pope all wear the open fish-mouth mitre, which represents the worship of Cybele and Dagon.

The Mitre hat of Dagan is always worn over the Kippa of Ashtoreth/Cybele, as you can see in the picture of Pope Francis I.

God warned the Jews not to worship the gods of Babylon, ” I will pronounce My judgments on them concerning all their wickedness, whereby they have forsaken Me and have offered sacrifices to other gods, and worshiped the works of their own hands.” Jeremiah 1:16

Ask yourself, why do Catholic Cardinals, Bishops and the Pope, all wear the mitre of Dagan?

The Obelisk in St. Peter’s Square represents the worship of the Sun god.

known Egyptian obelisk was re-erected in 1586 A.D., in front of St. Peter’s Basilica. It is surrounded by a sun wheel, with the points lining up with the Vernal Equinox, the Summer Solstice and the Winter Solstice.

During the sunrise on the Vernal Equinox, the sun causes the obelisk to cast its shadow onto the dome of St. Peter’s Basilica, which represents the sexual union of the sun god and moon goddess.

Another Egyptian obelisk sits in front of the Pantheon of ancient Rome, which housed statues of their pagan gods. The obelisk was originally constructed by Pharaoh Ramses II for the Temple of Ra in Heliopolis. It was brought to Rome in ancient times where it was used near a shrine to the Egyptian god Isis.

The Pantheon was dedicated to pan theos, meaning “all the gods.” When it became a Roman Catholic Church, it was dedicated to the Virgin Mary and all the martyrs.

God’s 2nd commandment says, “You shall not make for yourself a carved image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth; you shall not bow down to them nor serve them. For I, the Lord your God, am a jealous God.” Exodus 20:4-5

Ask yourself, why does the Catholic Church venerate pagan monuments to the Sun god?

The six-sided star is the supreme symbol of Satanic tyranny.

emblem of the Theosophical Society, which she founded in 1875.

Satanists, Luciferians, astrologers and witches use it to invoke the power of demons.

The six-sided star numerically equals 666 (6 points, 6 triangles, 6-sided hexagon).

Christians pass it off as the ‘Star of David‘ but the truth is that King David never used a star, so calling it a nice sounding name hides what it really represents. King Solomon used it in witchcraft, magic and idolatrous worship to Ashtoreth and to Moloch.

Stephen accused the Jewish leaders, “And you took up the tent of Moloch, and the star of your god Remphan, the figures which you made” “in order to worship them.” Acts 7:43

Ask yourself, why does the Catholic Church use the Satanic six-sided star?

The eight-pointed star represents the pagan goddess Ishtar, the lightbringer.

the goddess of fertility, love and war. Her cult was the most important one in ancient Babylon.

An eight-point star enclosed within a circle is the symbol for the sun god, as it’s points represent the solstices and equinoxes.

The “Babylonian star-cult is the core and the archetype of subsequent astrology.”

At the center of St. Peter’s Basilica, the Pope sits in the middle of eight 8-sided stars.

Ask yourself, why does the Catholic Church use the eight-pointed star of Ishtar?

The Maltese Cross represents Shamash, the god of the Sun and Justice.

Babylonian pantheons.

Shamash was the god of justice in Babylonia and Assyria, corresponding to Sumerian Utu.

This cross was identified with a Sun god eight centuries before Christ and long before it was called the Maltese Cross by the Knights of Malta.

It’s also called the Iron Cross. Roman Catholic Adolph Hitler renewed use of the Iron Cross in 1939 and superimposed the Nazi swastika in its center.

Ask yourself, why does the Pope wear the cross of Shamash the Sun god?

Pine cones symbolize the worship of the solar god Osiris.

the pineal gland.

The pine cone staff is a symbol of the solar god Osiris and originated in Egypt where he was their messiah who died for his people and whose Mother, Isis, was worshiped as the Virgin Mother.

The Vatican also has the world’s largest pine cone that once decorated a fountain in ancient Rome next to a vast Temple of Isis.

At the Old St. Peter’s Basilica, it was dedicated to Attis, son and lover of Cybele. The Catholic Church then relocated it to what’s now called the Vatican Court of the Pigna.

Ask yourself, why do Popes use pine cones which symbolize the solar god Osiris?

Revelation 13 says that Satan the dragon gives authority to the antichrist beast.

The word Vatican means “divining serpent,” as Vatis = diviner; Can = serpent.

The Bible calls Satan the great dragon, who deceives the world.

“So the great dragon was cast out, that serpent of old, called the Devil and Satan, who deceives the whole world; he was cast to the earth, and his angels were cast out with him.” Revelation 12:9

Revelation 13 tells us that antichrist beast is empowered by the dragon to deceive the world.

“So they worshiped the dragon who gave authority to the beast; and they worshiped the beast, saying, “Who is like the beast? Who is able to make war with him?” Revelation 13:3

Aliearia

MOSES, SERPENT ASHERAH BRIDE, ATLAS

← Meet the wife of God Asherah, Part II: The serpent’s bride →

Asherah

The Wife of God has disappeared — or, has She? Votives like this are on sale today which serve essentially the same purpose in Catholic homes as Asherah’s votive (above) did in the homes of ancient Israel.

← Meet the wife of God Asherah, Part II: The serpent’s bride →

Asherah, Part I: The lost bride of Yahweh

Posted on October 27, 2010

They worshiped Her under every green tree, according to the Hebrew Bible (what Christians call the Old Testament).
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The Bible also tells us Her image was to be found for years in the temple of Solomon, where the women wove hangings for Her.

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In temple and forest grove, Her image was apparently made of wood, since monotheistic reformers demanded it be chopped down and burned. It appears to have been a manmade object, but one carved of a tree and perhaps the image was a stylized tree of some kind.

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The archaelogical record suggests that Asherah was the Mother Goddess of Israel, the Wife of God, according to William Dever, who has unearthed many clues to her identity. She was worshiped, apparently throughout the time Israel stood as a nation. In many homes, images like the one above decorated household shrines.

Who was She, this lost Goddess of the Hebrews? And why is She no longer worshiped in the Judeo-Christian religions of today?

The Asherah votive emphasizes Her breasts, suggesting Her role as a fertility goddess, but Her stance represents Her nature as a mother in general. She no doubt aided in the concerns of mothers, including conception and childbirth, but was probably also the mother of all, a comforter and protector in an uncertain world. Inscriptions from ancient Israel tell us that Yahweh and “his Asherah” were invoked together for personal protection. Her identification with trees suggests that Asherah was, in effect, also Mother Nature — a figure we remember in our language, but unfortunately have lost as a part of our mainstream religions. She was, in other words, everything you would expect from the feminine half of the divine creative duo, a Great Mother.

Asherah’s image was lost to us not by chance, but by deliberate action of fundamentalist monotheists. First Her images were torn down, then Her stories were rewritten, then Her name was forgotten. In fact, Her name appears 40 times in modern translations of the Bible, but not at all in the first English translation, the King James Bible. Since no one knew who Asherah was anymore in the 17th century when the King James Version (KJV) was being created, Her name was translated as groves of trees or trees or images in groves, without understanding that those trees and groves of trees represented a mother goddess.

When archaeologists unearthed a treasure trove of Canaanite stories and other writings in Ugarit, in modern day Syria, they discovered that the mysterious “Asherah” was not an object, but a Goddess: the mother goddess of the Canaanites. When archaeologists discovered Her in Israel as well, a whole new picture of early Hebrew religion began to emerge. The argument is straightforward: 1. Asherah was a known Canaanite Goddess, the Mother Goddess and wife of the Father God. 2. The name is mentioned repeatedly as having been worshiped by the Israelites, to the dismay of monotheists. 3. Her name is found in inscriptions with Yahweh and 4. A mother goddess image is found frequently in the homes of ancient Israel. 5. She was worshiped, according to the Bible, in the woods with Baal AND in Yahweh’s temple. The common sense interpretation is that Israelites worshiped the mother goddess Asherah. And that She was the wife of whichever male God had the upper hand at the time: El, or Baal, or Yahweh. Israelite religion was not much different from Canaanite religion. The gods vied for supremacy, but the goddess remained.

Since archaeologists in the Holy Land tended to be religious and to enter the field of biblical archaeology in order to unearth evidence substantiating the Bible’s story, it has taken awhile for the plain truth to become clear. Gradually, however, more objective archaeologists, such as Dever, are making headway in proving Asherah’s case. The Bible says Hebrews kept worshiping Asherah; the archaeological record confirms it. What the Bible doesn’t say, and the archaeological record shows, is that Asherah was a mother goddess.

In Ugarit, She was known as Athiratu Yammi, She who Treads on the Sea. This suggests She was responsible for ending a time of chaos represented by the primordial sea and beginning the process of creation. The Sea God, or Sea Serpent Yam is the entity upon which She trod. In a particularly bizarre and suggestive passage in the Bible, 2 Kings 18:4, one monotheistic reformer, pursuing the typical course of smashing sacred stones and cutting down Asherahs records this additional fact: He broke into pieces the bronze snake Moses had made, for up to that time the Israelites had been burning incense to it. (It was called Nehushtan.)

Um, say what? This odd passage opens up a whole can of worms for me. Here are the serpent and the tree being worshiped together. (Garden of Eden anyone?) So, ah.. what exactly were people doing out there in the woods? They were worshiping idols, of course, burning incense, we are told. This passage from Hosea is instructive: Hosea 4:12,13 condemns those who “inquire of a thing of wood,” suggesting they were asking questions of an oracle, and who sacrifice under oak, poplar and terebinth “because their shade is good.” They are accused also of playing the harlot, which could be a reference to sexual activity, or simply an analogy in that the monotheists are claiming the people sold out to the “false” Canaanite gods. Israel was considered the bride of Yahweh in monotheistic thought, so worshiping other gods was whoring after them.

These passages make sense when you understand that this tree symbolism is closely connected with Asherah. Now we know She was worshiped in the wood, with an image made of wood and that people sought knowledge and made sacrifices there.

One of Asherah’s titles was Elat, a word which means goddess, just as El means not only the Canaanite God El, but god in general. Interestingly, the word Elat is translated in the Bible as terebinth, a large shade tree found in Israel. A great deal of the time, God is a translation not of Yahweh, his particular name given to Moses, but of the Hebrew name Elohim, which is plural, gender neutral, meaning “gods.” This word is also related to the word for oak tree. What did it really mean to the ancients to worship in a grove of trees? To see the gods as like the oaks? The goddess as a green tree spreading Her leaves over the worshiper, providing shade in a hot country?

Hebrews were not alone in worshiping gods of the forest, of course. Celtic, Greek, and Germanic peoples also worshiped in groves. Their gods were gods of nature. Were the Israelites really so different?

In the Bible, Elohim created a man and woman. Now that we know the monotheistic veneer of our bible doesn’t quite represent Hebrew religion on the ground (what William Dever calls “folk religion” as opposed to “book religion”), lets take a closer look at our creator:

Genesis 1:26:

“Then Elohim said, ‘Let us make man in our image, in our likeness, and let them rule over the fish of the sea and the birds of the air, over the livestock, over all the earth, and over all the creatures that move along the ground.’

So Elohim created man in his own image, in the image of Elohim he created them; male and female he created them.”

Takes on a whole new meaning, doesn’t it, when you become aware of the Mother Goddess being worshiped next to God in every home and under every green tree in the forest groves? Who is this “US” doing the creating? Well, evidently, the creator(s) is/are male and female, like the creatures he/She/they created.

Now move on to a later passage, in 1 Kings 18: 19 , which makes it clear that Asherah was served by 400 prophets. This is no minor religion. Maybe when the prophets complained She was worshiped under every tree, they meant it. Every tree, every home, and also, sometimes, in the temple.

In Exodus, we are told that God warned the people to get rid of Asherah’s emblems when they conquered the land of Canaan; in the periods of the books of the Judges and the Kings, we are told that the “good” prophets, kings and reformers continually had to burn and smash the idols of Asherah; finally, in Jeremiah, we are told that worship of Asherah has resulted in the fanatical monotheistic God’s decision to wipe out Israel and Judah (the southern portion of the formerly united kingdom) via the invasion of outside peoples. The thing is, we are told most of these things by a single author, or group of authors: the Deuteronomist. This is a character (or possibly group of characters) writing and rewriting portions of the Bible in later days, around the 7th century BC, either just before or during the exile of the Jews to Babylon. According to the Deuteronomist, the priest Hilkiah claims in 2 Kings, chapter 22, to have “discovered” the ancient laws of Moses during temple renovations. These writings, “The Book of the Law” were mysteriously mislaid leading Israel to get its religion all wrong, apparently.

The works of the Deuteronomist conveyed a story that the Israelites had a covenant with Yahweh to worship him and only him. He claimed the Israelites had taken Canaan by force through a holy war in which they massacred the original inhabitants, putting to death (by God’s command) men, women and children in Jericho. (This claim is not supported by the archaelogical record.) And he claimed that God was a jealous God, one who demanded to be worshiped alone and who would punish the unfaithful by bringing other nations to conquer them if they worshiped others.

Was this really the religion of Israel? Apparently not. The common folk kept right on putting up their Asherahs in the woods and the temple and the little votive Asherahs in their home shrines. Only after Israel was conquered and the people of Judah returned from exile in Babylon did the fundamentalist fanatics with their violent, patriarchal, monotheistic God win the argument. The Deuteronomist’s work, along with the works of two other primary authors, the Yahwist and the Elohist, were compiled by a fourth source, called the Priestly source, to become the Bible we have today.

Asherah, tree goddess, mother of life, was lost. Truly, we were cast out of the Garden of Eden by Yahweh, or at least, his supporters. Separated from the Tree of Life, our mother, we flounder like orphans. America’s religiosity is more comparable to Iran’s than to that of Western Europe, where Yahweh’s religion is in decline. Is it coincidence that we, the worshipers of a male warrior, spend our money on war while children are allowed to live in poverty without health care? Worshipers of a sky god, we are so alienated from our earthly mother that we endanger all of human life by our activities. And the hard edge of the fundamentalist who claims to have found the one true law and believes those who think otherwise are worthy of death (or eternal damnation) is still with us today.

Still, I think it has only ever been a relatively small percentage of people who hold to the hardest edge of monotheism. We are surrounded by Mother Nature and she seeps into our traditions. The Shekinah, Mary, the Mother of God, the Christmas Tree and the Easter Egg, the bumper sticker imploring us to Honor Thy Mother with an image of the earth as seen from above, the fairies and elves and lost brides of our children’s tales are all ways in which the Mother Goddess seeps back into our lopsided psyche. The Goddess is lost, officially, but remembered deep within. Archaeology’s gift of restoring Asherah to our consciousness reminds us of what we already know: God does indeed have a wife. He must. For if we are his children, then we must have a mother.

See also: Asherah, Part II.

This entry was posted in Asherah, Canaanite mythology, goddess, Goddess in the Bible, sea goddess and tagged ancient hebrew religion, ancient views of the feminine, asherah, baal, canaanite mythology, earth goddesses, Eden, el, goddess in the bible, mary, mary as goddess, myths of the feminine, names of the goddess, primordial sea, tree of life, water goddesses, yahweh. Bookmark the permalink.

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Star of the Sea Asherah, Part III: The Lion Lady The Maiden Warrior and the Sun Goddess in the Epic of Baal In “Aphrodite/Venus” In “Anat” In “Anat”

bc says:

March 30, 2011 at 7:15 pm

Just a few tidbits to contribute: In Christian doctrine, “us” in Genesis refers to the trinity. It is entirely true that Israel did “adopt” some deities from neighboring country, but that simply means that the deities were adopted… Not that they had included them in their religion since the beginning. And of course, we all know that they destroyed the extra statues and whatnot later because this was against their monotheistic religion. Fairly simple. I feel like this article tries to distort that into a matter of polytheistic doctrine and monotheistic extremists rather than acknowledging that the Israelites were just monotheists that had a strong habit of picking up neighboring gods, and those that stayed true to Judaism tried to correct them all the time. On another note, creating them male and female in God’s likeness doesn’t refer to physical likeness, so there is no missing ‘female God counterpart’ in that verse. God is neither male or female. The “likeness” was the spark of life, the intelligence, and the inherent goodness in humans. Peace out

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Carisa says:

March 31, 2011 at 7:38 am

I think you have done a good job of summarizing the version of Christian interpretation of Genesis which I was taught as a child as well. If you are happy with your religion and willing to tolerate other points of view, then peace be with you as well. We can agree to disagree. I am always hesitant to be the one to offer the fruit of what scholars believe is truth to one who is genuinely happy in the garden. I have personally experienced the crisis of faith which comes from learning too much of the history of God and sometimes it isn’t pretty. However, if you genuinely want to find out why scholars disagree with your interpretation, you could begin by learning some Sumerian-Babylonian mythology, which is much older than anything written in the Bible and from which many of the early chapters of Genesis were copied, some history of the Canaanites generally and in particular the information unearthed in Ugarit, a city which predated Israel to the north. Then you could turn to objective Biblical scholars who have interpreted the texts themselves and find out why they think different authors wrote — and changed — the books which eventually became the Bible. Start by looking into the Documentary Hypothesis. An online friend of mine recommends Who Wrote the Bible? by Richard Friedman as a good introduction to this subject, which I personally learned by a more circuitous route. He recently ran a clip of an interview with Friedman here. (It’s at the bottom of the post.) As for God being male, this was the teaching of the Christian churches until very recently in history, as was the doctrine of Original Sin, which said humans were inherently bad rather than inherently good. However, I, like you, was taught the more positive, gender-neutral version of a God who created inherently good humans. You can learn more about Asherah from William Dever’s book Did God Have a Wife? and more about the Sumerians from Samuel Noah Kramer’s book The Sumerians: Their History, Culture and Character. Quite a bit of the writings of Ugarit can be found online. Best wishes in your spiritual path, wherever it ultimately leads you.

Reply

Alan : ) says:

January 18, 2015 at 10:55 am

Carisa: Thank You for your well-written and reasonable response… I have been reading other responses of poorly-informed extremists on several sites, and your approach is a breath of fresh air that inspires additional inquiry. Cheers… : )

richard katz says:

January 14, 2015 at 4:02 pm

forgot to put in the URL (slap upside the head) https://docs.google.com/document/d/1FrTDiVrAAt_wXToo7SDbTHJPMqFBLhk0LnXKBveO9Kg/edit?usp=sharing

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TA says:

March 30, 2015 at 11:50 am

I believe Mother Goddess worship predated male god only worship throughout prehistory before Mother Goddess was deliberately edited out of the Bible to support the male god only worship. Sadly most of believe in the deception of later worship

Reply

Richard Katz says:

April 5, 2011 at 11:27 pm

You should expand and expound a bit on that reference to the First Book of Kings chap 18. That reference to the Prophets of the Ashera(h) was where I first got wind of the idea that maybe this monotheism that we practice so widely was made up, as you say, pretty much from whole cloth — because at the end of the day, as recounted in chap 18 of 1 Kings, Elijah has 450 Prophets of Baal put to death but no mention is made of anything happening to the Prophets of the Asherah who were also there and were just as idolatrous! So I pretty much agree — ie it sounds right to me — that a monotheist mafia took over sometime around then, like 650 BC or so. But I do like the way you sort of personalize that with “the Deuteronomist”. Sounds like it ought to be a pretty neat comic book.

Reply

Carisa says:

April 6, 2011 at 8:28 am

Very good point Richard. Thanks. Yes, I find it very suspicious that there’s a contest between Yahweh and Baal while Asherah apparently just sits by watching the guys duke it out (over her?) I would love to see the comic book.

Reply

richard katz says:

January 14, 2015 at 4:00 pm

This was all a while ago — 2011! Since then I have encountered a half a shelf of books at the GTU Library in Berkeley (Graduate Theological Union) all about Asherah. Most of this stuff is art history professors and historians and theologians repeating the stuff that other Scholars have handed down, but hey, what about the pictures of the steles in the British Museum depicting Ashera and her two men? Ashera herself is standing on … get this … a LION! that is SERIOUS. One of the guys is what the Coen Brothers refer to as “a managerial type” and the other guy is depicted as something I had never encountered in “Western” art, an erect male. She is wearing the customary female ruler’s headdress; and these guys are plainly working for HER. Hey, let me put in a URL here, see what you think, of my various ruminations on the matter; or skip my ruminations, embedded in the first page of the essay is a link to some graphics, particularly of large trees that I have fashioned to embody this concept of The Grove, including one very large eucalyptus that bears the inscription (in Hebrew) Nivieh HaAshera (= Prophets of the Ashera). I love to watch passersby examine that — the Hebrew inscription is bounded by a triangle /wedge that replicates the PHoenician symbol for woman, an upside down Phoenician first-letter-of-the-alphabet (it got legs and became the Roman “A”.)

richard katz says:

January 14, 2015 at 7:15 pm

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1FrTDiVrAAt_wXToo7SDbTHJPMqFBLhk0LnXKBveO9Kg/edit?usp=sharing (forgot the URL in my previous post)

goddessashie says:

September 10, 2013 at 7:22 pm

I say come to me now. http://www.theshootingstarhaslandedthegoddessashie.com/

Reply

Brenda Howell says:

October 29, 2013 at 4:53 pm

This information certainly makes sense out of that which made no sense at all. It is refreshing to be told the facts, without being told what to believe. Thank you.

Reply

N’Ghandi Hede’ says:

November 13, 2013 at 12:00 am

Excellent information but there remains facts of Truth not stated here as in the groves being “destroyed” because of their “worshipping” HER as Divine Mother Goddess there in the groves…Some other “erasures” noted as well…

Reply

Josué Santana says:

December 22, 2013 at 6:28 pm

Many things make sense to me after reading this. To list, the “Shabbat Bride”, how God could have maybe procreated a son without a female counterpart, why so many peoples around the globe worshiped a Goddess along side their God (including Native Americans such as the Aztec and Maya), a possible explanation of why Catholicism allows the worship of Mary, even why we place Christmas trees in our homes during the holidays (as a subtle remembrance to Asherah, who was worshiped under every green tree). Very informative!

Reply

Hector Pietri says:

February 22, 2014 at 6:26 pm

Trinity doctrine is recent ; when the bible was written the hebrews refer to the original hebrew gods ; Yahweh and Ashera ; the trinity doctrine came around later around the council of Nicea. But religious fanatics in general are uneducated in the fields of archeology; anthropology; ancient history ; biblical languages ; etc the word elohim originally meant the original politheistic hebrew religion ; people should not pay attention to fanatics; is a proven fact that always when there is a religious agenda lies and fraud prevails ; religious fanatics suffer from mental disorders documented in the books of psychiatry like; sectarian indoctrinating syndrome; coe r sitive peasuation(brain washing) mental control Stockholm syndrome besides suffering from a fanatic irrational blindness sickness ; I rest my case

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woden13 says:

May 8, 2014 at 5:15 am

Reblogged this on Wolf and Raven.

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Ciara says:

May 11, 2014 at 11:09 pm

This is brilliant!

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thematrixq says:

May 21, 2014 at 2:01 pm

Reblogged this on ?verything!.

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GodzEyez says:

May 26, 2014 at 2:56 am

Interesting reading… As a xtian i hav been wondering about d twist in the Godhead family…it shows a male chauvinistic agenda…God the FATHER, God the SON…God the Holy Mother (Spirit)…wow

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Wytchfawn says:

June 10, 2014 at 9:19 pm

Loving this. Why did I not find it sooner?

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Eugenia Fernández says:

October 21, 2014 at 6:10 am

There is a story behind every word. Though Yahweh says; In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him. Without him was not anything made that has been made. (John 1:1-3 WEB). So, each word is a story and if you want you can write a story of a word and it’s meaning . Tradition, time and curruption builds beliefs and critical is what comes behind every fortold manipulated story.

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Shadow says:

October 31, 2014 at 12:20 am

Reblogged this on Digital Quill and commented: Ah another goddess silenced for years…until a few years ago…seems like this has happened a time or two before.

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WolfThorn says:

January 11, 2015 at 10:15 pm

The inner-most tent in the tabernacle in the dessert wanderings, the one that actually housed the arc of the covenant, was also called “The veil of Asherah.” I have always thought of this reference as appropriate for the womb-like character of the holy of hollies.

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Alan : ) says:

January 18, 2015 at 12:50 pm

WolfThorn: thanks for the comment, where do You get your information that the inner-most tent was called the veil of Asherah? thanks…

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La Mestena says:

January 11, 2015 at 10:56 pm

Her other name is ‘Lilith’ and she was the original feminist. Making it plainly known that she wanted to be an equal to the Adamu. Her partner cried to El (Yahweh) that he wanted a more ‘submissive’ partner. So, the great El supposedly made Eve directly from the Adamu, Lilith possessed the pure genetic material of a goddess, and the ‘attitude’ that goes along with such powerful genes, so he assured the Adamu that Eve would be “cleaved unto him”. since she was ‘made’ from him.

She was indeed deliberately written out of the post Council of Nicea’s composed doctrines. In addition, she was to be seen as a harlot; the personification of a disobedient, prideful woman.

There has been so much tampering: misinterpretation, omission and re-composition of Judeo-Christian-Muslim doctrines, that it takes a diligent and relentless search starting from the ‘beginning’. One’s search should not be limited solely to the written religious AND esoteric documentation. The thousands of years old practice of Vocal Historical Transmission can be found all over the world, from the Celtic peoples to the N. and S. Americas, and should be taken into account when gathering information regarding ancient history. Many accounts that are relegated to the category of myth is being challenged by archaeological discoveries, like the uncovering of Troy several years ago. The implications are: if Troy exists then Achilles may, in fact, be a real person. And from there, a myriad of possibilities are opened up! Happy hunting, Beloveds.

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Alan : ) says:

January 18, 2015 at 12:55 pm

La Mestena: Thanks for your breath of fresh air… : )

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bryntc says:

January 12, 2015 at 10:38 am

Reblogged this on asherahsdaughter and commented: Such a rich, deep posting on the mysterious goddess that is my matrona. Thanks deeply to the authoress!

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bryntc says:

January 12, 2015 at 10:40 am

This points to a whole new look at the Garden of Eden’s story of the serpent and the tree, I think!

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Aj / Melia says:

January 15, 2015 at 8:11 am

Reblogged this on 4 of Wands and commented: Found this fascinating…some of it I knew, some of it I did not…

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tornflyingbutterfly says:

February 2, 2015 at 12:47 pm

This was beautifully written and was a soft, healing touch to my heart. Thank you.

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Bhagavatī says:

March 30, 2015 at 4:38 am

Excellent! Thank you so much for your work!

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Bhagavatī says:

March 30, 2015 at 4:40 am

Reblogged this on कमेवर दयेवर and commented: Jai Mata Di! Ja Ma Amma!

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sajjad ali says:

April 28, 2015 at 10:17 am

good work God is a Goddess 110% Spiritual answer

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irinamar33 says:

Aliearia

MOSES & HORNS

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REVELATION 1:16 And he had in his right hand seven stars: and out of his mouth went a sharp twoedged sword: and his countenance was as the sun shineth in his strength.

REVELATION 1:19 Write the things which thou hast seen, and the things which are, and the things which shall be hereafter;

1:20 The mystery of the seven stars which thou sawest in my right hand, and the seven golden candlesticks. The seven stars are the angels of the seven churches: and the seven candlesticks which thou sawest are the seven churches.

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The 7 stars= Pleiades/Taurus the Bull/Big Dipper

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The 7 stars=Pleiades=Taurus the Bull

HORNS OF MOSES

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Tut Moses, Thoth Moses, Grandson of Thoth. (Sphynx) Age of Leo, Moses, Age of Taurus the bull (hence, the horns)

1:19 Write the things which thou hast seen, and the things which are, and the things which shall be hereafter;

1:20 The mystery of the seven stars which thou sawest in my right hand, and the seven golden candlesticks. The seven stars are the angels of the seven churches: and the seven candlesticks which thou sawest are the seven churches.

See my vid MOSES, PHAROAH

Moses was born of a slave. He was found by an Egyptian and raised by the Egyptian elite, where he learned the language of the stars. He walked through the desert for 40 years and was led by a cloud of smoke during the day and fire at night. Most Bible readers have no clue what this cloud/fire is. This is due to the lack of understanding the language of the stars/signs/symbols. But, its simply common sense to realize how Moses was guided for the 40 years in the wildermess. Follow the directions in the verse:

AMOS 5:8

SEEKETH THE MAKER OF 7 STARS (PLEIADES) & ORION

ORION:

The four blood moon tetrads of 2014/15 is upon you. This is found in

ACTS 2:17-22

This is a TETRAD:

This is the TETRAD PYRAMID ALIGNMENT:

The alignment to Pleiades/Orion is the ”BRIDE-GROOM” (7 women/7 angels/7 stars) & 1 man

ISAIAH 4:1

The 7 stars= 7 women mystery

REVELATION 1:20

REVELATION 1:1-5

The mystery of the bridegroom

Origin of Easter from Ishtar and Ishtar from Hindu Goddess.(part-4)

Before ending, let me say a few words on serpents. Serpents are depicted as 2 main ideas in Hindu Thought. One is the sub-terrain mantle that comes out of the vents during earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. They are known as Naga or serpents. The underground tunnels and vents upon cooling became underground caves where the snakes started to live. Those who made the caves their dwelling places were also known as snakes or serpents or Nagas. Destruction by earthquakes or volcanoes is seen as dance of snakes.

The core of the earth is said to be the foremost snake, the Adhisesha. It is because of the core, the earth remains intact. This is metaphorically said that Adhisesha is bearing the weight of the earth. An adaptation of this is Atlas of Greek mythology. While Adhisesha bears the weight from within the globe, Atlas bears it on his shoulders. The same idea in two cultures cannot have been conceived independently of each other. Adhisesha concept is earliest and symbolic, whereas Greek Atlas is a depiction of an impossible type. This is the result of loss of touch or continuity with the original concept.

The snake is once again associated with the two main entities of Godhead in Hinduism. Shiva’s ‘twilight’ dance is indeed known as ‘playing with the serpent’ (BhujangastrAsa). That marks the collapse of the worlds and breaking of the lands. The liquid magma shoots out on all directions. They are called as snakes that once dwelled in underworlds, now coming out.

Another type of snake is the life form, our jiva or the soul – which is what we are in our inner self. The soul or jiva gives life to the body and is of the size of our thumb according to Upanishads. It resides as a coil of a snake in the tail of the spinal cord. The very purpose of meditation is to rouse that jiva. It is characterised as a serpent lying dormant within us. Almost everyone would have had a dream of snake some time in their life. It is due to the nature of this snake-like jiva. When aroused through Yoga or meditation or breathing procedures, this snake- like jiva (called Kundalini) rises up. It is because Sage Patanjali gave us the wisdom of Yoga and meditation and he himself has mastered the rise of Kundalini, he has been depicted as snake bodied in iconography.

(the master of Yaga) in Hindu temples.

After deluge – during cosmic devolution, where would the snakes (jivas) go? They are infinite (ananta) and are held by Vishnu or Narayana in sleeping posture.

When the physical worlds spring up again, these serpents (jivas) enter them and start new life. The concept of serpents in these two basic levels is seen in various forms. Most noted one is when the coiled serpent as Kundalini rises up through meditation and comes out through the nostrils. An
interesting depiction of this is seen in the hand of Jewish Asherah!

considered as Aherah, of the Jewish Thought holding something in her left hand which is considered by many as serpents. But looking at the shape of it, it looks similar to the previous image found at many places in India. Infact sages and yogis used to have a wooden hand-rest made in the shape like this for keeping their hand on. Take a look at the figures below.

of Lord Shiva shown below, the position of the hand rest is the right way to keep.

The hand-rest as shown in the above picture and the Kamandal (pot) were the 2 main accessories of sages in those days. The hand-rest in the shape of two snakes coiled together and looking away at the top, with a connecting rod in between them as a rest for the hand of the sage, is similar to what Asherah is holding in her hand. Not only this, any stick that the yogis and sages possessed used to be carved with a snake head!

Asherah is the female consort of Yahweh. In Hindu Thought Durga, the consort of Shiva blesses the devotee aspiring to do yogic meditation. In this role, Durga is called as Vishnu Durga who helps the devotee in this regard. These explanations are endless. But the concepts, ideas and interpretation for Asherah – Ishtar images found in Hindu Thought do indicate from where these ideas have sprung. Moreover Asherah was associated with tree and was worshiped as Tree Goddess, according to Hebrew Bible. (http://thequeenofheaven.wordpress.com/2010/10/27/asherah-part-i-the-lost-bride-of-yahweh/ ).

With the advent of Christianity, Asherah was wiped out from the memory of the people. Female Goddess along with images of snakes, installed under the trees is a Hindu concept that continues even today. Mayamatham, tells about the name of the tree unique for each of the Sapta Matas.

The association of tress and snakes for the Goddesses is not without meaning. The meaning is something which is applicable only to India. The meaning is such that there was a purpose of conservation of natural sources of water. India is dependent on seasonal rainfall which actually gets collected in underground water tables. The underground water links are called as water veins or jala nadi. Wells, tanks and lakes were dug where these water veins ran. The unique feature is that these underground water veins were identified by means of specific trees and ant-hills (where snakes live) and snake holes. There is a separate chapter on this, by giving the names of more than 50 trees of water veins, in the book “Brihad samhita” written by Varahamihira (written sometime between 1 st and 5 th century CE). For details: http://jayasreesaranathan.blogspot.in/2009/08/science-of-detecting-underground-water.html

These trees and ant hills provided the easy clues to identify water sources. The best way to make people preserve these trees and thereby the knowledge of presence of water veins was to install snake gods and female Goddesses under these trees. This is how the tree worship and snake worship under the trees came into existence.

This is relevant in a country like India having underground water veins, but not in other countries. In places like Sumeria or Levant (Lavana samudra / sea of salt), this kind combination of water veins with specific tress and snake holes do not exist. But presence of tree- snake- female goddess culture in these places about 2000 years ago only goes to show the spread of or adaptation of a similar culture from India. This tree-snake presence for identifying water veins existed in the Indus sites which was originally the site where river Saraswathy flowed. The proof of it is in the name of the sage with whim this theory is associated by Varahamihira in his book. The sage was “Saraswatha”. He got his name due to his association with the region of river Saraswathy. The loss of river bed of Saraswathy due to tectonic movements resulted in water crisis and it necessitated sage Saraswatha to look for clues to identify the places where the river water was concealed as underground water table. The following image found in Indus sites is perhaps the oldest available proof of female Goddess installed under a tree for worship.

The site where this was found could have been the region where water table was close to the surface for easy access.

Beyond this region, i.e., in the North West of India, this kind of tree- water table connection is unknown and not possible too. Such being the basis of tree- goddess-snake worship, an Asherah or any entity with similar concept anywhere outside India can only be an adaptation from Hindu ways of worship.

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Aliearia

GOOD SHEPHARD 4

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Last edited 2 months ago by Emmo827

Tridentine Mass

For the forms of the Mass liturgy prior to 1570, see Pre-Tridentine Mass.

Elevation of the chalice after the consecration during a Solemn Mass.

The Tridentine Mass is the Roman Rite Mass which appears in typical editions of the Roman Missal published from 1570 to 1962. [1] The most widely used Mass liturgy in the world until the introduction of the Mass of Paul VI in 1969, it is celebrated in Liturgical Latin. [2]

“Tridentine” is derived from the Latin Tridentinus, “related to the city of Tridentum” (modern-day Trent, Italy). In response to a decision of the Council of Trent [3] Pope Pius V promulgated the 1570 Roman Missal, making it mandatory throughout the Western Church, except in places and religious orders with missals from before 1370. [4]

In 2007, Pope Benedict XVI issued the motu proprio Summorum Pontificum, accompanied by a letter to the world’s bishops. The Pope stated that the 1962 edition of the Roman Missal is to be considered an “extraordinary form” (forma extraordinaria) [5] of the Roman Rite, of which the Missal as revised by Pope Paul VI in 1970 is the ordinary, normal or standard form. Since that is the only authorized extraordinary form, some refer to the 1962 Tridentine Mass as “the extraordinary form” of the Mass [6] The 1962 Tridentine Mass is sometimes referred to as the “usus antiquior” (older use) or “forma antiquior” (older form), [7] to differentiate it from the newer form of the Roman Rite in use since 1970, again in the sense of being the only one of the older forms for which authorization has been granted.

Other names used include Traditional Mass and Latin Mass, although the revised form of the Mass that replaced it has its official text in Latin and is sometimes celebrated in that language. [8][9]

In Masses celebrated without the people, Latin Rite Catholic priests are free to use either the 1962 version of the Tridentine liturgy or the “ordinary” (normal) form of the liturgy. These Masses “may — observing all the norms of law — also be attended by faithful who, of their own free will, ask to be admitted.” [10] Permission to use the Tridentine form in parish Masses may be given by the pastor or rector. [11]

In most countries, the language used for celebrating the Tridentine Mass was (and is) Latin. However, in Dalmatia and parts of Istria in Croatia, the liturgy was celebrated in Church Slavonic, and authorisation for use of this language was extended to some other Slavic regions between 1886 and 1935. [12][13]

After the publication of the 1962 edition of the Roman Missal, the 1964 Instruction on implementing the Constitution on Sacred Liturgy of the Second Vatican Council laid down that “normally the epistle and gospel from the Mass of the day shall be read in the vernacular”. Episcopal conferences were to decide, with the consent of the Holy See, what other parts, if any, of the Mass were to be celebrated in the vernacular. [14]

Outside the Roman Catholic Church, the vernacular language was introduced into the celebration of the Tridentine Mass by some Old Catholics and Anglo-Catholics with the introduction of the English Missal.

Some Western Rite Orthodox Christians, particularly in the Antiochian Orthodox Archdiocese of North America, use the Tridentine Mass in the vernacular with minor alterations under the title of the “Divine Liturgy of St. Gregory.”

Most Old Catholics use the Tridentine Mass, either in the vernacular or in Latin.

A pre-1969 Roman-Rite altar with reredos: A “high altar” (the main altar in the church) was usually preceded by three steps, below which were said the Prayers at the Foot of the Altar. “Side altars” usually had only one step. Leaning against the Tabernacle and two of the candlesticks are altar cards to remind the Celebrant of the words when he is away from the missal

Some Catholics prefer not to use the term “Tridentine Mass”. In some cases, the objection is that linking the rite specifically with the Council of Trent obscures its continuity with the form that developed in previous centuries. Others object that using separate terms for the pre-1970 and post-1970 liturgies (rather than classifying them both as forms of the same Roman Rite) implies that the post-1970 liturgy constituted a breach with the preceding form. Some Catholics use the term “Extraordinary Form” (see above).

The most widespread term for the rite, other than “Tridentine Mass”, is “Latin Mass”. However, the Mass of Paul VI is published in Latin in its official text, and is sometimes celebrated in that language. [15]

Occasionally the term “Gregorian Rite” is used when talking about the Tridentine Mass, [16] as is, more frequently, “Tridentine Rite”. [17] Pope Benedict XVI declared it inappropriate to speak of the versions of the Roman Missal of before and after 1970 as if they were two rites. Rather, he said, it is a matter of a twofold use of one and the same rite. [18]

Traditionalist Catholics, whose best-known characteristic is an attachment to the Tridentine Mass, frequently refer to it as the “Traditional Mass” or the “Traditional Latin Mass”. They describe as a “codifying” of the form of the Mass the preparation of Pope Pius V’s edition of the Roman Missal, of which he said that the experts to whom he had entrusted the work collated the existing text with ancient manuscripts and writings, restored it to “the original form and rite of the holy Fathers” and further emended it. [19] To distinguish this form of Mass from the Mass of Paul VI, traditionalist Catholics sometimes call it the “Mass of the Ages”, [20][21][22][23][24][25]

and say that it comes down to us “from the Church of the Apostles, and ultimately, indeed, from Him Who is its principal Priest and its spotless Victim”. [26][27]

At the time of the Council of Trent, the traditions preserved in printed and manuscript missals varied considerably, and standardization was sought both within individual dioceses and throughout the Latin West. Standardization was required also in order to prevent the introduction into the liturgy of Protestant ideas in the wake of the Protestant Reformation.

Pope St. Pius V accordingly imposed uniformity by law in 1570 with the papal bull “Quo primum”, ordering use of the Roman Missal as revised by him. [19] He allowed only those rites that were at least 200 years old to survive the promulgation of his 1570 Missal. Several of the rites that remained in existence were progressively abandoned, though the Ambrosian rite survives in Milan, Italy and neighbouring areas, stretching even into Switzerland, and the Mozarabic rite remains in use to a limited extent in Toledo and Madrid, Spain. The Carmelite, Carthusian and Dominican religious orders kept their rites, but in the second half of the 20th century two of these three chose to adopt the Roman Rite. The rite of Braga, in northern Portugal, seems to have been practically abandoned: since 18 November 1971 that archdiocese authorizes its use only on an optional basis. [28]

Beginning in the late 17th century, France and neighbouring areas, such as Münster, Cologne and Trier in Germany, saw a flurry of independent missals published by bishops influenced by Jansenism and Gallicanism. This ended when Abbot Guéranger and others initiated in the 19th century a campaign to return to the Roman Missal.

Pius V’s revision of the liturgy had as one of its declared aims the restoration of the Roman Missal “to the original form and rite of the holy Fathers”. [19]

Due to the relatively limited resources available to his scholars, this aim was in fact not realised. [29]

Three different printings of Pius V’s Roman Missal, with minor variations, appeared in 1570, a folio and a quarto edition in Rome and a folio edition in Venice. A reproduction of what is considered to be the earliest, referred to therefore as the editio princeps, was produced in 1998. [30] In the course of the printing of the editio princeps, some corrections were made by pasting revised texts over parts of the already printed pages. [31] There were several printings again in the following year 1571, with various corrections of the text. [32]

Missale Romanum in Croatian Glagolitic script printed in 1483

In the Apostolic Constitution (papal bull) Quo primum, with which he prescribed use of his 1570 edition of the Roman Missal, Pius V decreed: “We order and enjoin that nothing must be added to Our recently published Missal, nothing omitted from it, nor anything whatsoever be changed within it.” This of course did not exclude changes by a Pope, and Pope Pius V himself added to the Missal the feast of Our Lady of Victory, to celebrate the victory of Lepanto of 7 October 1571. His immediate successor, Pope Gregory XIII, changed the name of this feast to “The Most Holy Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary” and Pope John XXIII changed it to “Our Lady of the Rosary”.

Pius V’s work in severely reducing the number of feasts in the Roman Calendar (see this comparison) was very soon further undone by his successors. Feasts that he had abolished, such as those of the Presentation of Mary, Saint Anne and Saint Anthony of Padua, were restored even before Clement VIII’s 1604 typical edition of the Missal was issued.

In the course of the following centuries new feasts were repeatedly added and the ranks of certain feasts were raised or lowered. A comparison between Pope Pius V’s Tridentine Calendar and the General Roman Calendar of 1954 shows the changes made from 1570 to 1954. Pope Pius XII made a general revision in 1955, and Pope John XXIII made further general revisions in 1960 simplifying the terminology concerning the ranking of liturgical celebrations.

While keeping on 8 December what he called the feast of “the Conception of Blessed Mary” (omitting the word “Immaculate”), Pius V suppressed the existing special Mass for the feast, directing that the Mass for the Nativity of Mary (with the word “Nativity” replaced by “Conception”) be used instead. Part of that earlier Mass was revived in the Mass that Pope Pius IX ordered to be used on the feast.

Typical editions of the Roman Missal

Altar of Santa Cecilia in Trastevere, as arranged in 1700: [33] one of many churches in Rome whose altar, placed at the western end of the church, was positioned so that the priest necessarily faced east, and so towards the people, when celebrating Mass [34]

In addition to such occasional changes, the Roman Missal was subjected to general revisions whenever a new “typical edition” (an official edition whose text was to be reproduced in printings by all publishers) was issued.

After Pius V’s original Tridentine Roman Missal, the first new typical edition was promulgated in 1604 by Pope Clement VIII, who in 1592 had issued a revised edition of the Vulgate. The Bible texts in the Missal of Pope Pius V did not correspond exactly to the new Vulgate, and so Clement edited and revised Pope Pius V’s Missal, making alterations both in the scriptural texts and in other matters. He abolished some prayers that the 1570 Missal obliged the priest to say on entering the church; shortened the two prayers to be said after the Confiteor; directed that the words “Haec quotiescumque feceritis, in meam memoriam facietis” should not be said while displaying the chalice to the people after the consecration, but before doing so; inserted directions at several points of the Canon that the priest was to pronounce the words inaudibly; suppressed the rule that, at High Mass, the priest, even if not a bishop, was to give the final blessing with three signs of the cross; and rewrote the rubrics, introducing, for instance, the ringing of a small bell. [35]

The next typical edition was issued in 1634, when Pope Urban VIII made another general revision of the Roman Missal. [36]

There was no further typical edition until that of Pope Leo XIII in 1884. [37] It introduced only minor changes, not profound enough to merit having the papal bull of its promulgation included in the Missal, as the bulls of 1604 and 1634 were.

In 1911, with the bull Divino Afflatu, [38]

Pope Pius X made significant changes in the rubrics. He died in 1914, so it fell to his successor Pope Benedict XV to issue a new typical edition incorporating his changes. This 1920 edition included a new section headed: “Additions and Changes in the Rubrics of the Missal in accordance with the Bull Divino afflatu and the Subsequent Decrees of the Sacred Congregation of Rites”. This additional section was almost as long as the previous section on the “General Rubrics of the Missal”, which continued to be printed unchanged.

Pope Pius XII radically revised the Palm Sunday and Easter Triduum liturgy, suppressed many vigils and octaves and made other alterations in the calendar (see General Roman Calendar of Pope Pius XII), reforms that were completed in Pope John XXIII’s 1960 Code of Rubrics, which were incorporated in the final 1962 typical edition of the Tridentine Missal, replacing both Pius X’s “Additions and Changes in the Rubrics of the Missal” and the earlier “General Rubrics of the Missal”.

Changes made to the liturgy in 1965 and 1967 in the wake of decisions of the Second Vatican Council were not incorporated in the Roman Missal, but were reflected in the provisional vernacular translations produced when the language of the people began to be used in addition to Latin. This explains the references sometimes seen to “the 1965 Missal”.

The General Roman Calendar was revised partially in 1955 and 1960 and completely in 1969 in Pope Paul VI’s motu proprio Mysterii Paschalis, again reducing the number of feasts. [39]

The 1962 Missal

The Roman Missal issued by Pope John XXIII in 1962 differed from earlier editions in a number of ways.

It incorporated the change made by John XXIII in 1962, when he inserted into the canon of the Mass the name of Saint Joseph, the first change for centuries in the canon of the Mass. [40]

It incorporated major changes that Pope Pius XII made in 1955 in the liturgy of Palm Sunday and the Easter Triduum. These included: Abolition of the ceremonies whereby the blessing of palms on Palm Sunday resembled a Mass, with Epistle, Gospel, Preface and Sanctus; suppression of the knocking three times on the closed doors before returning to the church after the blessing and distribution of the palms; omission of the prayers at the foot of the altar and of the Last Gospel.

On Holy Thursday the washing of feet was incorporated into the Mass instead of being an independent ceremony; if done by a bishop, 12 men, not 13, had their feet washed; the Mass itself was said in the evening instead of the morning and some of its prayers were removed or altered.

On Good Friday, violet vestments were to be worn, instead of black; “Let us pray. Let us kneel. Arise” was added at the prayer for the Jews, and the adjective perfidis was removed (see Good Friday Prayer for the Jews); an afternoon Communion Service replaced the morning Mass of the Presanctified, at which the priest alone received the earlier-consecrated host, and drank unconsecrated wine into which a small portion of the consecrated host had been put.

The Easter Vigil was moved from Holy Saturday morning to the following nighttime; the use of a triple candle was abolished and other changes were made both to the initial ceremonies centred on the Paschal Candle and to other parts, such as the reduction from twelve to four of the prophecies read.

It incorporated the rubrical changes made by Pope Pius XII’s 1955 decree Cum nostra, which included: Vigils were abolished except those of Easter, Christmas, Ascension, Pentecost, Saints Peter and Paul, Saint John the Baptist, and Saint Lawrence;

all octaves were abolished except those of Easter, Christmas and Pentecost;

no more than three collects were to be said at low Mass and one at solemn Mass.

Its calendar incorporated both the changes made by Pope Pius XII in 1955 (General Roman Calendar of Pope Pius XII) and those introduced by Pope John XXIII himself with his 1960 Code of Rubrics (General Roman Calendar of 1960). These included: suppression of the “Solemnity of Saint Joseph, Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary” and its replacement by the feast of “Saint Joseph the Worker”;

removal of some duplicate feasts that appeared twice in earlier versions of the calendar, such as the Feast of the Cross, the Chair of Peter, Saint Peter, Saint John the Evangelist, Saint Michael, and Saint Stephen;

addition of feasts such as that of the Queenship of Mary.

It replaced the Roman Missal’s introductory sections, Rubricae generales Missalis (General Rubrics of the Missal) and Additiones et variationes in rubricis Missalis ad normam Bullae “Divino afflatu” et subsequentium S.R.C. Decretorum (Additions and alterations to the Rubrics of the Missal in line with the Bull Divino afflatu and the subsequent decrees of the Sacred Congregation of Rites), with the text of the General Rubrics and the General Rubrics of the Roman Missal parts of the 1960 Code of Rubrics.

Pope Benedict XVI authorized, under certain conditions, continued use of this 1962 edition of the Roman Missal as an extraordinary form of the Roman Rite, [41]

alongside the later form, introduced in 1970, which is now the normal or ordinary form. [42] Pre-1962 forms of the Roman Rite, which some individuals and groups employ, [43] are not authorized for liturgical use.

The Mass is divided into two parts, the Mass of the Catechumens and the Mass of the Faithful. Catechumens, those being instructed in the faith, [44] were once dismissed after the first half, not having yet professed the faith. Profession of faith was considered essential for participation in the Eucharistic sacrifice. [45]

This rule of the Didache is still in effect. It is only one of the three conditions (baptism, right faith and right living) for admission to receiving Holy Communion that the Catholic Church has always applied and that were already mentioned in the early 2nd century by Saint Justin Martyr: “And this food is called among us the Eucharist, of which no one is allowed to partake but the man who believes that the things which we teach are true, and who has been washed with the washing that is for the remission of sins, and unto regeneration, and who is so living as Christ has enjoined” (First Apology, Chapter LXVI).

Before Mass

Asperges (Sprinkling with holy water, Psalm 51:9, 3 ) is an optional penitential rite that ordinarily precedes only the principal Mass on Sunday. [46]

In the sacristy, a priest wearing an alb, if he is to celebrate the Mass, or surplice, if he is not the celebrant of the Mass, and vested with a stole, which is the color of the day if the priest is the celebrant of the Mass or purple if he is not the celebrant of the Mass, exorcises and blesses salt and water, then puts the blessed salt into the water by thrice sprinkling it in the form of a cross while saying once, “Commixtio salis et aquæ pariter fiat in nomine Patris, et Filii et Spiritus Sancti” (May a mixture of salt and water now be made in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit). After that, the priest, vested in a cope of the color of the day, while the choir sings an antiphon and a verse of Psalm 50/51 or 117/118, sprinkles with the holy water the altar three times, and then the clergy and the congregation. This rite, if used, precedes the Prayers at the Foot of the Altar. During the Easter season, the “Asperges me…” verse is replaced by the “Vidi aquam…” verse, and “Alleluia” is added to the “Ostende nobis…” verse and to its response.

Following the Asperges, Mass begins.

Mass of the Catechumens

The first part is the Mass of the Catechumens. [47]

Prayers at the foot of the altar

Prayers at the foot of the altar

Sign of the Cross The priest, after processing in — at solemn Mass with deacon, and subdeacon, master of ceremonies and servers, and at other Masses with one or more servers — and at Low Mass placing the veiled chalice on the centre of the altar, makes the sign of the Cross at the foot of the altar. At Solemn Mass, the chalice is placed beforehand on the credence table.

Psalm 42 (“Iudica me, Deus”), preceded and followed by the antiphon “Introibo ad altare Dei, ad Deum qui lætificat iuventutem meam” (Translation: “I shall go in to the altar of God, the God who gives joy to my youth”), is recited by the priest, alternating with the deacon and subdeacon (if present) or servers. Then the priest makes again the sign of the Cross, saying: “Our help is in the name of the Lord”, to which the servers add: “Who made heaven and earth.”

Confession (Confiteor) First the priest says the following while bowing low:

“Confíteor Deo omnipoténti, beátæ Maríæ semper Vírgini, beáto Michaéli Archángelo, beáto Ioanni Baptístæ, sanctis Apóstolis Petro et Paulo, ómnibus Sanctis, et vobis, fratres (tibi, Pater), quia peccávi nimis cogitatióne, verbo et ópere: mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa. Ideo precor beátam Maríam semper Vírginem, beátum Michaélem Archángelum, beátum Ioánnem Baptístam, sanctos Apóstolos Petrum et Paulum, omnes Sanctos, et vos, fratres (te, Pater), oráre pro me ad Dóminum Deum nostrum.” (Translation: I confess to almighty God, to blessed Mary ever Virgin, to blessed Michael the archangel, to blessed John the Baptist, to the holy apostles Peter and Paul, to all the saints, and to you, brethren, that I have sinned exceedingly in thought, word, and deed through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault. Therefore I beseech blessed Mary ever Virgin … and you, brethren, to pray to the Lord our God for me.) The servers pray for the priest: “May Almighty God have mercy on thee, forgive thee thy sins, and bring thee to life everlasting.” Then it is the ministers’ or servers’ turn to confess sinfulness and to ask for prayers. They use the same words as those used by the priest, except that they say “you, Father,” in place of “you, brethren”, and the priest responds with the same prayer that the servers have used for him (but using the plural number) plus an extra prayer.

Some verses are then said by priest and ministers (or servers), ending with the priest saying: “Oremus” (“Let us pray.”) After this he goes to the altar, praying silently “that with pure minds we may worthily enter into the holy of holies”, a reference to Exodus 26:33-34 , 1 Kings (or 3 Kings) 6:16 , 1 Kings (or 3 Kings) 8:6 , 2 Chronicles (or 2 Paralipomenon) 3:8 , Ezekiel 41:4 , and others. He places his joined hands on the edge of the altar, so that only the tips of the small fingers touch the front of it, and silently prays that, by the merits of the Saints whose relics are in the altar, God may pardon all his sins. At the words “quorum relíquiæ hic sunt” (whose relics are here), he spreads his hands and kisses the altar.

Priest at the altar

Dominus vobiscum (“The Lord be with you”) before the Collect. In the Tridentine Mass the priest should keep his eyes downcast at this point. [48]

Introit The priest again makes the sign of the Cross while he begins to read the Introit, which is usually taken from a Psalm. Exceptions occur: e.g. the Introit for Easter Sunday is adapted from Wis 10:20-21 , and the antiphon in Masses of the Blessed Virgin Mary was from the poet Sedulius. This evolved from the practice of singing a full Psalm, interspersed with the antiphon, during the entrance of the clergy, before the Prayers at the Foot of the Altar were added to the Mass in medieval times. This is indicated by the very name of “Introit”.

Kyrie This part of Mass is a linguistic marker of the origins of the Roman liturgy in Greek. “Kyrie, eleison; Christe, eleison; Kyrie, eleison.” means “Lord, have mercy; Christ have mercy;…” Each phrase is said (or sung) three times.

Gloria in excelsis Deo The first line of the Gloria [49] is taken from Lk 2:14 . The Gloria is omitted during liturgical seasons calling for penitence, such as Advent and Lent, both generally having the liturgical color violet, but is used on feasts falling during such seasons, as well as on Holy Thursday. It is always omitted for a Requiem Mass.

The Collect The priest turns toward the people and says, “Dominus vobiscum.” The servers respond: “Et cum spiritu tuo.” (“The Lord be with you.” “And with thy spirit”). The Collect follows, a prayer not drawn directly from Scripture. It tends to reflect the season.

Instruction

The priest reads the Epistle, primarily an extract from the letters of St. Paul to various churches. In his motu proprio Summorum Pontificum, Pope Benedict XVI has permitted this to be read in the vernacular language when Mass is celebrated with the people. [50]

Between the Epistle and the Gospel two (rarely three) choir responses are sung or said. Usually these are a Gradual followed by an Alleluia; but between Septuagesima Sunday and Holy Saturday, or in a Requiem Mass or other penitential Mass the Alleluia is replaced by a Tract, and between Easter Sunday and Pentecost the Gradual is replaced by a second Alleluia. On a few exceptional occasions (most notably Easter, Pentecost, Corpus Christi, and in a Requiem Mass), a Sequence follows the Alleluia or Tract. The Gradual is partly composed of a portion of a Psalm.

The Gospel reading, an extract from one of the four Gospels Before the reading or chanting of the Gospel, the priest prays: “Cleanse my heart and my lips, O almighty God, who didst cleanse the lips of the prophet Isaias…”, a reference to Isaiah 6:6 . In this passage, after being cleansed by the angel, Isaiah was instructed to prophesy.

The Sermon The rite of Mass as revised by Pope Pius V (the Tridentine Mass) does not consider a sermon obligatory and speaks of it instead as merely optional: it presumes that the Creed, if it is to be said, will follow the Gospel immediately, but adds: “If, however, someone is to preach, the Homilist, after the Gospel has been finished, preaches, and when the sermon or moral address has been completed, the Credo is said, or if it is not to be said, the Offertory is sung.” [51] By contrast the Roman Missal as revised by Pope Paul VI declares that the homily may not be omitted without a grave reason from Mass celebrated with the people attending on Sundays and Holydays of Obligation and that it is recommended on other days. [52]

The Creed This is the Nicene Creed, professing faith in God the Father, in God the Son, the Word made flesh, in God the Holy Ghost, and in the Holy Church. At the mention of the Incarnation, the celebrant and the congregation genuflect.

Mass of the Faithful

The second part is the Mass of the Faithful. [53]

Offertory

Offertory Verse After greeting the people once more (“Dominus vobiscum/Et cum spiritu tuo”) and giving the invitation to pray (Oremus), the priest enters upon the Mass of the Faithful, from which the non-baptized were once excluded. He reads the Offertory Verse, a short quotation from Holy Scripture which varies with the Mass of each day, with hands joined.

Offering of Bread and Wine The priest offers the host, holding it on the paten at breast level and praying that, although he is unworthy, God may accept “this spotless host (or victim, the basic meaning of hostia in Latin) for his own innumerable sins, offences and neglects, for all those present, and for all faithful Christians living and dead, that it may avail unto salvation of himself and those mentioned. He then mixes a few drops of water with the wine, which will later become the Blood of Jesus, and holding the chalice so that the lip of the chalice is about the height of his lips, offers “the chalice of salvation”, asking that it may “ascend with a sweet fragrance.” He then prays a prayer of contrition adapted from Dan 3:39-40 .

Incensing of the offerings and of the faithful At a High Mass, the priest blesses the incense, then incenses the bread and wine. Among the prayers the priest says is Psalm 141:2-4 : “Let my prayer, O Lord, be directed as incense in Thy sight;…”, which is prayed as he incenses the altar. The priest then gives the thurible to the deacon, who incenses the priest, then the other ministers and the congregation.

Washing the hands The priest prays Psalm 26:6-12 : “I will wash my hands among the innocent…”

Prayer to the Most Holy Trinity This prayer asks that the Divine Trinity may receive the oblation being made in remembrance of the passion, resurrection and ascension of Jesus and in honour of blessed Mary ever Virgin and the other saints, “that it may avail to their honour and our salvation: and that they may vouchsafe to intercede for us in heaven…”

Orate fratres, Suscipiat and Secret; Amen concludes Offertory Here the priest turns to the congregation and says the first two words, “Orate, fratres,” in an elevated tone and then turns around while finishing the exhortation in the secret tone. “Pray, Brethren, that my sacrifice and yours may be acceptable to God the Father almighty.”

The altar servers respond with the Suscipiat to which the priest secretly responds, “Amen.”: Suscipiat Dominus sacrificium de manibus tuis, ad laudem et gloriam nominis sui, ad utilitatem quoque nostram, totiusque ecclesiæ suae sanctæ. A translation in the English is: “May the Lord accept this sacrifice at your hands, to the praise and glory of His name, for our good and the good of all His Holy Church.”

The Priest then says the day’s Secret inaudibly, and concludes it with Per omnia sæcula sæculorum aloud.

The altar servers and (in dialogue Mass) the congregation respond: “Amen.”

Consecration

Preface of the Canon “The Roman Canon dates in essentials from before St. Gregory the Great, who died in 604, and who is credited with adding a phrase to it. [54]

(See History of the Roman Canon.) It contains the main elements found in almost all rites, but in an unusual arrangement and it is unclear which part should be considered to be the Epiclesis.

Dominus vobiscum. Et cum spiritu tuo. Sursum corda. Habemus ad Dominum. Gratias agamus Domino Deo nostro. Dignum et iustum est. The first part can be seen above at the Collect; the rest means: Lift up your hearts. We lift them up to the Lord. Let us give thanks to the Lord our God. It is right and just.

Next a preface is prayed, indicating specific reasons for giving thanks to God. This leads to the Sanctus. [55]

Canon or rule of consecration [56]

Intercession (corresponding to the reading of the diptychs in the Byzantine Rite — a diptych is a two-leaf painting, carving or writing tablet. [57] ) Here the priest prays for the living, that God may guard, unite and govern the Church together with the Pope and “all those who, holding to the truth, hand on the catholic and apostolic faith”. Then specific living people are mentioned, and the congregation in the church. Next, Mary ever Virgin, Saint Joseph, the Apostles, and some Popes and other Martyrs are mentioned by name, as well as a generic “and all your Saints”, in communion with whom prayer is offered.

Prayers preparatory to the consecration A prayer that God may graciously accept the offering and “command that we be delivered from eternal damnation and counted among the flock of those you have chosen”.

Consecration (transubstantiation) and major elevation

Elevation of the chalice during the Canon of the Mass at a Solemn Mass

The passage Lk 22:19-20 is key in this section. In Summa Theologiae III 78 3 Thomas Aquinas addresses the interspersed phrase, “the mystery of faith”. On this phrase, see Mysterium fidei.

Oblation of the victim to God An oblation is an offering; [58] the pure, holy, spotless victim is now offered, with a prayer that God may accept the offering and command his holy angel to carry the offering to God’s altar on high, so that those who receive the Body and Blood of Christ “may be filled with every grace and heavenly blessing”.

Remembrance of the Dead The priest now prays for the dead (“those who have gone before us with the sign of faith and rest in the sleep of peace”) and asks that they be granted a place of refreshment, light and peace. This is followed by a prayer that we be granted fellowship with the Saints. John the Baptist and fourteen martyrs, seven men and seven women, are mentioned by name.

End of the Canon and doxology with minor elevation The concluding doxology is: “Through him, and with him, and in him, O God, almighty Father, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, all glory and honour is yours, for ever and ever.” “Amen” ratifies the Canon prayer.

Beuron Art School representation of an elevation candle, mistakenly placed at the Gospel side and upon the altar

The elevation candle

Until 1960, the Tridentine form of the Roman Missal laid down that a candle should be placed at the Epistle side of the altar and that it should be lit at the showing of the consecrated sacrament to the people. [59] In practice, except in monasteries and on special occasions, this had fallen out of use long before Pope John XXIII replaced the section on the general rubrics of the Roman Missal with his Code of Rubrics, which no longer mentioned this custom. On this, see Elevation candle.

Communion

Before receiving Communion from the chalice, the priest makes the sign of the cross over himself, saying (in Latin): May the Blood of our Lord Jesus Christ keep my soul for eternal life. Amen.

The Lord’s Prayer and Libera nos [60]

The “Libera nos” is an extension of the Lord’s Prayer developing the line “sed libera nos a malo” (“but deliver us from evil”). The priest prays that we may be delivered from all evils and that the Virgin Mary, Mother of God, together with the apostles and saints, may intercede to obtain for us peace in our day.

Fraction of the Host During the preceding prayer, the priest breaks the consecrated Host into three parts, and after concluding the prayer drops the smallest part into the Chalice while praying that this commingling and consecration of the Body and Blood of Christ may “be to us who receive it effectual to life everlasting.”

Agnus Dei “Agnus Dei” means “Lamb of God”. The priest then prays: “Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.” He repeats this, and then adds: “Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world, grant us peace.” The Mass of the Last Supper on Holy Thursday has “have mercy on us” all three times. In Requiem Masses, the petitions are “grant them rest” (twice), followed by “grant them eternal rest.”

The Pax The priest asks Christ to look not at the priest’s sins but at the faith of Christ’s Church, and prays for peace and unity within the Church. Then, if a High Mass is being celebrated, he gives the sign of peace to the deacon, saying: “Peace be with you.”

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Aliearia

GEORGIA GUIDESTONE 3 Good Shephard Friday

153 SACRED GEOMETRY IN ARCHITECTURE

Good Shepherd Sunday is the Fourth Sunday of Easter in the Catholic liturgical calendar; that is, the Sunday three weeks after Easter Sunday. The name derives from the gospel readings on this day, which are taken from the 10th chapter of John. In this reading Christ is described as the Good Shepherd who, by dying on the Cross, lays down his life for his sheep. In the Traditional (pre-1970) Latin Liturgy (see Tridentine Mass), this Mass is said on the Second Sunday after Easter, i.e., the Sunday after “Low Week” (the week after the Octave of Easter, beginning with Quasimodo or “Low” Sunday).

In recent times the feast day has also become known as Vocations Sunday, a day on which prayers should be said for vocations to the priesthood and religious life.

Other liturgical churches that follow the Revised Common Lectionary, such as Lutherans, United Methodists, Presbyterians, Anglicans, and others also read the “Good Shepherd” passage from John chapter 10 on the Fourth Sunday of Easter and some also call this day “Good Shepherd Sunday.”

MASS ON 3rd/4th SUNDAY AFTER EASTER

Elevation of the chalice after the consecration during a Solemn Mass.

The Tridentine Mass is the Roman Rite Mass which appears in typical editions of the Roman Missal published from 1570 to 1962. [1] The most widely used Mass liturgy in the world until the introduction of the Mass of Paul VI in 1969, it is celebrated in Liturgical Latin. [2]

“Tridentine” is derived from the Latin Tridentinus, “related to the city of Tridentum” (modern-day Trent, Italy). In response to a decision of the Council of Trent [3] Pope Pius V promulgated the 1570 Roman Missal, making it mandatory throughout the Western Church, except in places and religious orders with missals from before 1370. [4]

TRIDENT DEFINITION:image

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1. Poseidon aka Neptune’s 3 pronged fork shaped rod/spear

2. a US design of submarine-launched long-range ballistic missile.

3. Roman History. a three-pronged spear used by a retiarius in gladiatorial combats.

In 2007, Pope Benedict XVI issued the motu proprio Summorum Pontificum, accompanied by a letter to the world’s bishops. The Pope stated that the 1962 edition of the Roman Missal is to be considered an “extraordinary form” (forma extraordinaria) [5] of the Roman Rite, of which the Missal as revised by Pope Paul VI in 1970 is the ordinary, normal or standard form. Since that is the only authorized extraordinary form, some refer to the 1962 Tridentine Mass as “the extraordinary form” of the Mass [6] The 1962 Tridentine Mass is sometimes referred to as the “usus antiquior” (older use) or “forma antiquior” (older form), [7] to differentiate it from the newer form of the Roman Rite in use since 1970, again in the sense of being the only one of the older forms for which authorization has been granted.

Other names used include Traditional Mass and Latin Mass, although the revised form of the Mass that replaced it has its official text in Latin and is sometimes celebrated in that language. [8][9]

In Masses celebrated without the people, Latin Rite Catholic priests are free to use either the 1962 version of the Tridentine liturgy or the “ordinary” (normal) form of the liturgy. These Masses “may — observing all the norms of law — also be attended by faithful who, of their own free will, ask to be admitted.” [10] Permission to use the Tridentine form in parish Masses may be given by the pastor or rector.

LANGUAGE

In most countries, the language used for celebrating the Tridentine Mass was (and is) Latin. However, in Dalmatia and parts of Istria in Croatia, the liturgy was celebrated in Church Slavonic, and authorisation for use of this language was extended to some other Slavic regions between 1886 and 1935. [12][13]

After the publication of the 1962 edition of the Roman Missal, the 1964 Instruction on implementing the Constitution on Sacred Liturgy of the Second Vatican Council laid down that “normally the epistle and gospel from the Mass of the day shall be read in the vernacular”. Episcopal conferences were to decide, with the consent of the Holy See, what other parts, if any, of the Mass were to be celebrated in the vernacular. [14]

Outside the Roman Catholic Church, the vernacular language was introduced into the celebration of the Tridentine Mass by some Old Catholics and Anglo-Catholics with the introduction of the English Missal.

Some Western Rite Orthodox Christians, particularly in the Antiochian Orthodox Archdiocese of North America, use the Tridentine Mass in the vernacular with minor alterations under the title of the “Divine Liturgy of St. Gregory.”

Most Old Catholics use the Tridentine Mass, either in the vernacular or in Latin.

TERMINOLOGY

A pre-1969 Roman-Rite altar with reredos: A “high altar” (the main altar in the church) was usually preceded by three steps, below which were said the Prayers at the Foot of the Altar. “Side altars” usually had only one step. Leaning against the Tabernacle and two of the candlesticks are altar cards to remind the Celebrant of the words when he is away from the missal

Some Catholics prefer not to use the term “Tridentine Mass”. In some cases, the objection is that linking the rite specifically with the Council of Trent obscures its continuity with the form that developed in previous centuries. Others object that using separate terms for the pre-1970 and post-1970 liturgies (rather than classifying them both as forms of the same Roman Rite) implies that the post-1970 liturgy constituted a breach with the preceding form. Some Catholics use the term “Extraordinary Form” (see above).

The most widespread term for the rite, other than “Tridentine Mass”, is “Latin Mass”. However, the Mass of Paul VI is published in Latin in its official text, and is sometimes celebrated in that language. [15]

Occasionally the term “Gregorian Rite” is used when talking about the Tridentine Mass, [16] as is, more frequently, “Tridentine Rite”. [17] Pope Benedict XVI declared it inappropriate to speak of the versions of the Roman Missal of before and after 1970 as if they were two rites. Rather, he said, it is a matter of a twofold use of one and the same rite. [18]

Traditionalist Catholics, whose best-known characteristic is an attachment to the Tridentine Mass, frequently refer to it as the “Traditional Mass” or the “Traditional Latin Mass”. They describe as a “codifying” of the form of the Mass the preparation of Pope Pius V’s edition of the Roman Missal, of which he said that the experts to whom he had entrusted the work collated the existing text with ancient manuscripts and writings, restored it to “the original form and rite of the holy Fathers” and further emended it. [19] To distinguish this form of Mass from the Mass of Paul VI, traditionalist Catholics sometimes call it the “Mass of the Ages”, [20][21][22][23][24][25]

and say that it comes down to us “from the Church of the Apostles, and ultimately, indeed, from Him Who is its principal Priest and its spotless Victim”.

At the time of the Council of Trent, the traditions preserved in printed and manuscript missals varied considerably, and standardization was sought both within individual dioceses and throughout the Latin West. Standardization was required also in order to prevent the introduction into the liturgy of Protestant ideas in the wake of the Protestant Reformation.

Pope St. Pius V accordingly imposed uniformity by law in 1570 with the papal bull “Quo primum”, ordering use of the Roman Missal as revised by him. [19]

image

image

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GENESIS 15: CALF/OX/BULL/TAURUS/OX

image

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BIG DIPPER, POT, PLEIADES, 7 STARS, 7 ANGELS, 7 BOWLS, 7 TRUMPETS

REVELATION 1:20

He allowed only those rites that were at least 200 years old to survive the promulgation of his 1570 Missal. Several of the rites that remained in existence were progressively abandoned, though the Ambrosian rite survives in Milan, Italy and neighbouring areas, stretching even into Switzerland, and the Mozarabic rite remains in use to a limited extent in Toledo and Madrid, Spain. The Carmelite, Carthusian and Dominican religious orders kept their rites, but in the second half of the 20th century two of these three chose to adopt the Roman Rite. The rite of Braga, in northern Portugal, seems to have been practically abandoned: since 18 November 1971 that archdiocese authorizes its use only on an optional basis. [28]

Beginning in the late 17th century, France and neighbouring areas, such as Münster, Cologne and Trier in Germany, saw a flurry of independent missals published by bishops influenced by Jansenism and Gallicanism. This ended when Abbot Guéranger and others initiated in the 19th century a campaign to return to the Roman Missal.

Pius V’s revision of the liturgy had as one of its declared aims the restoration of the Roman Missal “to the original form and rite of the holy Fathers”. [19]

Due to the relatively limited resources available to his scholars, this aim was in fact not realised. [29]

Three different printings of Pius V’s Roman Missal, with minor variations, appeared in 1570, a folio and a quarto edition in Rome and a folio edition in Venice. A reproduction of what is considered to be the earliest, referred to therefore as the editio princeps, was produced in 1998. [30] In the course of the printing of the editio princeps, some corrections were made by pasting revised texts over parts of the already printed pages. [31] There were several printings again in the following year 1571, with various corrections of the text.

Missale Romanum in Croatian Glagolitic script printed in 1483

In the Apostolic Constitution (papal bull) Quo primum, with which he prescribed use of his 1570 edition of the Roman Missal, Pius V decreed: “We order and enjoin that nothing must be added to Our recently published Missal, nothing omitted from it, nor anything whatsoever be changed within it.” This of course did not exclude changes by a Pope, and Pope Pius V himself added to the Missal the feast of Our Lady of Victory, to celebrate the victory of Lepanto of 7 October 1571. His immediate successor, Pope Gregory XIII, changed the name of this feast to “The Most Holy Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary” and Pope John XXIII changed it to “Our Lady of the Rosary”.

Pius V’s work in severely reducing the number of feasts in the Roman Calendar (see this comparison) was very soon further undone by his successors. Feasts that he had abolished, such as those of the Presentation of Mary, Saint Anne and Saint Anthony of Padua, were restored even before Clement VIII’s 1604 typical edition of the Missal was issued.

In the course of the following centuries new feasts were repeatedly added and the ranks of certain feasts were raised or lowered. A comparison between Pope Pius V’s Tridentine Calendar and the General Roman Calendar of 1954 shows the changes made from 1570 to 1954. Pope Pius XII made a general revision in 1955, and Pope John XXIII made further general revisions in 1960 simplifying the terminology concerning the ranking of liturgical celebrations.

While keeping on 8 December what he called the feast of “the Conception of Blessed Mary” (omitting the word “Immaculate”), Pius V suppressed the existing special Mass for the feast, directing that the Mass for the Nativity of Mary (with the word “Nativity” replaced by “Conception”) be used instead. Part of that earlier Mass was revived in the Mass that Pope Pius IX ordered to be used on the feast.

Typical editions of the Roman Missal

Altar of Santa Cecilia in Trastevere, as arranged in 1700: [33] one of many churches in Rome whose altar, placed at the western end of the church, was positioned so that the priest necessarily faced east, and so towards the people, when celebrating Mass [34]

In addition to such occasional changes, the Roman Missal was subjected to general revisions whenever a new “typical edition” (an official edition whose text was to be reproduced in printings by all publishers) was issued.

After Pius V’s original Tridentine Roman Missal, the first new typical edition was promulgated in 1604 by Pope Clement VIII, who in 1592 had issued a revised edition of the Vulgate. The Bible texts in the Missal of Pope Pius V did not correspond exactly to the new Vulgate, and so Clement edited and revised Pope Pius V’s Missal, making alterations both in the scriptural texts and in other matters. He abolished some prayers that the 1570 Missal obliged the priest to say on entering the church; shortened the two prayers to be said after the Confiteor; directed that the words “Haec quotiescumque feceritis, in meam memoriam facietis” should not be said while displaying the chalice to the people after the consecration, but before doing so; inserted directions at several points of the Canon that the priest was to pronounce the words inaudibly; suppressed the rule that, at High Mass, the priest, even if not a bishop, was to give the final blessing with three signs of the cross; and rewrote the rubrics, introducing, for instance, the ringing of a small bell. [35]

The next typical edition was issued in 1634, when Pope Urban VIII made another general revision of the Roman Missal. [36]

There was no further typical edition until that of Pope Leo XIII in 1884. [37] It introduced only minor changes, not profound enough to merit having the papal bull of its promulgation included in the Missal, as the bulls of 1604 and 1634 were.

In 1911, with the bull Divino Afflatu, [38]

Pope Pius X made significant changes in the rubrics. He died in 1914, so it fell to his successor Pope Benedict XV to issue a new typical edition incorporating his changes. This 1920 edition included a new section headed: “Additions and Changes in the Rubrics of the Missal in accordance with the Bull Divino afflatu and the Subsequent Decrees of the Sacred Congregation of Rites”. This additional section was almost as long as the previous section on the “General Rubrics of the Missal”, which continued to be printed unchanged.

Pope Pius XII radically revised the Palm Sunday and Easter Triduum liturgy, suppressed many vigils and octaves and made other alterations in the calendar (see General Roman Calendar of Pope Pius XII), reforms that were completed in Pope John XXIII’s 1960 Code of Rubrics, which were incorporated in the final 1962 typical edition of the Tridentine Missal, replacing both Pius X’s “Additions and Changes in the Rubrics of the Missal” and the earlier “General Rubrics of the Missal”.

Changes made to the liturgy in 1965 and 1967 in the wake of decisions of the Second Vatican Council were not incorporated in the Roman Missal, but were reflected in the provisional vernacular translations produced when the language of the people began to be used in addition to Latin. This explains the references sometimes seen to “the 1965 Missal”.

The General Roman Calendar was revised partially in 1955 and 1960 and completely in 1969 in Pope Paul VI’s motu proprio Mysterii Paschalis, again reducing the number of feasts. [39]

The 1962 Missal

The Roman Missal issued by Pope John XXIII in 1962 differed from earlier editions in a number of ways.

It incorporated the change made by John XXIII in 1962, when he inserted into the canon of the Mass the name of Saint Joseph, the first change for centuries in the canon of the Mass. [40]

It incorporated major changes that Pope Pius XII made in 1955 in the liturgy of Palm Sunday and the Easter Triduum. These included: Abolition of the ceremonies whereby the blessing of palms on Palm Sunday resembled a Mass, with Epistle, Gospel, Preface and Sanctus; suppression of the knocking three times on the closed doors before returning to the church after the blessing and distribution of the palms; omission of the prayers at the foot of the altar and of the Last Gospel.

On Holy Thursday the washing of feet was incorporated into the Mass instead of being an independent ceremony; if done by a bishop, 12 men, not 13, had their feet washed; the Mass itself was said in the evening instead of the morning and some of its prayers were removed or altered.

On Good Friday, violet vestments were to be worn, instead of black; “Let us pray. Let us kneel. Arise” was added at the prayer for the Jews, and the adjective perfidis was removed (see Good Friday Prayer for the Jews); an afternoon Communion Service replaced the morning Mass of the Presanctified, at which the priest alone received the earlier-consecrated host, and drank unconsecrated wine into which a small portion of the consecrated host had been put.

The Easter Vigil was moved from Holy Saturday morning to the following nighttime; the use of a triple candle was abolished and other changes were made both to the initial ceremonies centred on the Paschal Candle and to other parts, such as the reduction from twelve to four of the prophecies read.

It incorporated the rubrical changes made by Pope Pius XII’s 1955 decree Cum nostra, which included: Vigils were abolished except those of Easter, Christmas, Ascension, Pentecost, Saints Peter and Paul, Saint John the Baptist, and Saint Lawrence;

all octaves were abolished except those of Easter, Christmas and Pentecost;

no more than three collects were to be said at low Mass and one at solemn Mass.

Its calendar incorporated both the changes made by Pope Pius XII in 1955 (General Roman Calendar of Pope Pius XII) and those introduced by Pope John XXIII himself with his 1960 Code of Rubrics (General Roman Calendar of 1960). These included: suppression of the “Solemnity of Saint Joseph, Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary” and its replacement by the feast of “Saint Joseph the Worker”;

removal of some duplicate feasts that appeared twice in earlier versions of the calendar, such as the Feast of the Cross, the Chair of Peter, Saint Peter, Saint John the Evangelist, Saint Michael, and Saint Stephen;

addition of feasts such as that of the Queenship of Mary.

It replaced the Roman Missal’s introductory sections, Rubricae generales Missalis (General Rubrics of the Missal) and Additiones et variationes in rubricis Missalis ad normam Bullae “Divino afflatu” et subsequentium S.R.C. Decretorum (Additions and alterations to the Rubrics of the Missal in line with the Bull Divino afflatu and the subsequent decrees of the Sacred Congregation of Rites), with the text of the General Rubrics and the General Rubrics of the Roman Missal parts of the 1960 Code of Rubrics.

Pope Benedict XVI authorized, under certain conditions, continued use of this 1962 edition of the Roman Missal as an extraordinary form of the Roman Rite, [41]

alongside the later form, introduced in 1970, which is now the normal or ordinary form. [42] Pre-1962 forms of the Roman Rite, which some individuals and groups employ, [43] are not authorized for liturgical use.

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GEORGIA GUIDESTONE 2 Rejected Stone

PSALM 118 Fourth Sunday after Easter

 Psalm 118:21 Psalm 118:23 

EXPOSITION

This passage ( Psalms 118:22-27 ) will appear to be a mixture of the expressions of the people and of the hero himself.

Verse 22. The stone which the builders refused is become the head stone of the corner. Here the people magnify God for bringing his chosen servant into the honourable office, which had been allotted to him by divine decree. A wise king and valiant leader is a stone by which the national fabric is built up. David had been rejected by those in authority, but God had placed him in a position of the highest honour and the greatest usefulness, making him the chief cornerstone of the state. In the case of many others whose early life has been spent in conflict, the Lord has been pleased to accomplish his divine purposes in like manner; but to none is this text so applicable as to the Lord Jesus himself: he is the living stone, the tried stone, elect, precious, which God himself appointed from of old. The Jewish builders, scribe, priest, Pharisee, and Herodian, rejected him with disdain. They could see no excellence in him that they should build upon him; he could not be made to fit in with their ideal of a national church, he was a stone of another quarry from themselves, and not after their mind nor according to their taste; therefore they cast him away and poured contempt upon him, even as Peter said, “This is the stone which was set at nought of you builders”; they reckoned him to be as nothing, though he is Lord of all.

There has been many deaths and resurrections of “Gods” throughout the course of human history. The sacred stone geometry is NOT limited to the Bible.

REVELATION 2:17

SACRED GEOMETRY IN ARCHITECTURE = 153

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In raising him from the dead the Lord God exalted him to be the head of his church, the very pinnacle of her glory and beauty. Since then he has become the confidence of the Gentiles, even of them that are afar off upon the sea, and thus he has joined the two walls of Jew and Gentile into one stately temple, and is seen to be the binding cornerstone, making both one. This is a delightful subject for contemplation.

Jesus in all things hath the preeminence, he is the principal stone of the whole house of God. We are accustomed to lay some one stone of a public building with solemn ceremony, and to deposit in it any precious things which may have been selected as a memorial of the occasion: henceforth that cornerstone is looked upon as peculiarly honourable, and joyful memories are associated with it. All this is in a very emphatic sense true of our blessed Lord, “The Shepherd, the Stone of Israel.” God himself laid him where he is, and hid within him all the precious things of the eternal covenant; and there he shall for ever remain, the foundation of all our hopes, the glory of all our joys, the united bond of all our fellowship. He is “the head over all things to the church,” and by him the church is fitly framed together, and groweth unto a holy temple in the Lord. Still do the builders refuse him: even to this day the professional teachers of the gospel are far too apt to fly to any and every new philosophy sooner than maintain the simple gospel, which is the essence of Christ: nevertheless, he holds his true position amongst his people, and the foolish builders shall see to their utter confusion that his truth shall be exalted over all. Those who reject the chosen stone will stumble against him to their own hurt, and ere long will come his second advent, when he will fall upon them from the heights of heaven, and grind them to powder.

EXPLANATORY NOTES AND QUAINT SAYINGS

Verse 22. The stone. The head stone of the corner. Christ Jesus is a stone: no firmness, but in him. A fundamental stone: no building, but on him. A corner stone: no piecing nor reconciliation, but in him. James Ford, 1856.

Verse 22. The stone which the builders rejected, etc. To apply it to Christ, “The Stone” is the ground of all. Two things befall it; two things as contrary as may be, —

1. Refused, cast away; then, called for again, and made head of the building. So, two parts there are to the eye. 2. The refusing; 3. The raising; which are his two estates, his humiliation, and his exaltation. In either of these you may observe two degrees, a quibus, and quosque, by whom and how far. By whom refused? We weigh the word, aeificantes: not by men unskilful, but by workmen, professed builders; it is so much the worse. How far? We weigh the word, –reprobaverunt; usque ad reprobari, even to a reprobation. It is not improbaverunt, disliked, as not fit for some eminent place; but reprobaverunt, utterly reprobate, for any place at all.

Again, exalted, by whom? The next words are a Domino, by God, as good a builder, nay, better than the best of them; which makes amends for the former. And How far? Placed by him, not in any part of the building; but in the part most in the eye (the corner), and in the highest place of it, the very head.

So, rejected, and that by the builders, and to the lowest estate: and from the lowest estate exalted in caput anguli, to the chiefest place of all; and that by God himself. Lancelot Andrewes.

Verse 22. The stone which the builders refused, etc. We need not wonder, that not only the powers of the world are usually enemies to Christ, and that the contrivers of policies, those builders, leave out Christ in their building, but that the pretended builders of the church of God, though they use the name of Christ, and serve their turn with that, yet reject himself, and oppose the power of his spiritual kingdom. There may be wit and learning, and much knowledge of the Scriptures, amongst those that are haters of the Lord Jesus Christ, and of the power of godliness, and corrupters of the worship of God. It is the spirit of humility and obedience, and saving faith, that teach men to esteem Christ, and build upon him. The vanity and folly of these builders’ opinion appears in this, that they are overpowered by the great Architect of the church: his purpose stands. Notwithstanding their rejection of Christ, he is still made the head corner stone. They cast him away by their reproaches, and by giving him up to be crucified and then cast into the grave, causing a stone to be rolled upon this stone which they had so rejected, that it might appear no more, and so thought themselves sure. But even from thence did he arise, and became the head of the corner. Robert Leighton.

Verse 22. The stone which the builders refused, etc. That is to say, God sent a living, precious, chosen stone on earth; but the Jews, who then had the building of the church, rejected that stone, and said of it, “This man, who observeth not the Sabbath, is not of God and, “We have no king but Caesar,” and, That seducer said, I will rise after three days”; and many similar things beside. But this stone, so rejected by the builders as unfit for raising the spiritual edifice, is become the head of the corner; has been made by God, the principal architect, the bond to connect the two walls and keep them together; that is to say, has been made the head of the whole church, composed of Jews and Gentiles; and such a head, that whoever is not under him cannot be saved; and whoever is built under him, the living stone, will certainly be saved. Now all this is the Lord’s doing, done by his election and design, without any intervention on the part of man, and therefore, it is wonderful in our eyes. For who is there that must not look upon it as a wonderful thing, to find a man crucified, dead and buried, rising, after three days, from the dead, immortal, with unbounded power, and declared Prince of men and angels, and a way opened through him for mortal man, to the kingdom of heaven, to the society of the angels, to a happy immortality? Robert Bellarmine.

Verse 22. The stone which the builders refused. Here we behold with how strong and impregnable a shield the Holy Ghost furnishes us against the empty vaunting of the Papal clergy. Be it so, that they possess the name, “chief builders”; but if they disown Christ, does it necessarily follow that we must disown him also? Let us rather contemn and trample under our feet all their decrees, and let us reverence this precious stone upon which our salvation rests. By the expression, is become the head of the corner, we are to understand the real foundation of the church, which sustains the whole weight of the edifice; it being requisite that the corners should form the main strength of buildings. John Calvin.

Verse 22. The stone, etc. That is, I, whom the great men and rulers of the people rejected ( 1 Samuel 26:19 ), as the builders of a house reject a stone unfit to be employed in it, am now become king over Israel and Judah; and a type of that glorious King who shall hereafter be in like manner refused ( Luke 19:14 Luke 20:17 ), and then be by God exalted to be Lord of all the world, and the foundation of all men’s happiness. Thomas Fellton.

Verse 22 The stone. The author of Historia Scholastica mentions it as a tradition that at the building of the second temple there was a particular stone of which that was literally true, which is here parabolically rehearsed, viz., that it had the hap to be often taken up by the builders, and as oft rejected, and at last was found to be perfectly fit for the most honourable place, that of the chief cornerstone, which coupled the sides of the walls together, the extraordinariness whereof occasioned the speech here following: This is the Lord’s doing; it is marvellous in our eyes. Henry Hammond.

Verse 22. The head stone of the corner. How of the “corner”? The corner is the place where two walls meet: and there be many twos in this building: the two walls of nations. Jews and Gentiles; the two of conditions, bond and free; the two of sex, male and female: the great two (which this Easter day we celebrate) of the quick and the dead; above all, the greatest two of all, heaven and earth. Lancelot Andrewes.

Verse 22. Is become the head stone of the corner.

Higher yet and ever higher, passeth he those ranks above, Where the seraphs are enkindled with the flame of endless love; Passeth them, for not even seraphs ever loved so well as he Who hath borne for his beloved, stripes, and thorns, and shameful tree; Ever further, ever onward, where no angel’s foot may tread, Where the twenty-four elders prostrate fall in mystic dread: Where the four strange living creatures sing their hymn before the throne, The Despised One and rejected passeth, in his might alone; Passeth through the dazzling rainbow, till upon the father’s right He is seated, his Co-Equal, God of God, anti Light of Light. R. F. Littledale.

Verse 22. Head stone of the corner. It is now clear to all by divine grace whom Holy Scripture calls the cornerstone. Him in truth who, taking unto himself from one side the Jewish, and from the other the Gentile people, unites, as it were, two walls in the one fabric of the Church; them of whom it is written, “He hath made both one”; who exhibited himself as the Cornerstone, not only in things below, but in things above, because he united on earth the nations of the Gentiles to the people of Israel, and both together to angels. For at his birth the angels exclaimed, “On earth peace, good will toward men.” Gregory, quoted by Henry Newland, 1860.

Verse 22. The corner. By Bede it is rendered as a reason why the Jewish builders refused our Saviour Christ for the head place, Quia in uno pariete, stare amabant. They could endure no corner; they must stand alone upon their own single wall; be of themselves, not join with Gentiles or Samaritans. And Christ they endured not, because they thought if he had been heard he would have inclined that way. Alias oves oportet me adducere ( John 10:16 ). Alias they could not abide. But sure, a purpose there must be, alias oves adducendi, of bringing in others, of joining a corner, or else we do not facere secundum exemplar, build not according to Christ’s pattern; our fashion of fabric is not like his. Lancelot Andrewes.

Verse 22-27. By the consent of all expositors, in this Psalm is typed the coming of Christ, and his kingdom of the gospel. This is manifested by an exaltation, by an exultation, by a petition, by a benediction. The exaltation: Psalms 118:22 , The stone which the builders refused is become the head stone of the corner. The Jews refused this stone, but God hath built his church upon it.

The exultation: Psalms 118:24 , This is the day which the Lord hath made; we will rejoice and be glad in it. A more blessed day than that day was wherein he made man, when he had done making the world; “Rejoice we, and be glad in it.”

The petition: Psalms 118:25 , Save now, I beseech thee, O LORD: O LORD, I beseech thee, send now prosperity. Thy justice would not suffer thee to save without the Messiah; he is come, “Save now, O LORD, I beseech thee.” Our Saviour is come, let mercy and salvation come along with him.

The benediction makes all clear: Psalms 118:26 , Blessed be he that cometh in the name of the LORD. For what David here prophesied, the people after accomplished: Matthew 21:9 , “Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord.” The corollary or sum is in my text: Psalms 118:27 , God is the LORD, which hath shewed us light: bind the sacrifice with cords, even unto the horns of the altar. Thomas Adams.

HINTS FOR PASTORS AND LAYPERSONS

Verse 22. In these words we may notice the following particulars.

1. The metaphorical view in which the church is here represented, namely, that of a house or building. 2. The character that our Immanuel bears with respect to this building; he is the stone in a way of eminence, without whom there can be no building, no house for God to dwell in among the children of men. 3. The character of the workmen employed in this spiritual structure; they are called builders. 4. A fatal error they are charged with in building the house of God; they refuse the stone of God’s choosing; they do not allow him a place in his own house. 5. Notice the place that Christ should and shall have in this building, let the builders do their worst: he is made the head stone of the corner. The words immediately following declare how this is effected, and how the saints are affected with the news of his exaltation, notwithstanding the malice of hell and earth: “This is the Lord’s doing, and it is wonderful in our eyes.” Ebenezer Erskine.

Verse 22-23.

1. The mystery stated. a. That which is least esteemed by men as a means of salvation is most esteemed by God. b. That which is most esteemed by God when made known is least esteemed by man. 2. The mystery explained. The way of salvation is the Lord’s doing, therefore marvellous in our eyes. –G.R.

Verse 22-25. —

1. Christ rejected. 2. Christ exalted. 3. His exaltation is due to God alone. 4. His exaltation commences a new era. 5. His exaltation suggests a new prayer. See Spurgeon’s Sermon, no. 1,420.

 Psalm 118:21 Psalm 118:23 

Read Psalm 118:22

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