ORION AKA NIMROD AKA…ETC

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ORION BIRTHS PLANETS, THE SUN, THE MOON & THE SOLAR SYSTEM

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FROM GENESIS FIG LEAVES TO THE DESCENDING INTO CLOTHES/GARMENTS OF ANIMALS/MEAT

ISAIAH 4:1

LUKE 2:

SWADDLING CLOTHES/GARMENT/BLANKET?

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Biblical Data: Son of Cush and grandson of Ham; his name has become proverbial as that of a mighty hunter. His “kingdom” comprised Babel, Erech, Accad, and Calneh, in the land of Sinar, otherwise known as the land of Nimrod (Gen. x. 8-10; I Chron. i. 10; Micah v. 5 [A. V. 6]). —In Rabbinical Literature: Nimrod is the prototype of a rebellious people, his name being interpreted as “he who made all the people rebellious against God” (Pes. 94b; comp. Targ. of pseudo-Jonathan and Targ. Yer. to Gen. x. 9). He is identified with Cush and with Amraphel, the name of the latter being interpreted as “he whose words are dark” (

other explanations see below). As he was the first hunter he was consequently the first who introduced the eating of meat by man. He was also the first to make war on other peoples (Midr. Agadah to Gen. x. 9). His Feats as a Hunter. Nimrod was not wicked in his outh. On the contrary, when a young man he used to sacrifice to Yhwh the animals which he caught while hunting (“Sefer ha-Yashar,” section “Noa ,” pp. 9a et seq., Leghorn, 1870). His great success in hunting (comp. Gen. x. 9) was due to the fact that he wore the coats of skin which God made for Adam and Eve (Gen. iii. 21). These coats were handed down from father to son, and thus came into the possession of Noah, who took them with him into the ark, whence they were stolen by Ham. The latter gave them to his son Cush, who in turn gave them to Nimrod, and when the animals saw the latter clad in them, they crouched before him so that he had no difficulty in catching them. The people, however, thought that these feats were due to his extraordinary strength, so that they made him their king (Pir e R. El. xxiv.; “Sefer ha-Yashar,” l.c.; comp. Gen. R. lxv. 12). Made King. According to another account, when Nimrod was eighteen years old, war broke out between the Hamites, his kinsmen, and the Japhethites. The latter were at first victorious, but Nimrod, at the head of a small army of Cushites, attacked and defeated them, after which he was made king over all the people on earth, appointing Terah his minister. It was then, elated by so much glory, that Nimrod changed his behavior toward Yhwh and became the most flagrant idolater. When informed of Abraham’s birth he requested Terah to sell him the new-born child in order that he might kill it (see Jew. Encyc. i. 86a, s.v. Abraham in Rabbinical Literature). Terah hid Abraham and in his stead brought to Nimrod the child of a slave, which Nimrod dashed to pieces (“Sefer ha-Yashar,” l.c.). Nimrod is generally considered to have been the one who suggested building the Tower of Babel and who directed its construction. God said: “I made Nimrod great; but he built a tower in order that he might rebel against Me” ( ul. 89b). The tower is called by the Rabbis “the house of Nimrod,” and is considered as a house of idolatry which the owners abandoned in time of peace; consequently Jews may make use of it (‘Ab. Zarah 53b). After the builders of the tower were dispersed Nimrod remained in Shinar, where he reestablished his kingdom. According to the “Sefer ha-Yashar” (l.c.), he at this time acquired the name “Amraphel” in allusion to the fall of his princes (

the dispersion. According to the Targum of pseudo-Jonathan (to Gen. x. 11), however, Nimrod had left Babylonia before the building of the tower, and had gone to Assyria, where he built four other cities, namely, Nineveh, Rehobot, Calah, and Resen (comp. Na manides ad loc.). Nimrod’s Dream. The punishment visited on the builders of the tower did not cause Nimrod to change his conduct; he remained an idolater. He particularly persecuted Abraham, who by his command was thrown into a heated furnace; and it was on this account, according to one opinion, that Nimrod was called “Amraphel” (

pseudo-Jonathan to Gen. xiv. 1; Gen. R. xlii. 5; Cant. R. viii. 8). When Nimrod was informed that Abraham had come forth from the furnace uninjured, he remitted his persecution of the worshiper of Yhwh; but on the following night he saw in a dream a man coming out of the furnace and advancing toward him with a drawn sword. Nimrod thereupon ran away, but the man threw an egg at him; this was afterward transformed into a large river in which all his troops were drowned, only he himself and three of his followers escaping. Then the river again became an egg, and from the latter came forth a small fowl, which flew at Nimrod and pecked out his eye. The dream was interpreted as forecasting Nimrod’s defeat by Abraham, wherefore Nimrod sent secretly to kill Abraham; but the latter emigrated with his family to the land of Canaan. Ten years later Nimrod came to wage war with Chedorlaomer, King of Elam, who had been one of Nimrod’s generals, and who after the dispersion of the builders of the tower went to Elam and formed there an independent kingdom. Nimrod at the head of an army set out with the intention of punishing his rebellious general, but the latter routed him. Nimrod then became a vassal of Chedorlaomer, who involved him in the war with the kings of Sodom and Gomorrah, with whom he was defeated by Abraham (“Sefer ha-Yashar,” l.c.; comp. Gen. xiv. 1-17). Nimrod was slain by Esau, between whom and himself jealousy existed owing to the fact that they were both hunters (Targ. pseudo-Jonathan to Gen. xxv. 27; “Sefer ha-Yashar,” section “Toledot,” p. 40b; Pir e R. El. l.c.; comp. Gen. R. lxv. 12). —Critical View: Two prominent theories are now held in regard to Nimrod’s identity: one, adopted by G. Smith and Jeremias, is that Nimrod is to be identified with the Babylonian hero Izdubar or Gishdubar (Gilgamesh); the second, that of Sayce,Pinches, and others, identifies Nimrod with Marduk, the Babylonian Mercury. The former identification is based on the fact that Izdubar is represented in the Babylonian epos as a mighty hunter, always accompanied by four dogs, and as the founder of the first great kingdom in Asia. Moreover, instead of “Izdubar”—the correct reading of which had not yet been determined—Jeremias saw the possibility of reading “Namra Udu” (shining light), a reading which would have made the identification with Nimrod almost certain. Those who identify Nimrod with Marduk, however, object that the name of Izdubar must be read, as is now generally conceded, “Gilgamesh,” and that the signs which constitute the name of Marduk, who also is represented as a hunter, are read phonetically “Amar Ud”; and ideographically they may be read “Namr Ud”—in Hebrew “Nimrod.” The difficulty of reconciling the Biblical Nimrod, the son of Cush, with Marduk, the son of Ea, may be overcome by interpreting the Biblical words as meaning that Nimrod was a descendant of Cush. Two other theories may be mentioned: one is that Nimrod represents the constellation of Orion; the other is that Nimrod stands for a tribe, not an individual (comp. Lagarde, “Armenische Studien,” in “Abhandlungen der Göttinger Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften,” xxii. 77; Nöldeke, in “Z. D. M. G.” xxviii. 279). Bibliography: Cheyne and Black, Encyc. Bibl.; Joseph Grivel, in Transactions Soc. Bibl. Arch. iii. 136 et seq.; Sayce, ib. ii. 243 et seq.; Jeremias, Izdubar Nimrod, Introduction, Leipsic, 1891; Pinches, The Old Testament, pp. 127-131; Rubin, Birusi ha-Kasdi, pp. 71-72, Vienna, 1882.

—In Arabic Literature: By the Arabs Nimrod is considered as the supreme example of the tyrant (“al-jabbar”). There is some confusion among Arabian historians as to Nimrod’s genealogy. According to one authority he was the son of Mash the son of Aram, and consequently a Semite; he built the Tower of Babel and also a bridge over the Euphrates, and reigned five hundred years over the Nabatæans, his kinsmen. But the general opinion is that he was a Hamite, son of Canaan the son of Cush, or son of Cush the son of Canaan ( abari gives both); that he was born at the time of Reu, and was the first to establish fire-worship. Another legend is to the effect that there were two Nimrods: the first was the son of Cush; the second was the well-known tyrant and contemporary of Abraham; he was the son of Canaan and therefore a great-grandson of the first Nimrod. According to Mas’udi (“Muruj al-Dhahab,” ii. 96), Nimrod was the first Babylonian king, and during a reign of sixty years he dug many canals in ‘Ira . Nimrod and Abraham. The author of the “Ta’rikh Munta ab” (quoted by D’Herbelot in his “Bibliothèque Orientale”) identifies Nimrod with Da ak (the Persian Zo ak), the first Persian king after the Flood. But Al-Kharizmi (“Mafati al-‘Ulum,” quoted by D’Herbelot) identifies him with Kai Kaos, the second king of the second Persian dynasty. Nimrod reigned where Bagdad is now situated, and at first he reigned with justice (see Nimrod in Rabbinical Literature); but Satan perverted him, and then he began to persecute all the worshipers of God. His chief vizier was Azar (Terah), the father of Abraham; and the midrashic legends of Abraham’s birth in which Nimrod is mentioned, as well as those concerning Nimrod’s persecution of Abraham—whom he cast into a furnace—are narrated also by the Mohammedans (see Abraham in Apocryphal and Rabbinical Literature and in Mohammedan Legend). Nimrod is referred to in the Koran (xxi. 68-69). When Nimrod saw Abraham come unharmed from the furnace, he said to him: “Thou hast a powerful God; I wish to offer Him hospitality.” Abraham told him that his God needed nobody’s hospitality. Nevertheless Nimrod ordered thousands of horned and small cattle brought, and fowl and fish, and sacrificed them all to God; but God did not accept them. Humiliated, Nimrod shut himself in his palace and allowed no one to approach him. According to another tradition, Nimrod challenged Abraham, when the latter came out of the furnace, to fight with him. Nimrod gathered a considerable army and on the appointed day was surprised to find Abraham alone. Asked where his army was, Abraham pointed to a swarm of gnats, which routed Nimrod’s troops (see, however, below). Nimrod assembled his ministers and informed them of his intention to ascend into the heavens and strike down Abraham’s God. His ministers having told him that it would be difficult to accomplish such a journey, the heavens being very high, Nimrod conceived the idea of building a high tower, by means of which he might accomplish his purpose (comp. Sanh. 109a). After many years had been spent in the construction of the tower, Nimrod ascended to its top, but he was greatly surprised to find that the heavens were still as remote from him as when he was on the ground. He was still more mortified on the following day, when the tower collapsed with such a noise that the people fainted with terror, those that recovered losing their speech (an allusion to the confusion of tongues). Undaunted by this failure, Nimrod planned another way to reach the heavens. He had a large chest made with an opening in the top and another in the bottom. At the four corners of the chest stakes were fixed, with a piece of flesh on each point. Then four large vultures, or, according to another source, four eagles, previously fed upon flesh, were attached to the stakes below the meat. Accompanied by one of his most faithful viziers, Nimrod entered the chest, and the four great birds soared up in the air carrying the chest with them (comp. Alexander’s ascent into the air; Yer. ‘Ab. Zarah iii. 42c; Num. R. xiii. 13). The vizier opened alternately the upper and lower doors of the chest in order that by looking in both directions he might know whether or not he was approaching heaven. When they were so high up that they could see nothing in either direction Nimrod took his bow and shot arrows into the sky. Gabriel thereupon sent the arrows back stained with blood, so that Nimrod was convinced that he had avenged himself upon Abraham’s God. After wandering in the air for a certain length of time Nimrod descended, and the chest crashed upon the ground with such violencethat the mountains trembled and the angels thought an order from God had descended upon the earth. This event is alluded to in the Koran (xiv. 47): “The machinations and the contrivances of the impious cause the mountains to tremble.” Nimrod himself was not hurt by the fall. After these adventures Nimrod continued to reign wickedly. Four hundred years later an angel in the form of a man appeared to him and exhorted him to repent, but Nimrod declared that he himself was sole ruler and challenged God to fight with him. Nimrod asked for a delay of three days, during which he gathered a considerable army; but this was exterminated by swarms of gnats. One of these insects is said to have entered Nimrod’s nose, reached the chambers of his brain, and gnawed at it. To allay the pain Nimrod ordered some one to strike with a hammer upon an anvil, in order that the noise might cause the gnat to cease gnawing (comp. the same story in connection with Titus in Gi . 56b). Nimrod died after forty years’ suffering.

ANGELS & DEMONS (SCIENCE VS RELIGION..TELL THE TRUTH MR POPE)

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POPE=FISH=SEA GODS POSEIDON & ORION

Did you ever wonder why the Pope’s mitre looks like the head of a fish? What are the origins of this ceremonial hat and what does it truly represent?

Dagon, the fish-god of the Philistines and Babylonians, wore a fish hat that is still seen today with ‘s pope and bishops.

According to

,

The story the church wants you to believe is provided by a PDF entitled, “The Bishop’s Vestments” while an online version of this explanation can be found .

What the church’s explanation fails to describe is the actual fish eye on the side of the mitre. Perhaps this is an ember of charcoal from the tongues of fire?

Probably not, it’s a fish eye.

The book stated:

The stated:

Ea / Enki, who is a God of Sumerian (Enki) and Babylonian (Ea) mythology. In Babylonian mythology, Ea was a water god who was half man, half fish hybrid. In Greek mythology, Ea was known as Oannes.

By any name, this fish-god can be traced back to the genetic manipulation of man by , as evidenced by . It is believed that, in the daytime, this deity would emerge from the water and was responsible for teaching art, science and writing to the human race.

Berossus, a 3rd century Babylonian priest once wrote,

In the stated:

The Ring of the Fisherman, also known as the Piscatory Ring, is an official part of the regalia worn by the Pope, who is head of and successor of Saint Peter, who was a fisherman by trade. It used to feature a bas-relief of Peter fishing from a boat, a symbolism derived from the tradition that the apostles were “fishers of men” (Mark 1:17).

The Fisherman’s Ring is a signet used until 1842 to seal official documents signed by the Pope.

According to , In breaking with this tradition:

Although Pope Benedict XVI wore his Fisherman’s Ring daily, it is no longer the custom for popes to wear it at all. Generally, a new pope will either inherit the daily-wear ring of his predecessor, keep an old ring of his own preference, or will choose a new daily-wear style.

Why is it no longer custom for the pope to wear this ring? Because in astrotheology, we are existing out of the (the ) and into the .

The ring no longer symbolizes the Age of Pisces. Instead of seeing the two fish on people’s bumper stickers, we will soon start seeing some sort of sign for the water bearer, Aquarius.

;

In the bible, Dagon dates back to around the 3rd millennium, B.C., long before the birth of and was first mentioned in Judges 16:23, where the Philistines offered Dagon a great sacrifice after their idol allegedly delivered Samson to them.

This is just one of the many ritualistic sacrifices that we see in and is no different than any modern day sacrifice, such as or any given war.

Many consider the Canaanites to be part of the Philistines who worshipped worshiped Baal, Astarte and Dagon. These were some of the early sun-worshipping cultures that have led to many of the metaphors we see in modern religion, e.g. God’s son/sun.

In Mali, there is a , whose legends from their heritage were used by the Egyptians and subsequent dynasties. The Dogon knew of constellations and alignments that we didn’t ‘discover’ until many years later, such as Sirius B.

According to Dogon legend, the Nommos arrived from the in a vessel along with fire and thunder, or as we would say today, in a . The Nommos were part fish and part man and could live on both land and in the sea. They are also referred to as “Masters of the Water”, “the Monitors”, and “the Teachers”.

[Alexander: Personally, I concur to ‘s theory, stating that the Dogon “blazing star” was never Sirius, but the same old “star of the gods,” (depicted by all major ancient cultures across the world) which is invisible to the naked eye — hence the need of using Orion’s Belt and the Pleiades as benchmarks to find it.

This also justifies the ‘s logo, the square and the compass, which were used by the human-Anunnaki hybrids (generally known as “royals” or “elites”) to find the “star of the gods” in the night sky (notice the 33 degrees angle of the compass, which also stands for the 33 Masonic ranks — the higher in rank, the closer to the “star of the gods”):

For more information, please ].

Perhaps frogs, and whales were placed here by the Nommos? Even the mystery of mermaids may originate from this premise.

Throughout mythology, we see fish-like people, mermaids and mermen, such as Poseidon or Neptune. An excerpt from stated:

;

Why do we see fish fries on Friday? Did you ever wonder why practicing Catholics abstain from eating fish on all days except Friday?

It is not because of the phonetics of Fry-Day. The come s from Freya’s Day. Freya (Fria) is the Teutonic goddess of love, beauty, and fecundity (prolific procreation) and is identified with the Norse god, Freya.

The following is provided by the :

According to : An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church:

In the Revelation chapter of the bible it states the beast shall rise out of the sea:

Perhaps this is responsible for the term “Holy See” (Holy Sea)?

It is certainly no coincidence that the entire planet abides by , which is the law of the sea (Holy See).

As for the pope’s miter, it’s a fish hat and its origin is tied into mythology, ufology, paganism and sun worshiping.

By Gregg Prescott, M.S., ;

About author: Gregg Prescott, M.S. is the founder and editor of and . He hosts a weekly spiritual show on and promotes spiritual, metaphysical and esoteric conferences in the United States through . Gregg is currently working in collaboration with , in opening a holistic walk-in clinic called Alternative Holistic Healthcare (AHH) in Sarasota, FL with subsequent subsidiaries around the world based upon this model.

What is the origin of the Pope’s hat?

Roman Catholic Church

Ruben Joseph’s book entitled, Why Are The Young People Leaving The Church

here

A History-Long Worship of the Anunnaki

Nineveh and Babylon by Austen Henry Layard

Wine of Babylon

the Anunnaki Zecharia Sitchin’s work

book Revelation, H. A. Ironside

Did you ever wonder why people kiss the Pope’s ring? Why do so many people of prominence kiss the Pope’s ring?

the Catholic Church

wiki

Age of Pisces two fish Age of Aquarius

Related: The Darkest Secrets of the Vatican

Who is Dagon?

Jesus Christ

the bible

9/11

tribe called the Dogons

Sirius star system

UFO

Wayne Herschel

Freemasonry

visit Wayne Herschel’s website

dolphins

Ancient Pagan and Modern Christian Symbolism

Related: The Vatican City And Rome: Esoteric Beyond Belief

Why do we eat fish on Friday?

origin of Friday

History of Origin of Fish Symbol

The Catholic Encyclopedia

More fish food for thought

Maritime Admiralty Law

in5d

In5D BodyMindSoulSpirit In5D Radio

In5dEvents

Michelle Walling, CHLC

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