SOUTH CAROLINA SEALS & SYMBOLS

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SOUTH CAROLINA BAHA’I RELIGION

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Pine Tree Blazed in 1735 to Mark the North Carolina/South Carolina Boundary

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REMEMBER THE VATICAN “PINECONE” COURT (symbol for the 3rd EYE, PINEal Gland?)

A commission resurveying the North Carolina/South Carolina boundary in 1928 found a long leaf pine that had been blazed to mark the boundary in 1735. They felled the tree, replaced it with a stone marker, and gave one half of the blazed section of the tree to each state. The State Archives holds many maps and plats serving as legal records of boundaries of various kinds, but this tree section is unique and one of the most unusual records in the holdings.

SITE FOR MORE PALMETTO PALM STATE SOUTH CAROLINA & SYMBOLS

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The phrase also appears on the Seal of South Carolina.

Quis separabit? (Latin: Who will separate [us]?) is a motto associated with Ireland. For example, it is used in the British Army by the Royal Dragoon Guards, [1] the Royal Ulster Rifles, the London Irish Rifles, the Irish Guards, [2] and the North Irish Horse, and it is also the motto of the Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick. The phrase also appears on the Seal of South Carolina.

It was the motto of the 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards, [3] a cavalry regiment of the British Army from 1922 to 1992. It was also the motto of the Connaught Rangers, an Irish regiment of the British Army, from its amalgamation in 1881 until it was disbanded in 1922. Prior to this, it was the motto of the precursor regiment of the Rangers, the 88th Regiment of Foot (Connaught Rangers) which was founded in 1793. It was also the motto of the Ulster Defence Regiment. It was also the motto of the 5th Royal Irish Lancers.

It was the motto of the former Government of Northern Ireland and appeared on the province’s defunct coat of arms. It is also the motto of the Ulster Defence Association, a proscribed loyalist paramilitary group in Northern Ireland. [4] The source is the Vulgate translation of Romans, 8:35: “Quis nos separabit a caritate Christi…”, translated as “Who shall separate us from the love of Christ?”, the motto of Cardinal Pietro Parolin.

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The Great Seal of the State of South Carolina was adopted in 1776. The seal is made up of two elliptical areas, linked by branches of the palmetto tree. The image on the left is dominated by a tall palmetto tree and an oak tree, fallen and broken. This scene represents the battle fought on June 28, 1776, between defenders of the unfinished fort on Sullivan’s Island, and the British Fleet. The standing palmetto represents the victorious defenders, and the fallen oak is the British Fleet. Banded together on the palmetto with the motto “Quis separabit?” (“Who Will Separate [Us]?”), are 12 spears that represent the first 12 states of the Union. Surrounding the image, at the top, is “South Carolina”, and below, is “Animis Opibusque Parati” (“Prepared in Mind and Resources”). The other image on the seal depicts the Roman Goddess Spes walking along a shore that is littered with weapons. The Goddess, symbolizing Hope, grasps a branch of laurel as the sun rises behind her. Below her image is her name “Spes”, Latin for “Hope”, and over the image is the motto “Dum Spiro Spero”, or “While I Breathe I Hope”.

The Great Seal of South Carolina was “set” or “affixed” to the Ordinance of Secession of December 20, 1860, at Secession Hall in Charleston shortly after 7:00 p.m., following which convention delegates signed it, including Robert Barnwell Rhett, as some three thousand South Carolinians watched enthusiastically the proclamation of South Carolina as “a separate, independent nationality.”

Aliearia

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