NOSTRADAMUS, LUSITANIA & ROOM 40

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NOSTRADAMUS QUATRAIN C9 Q60

NOSTRADAMUS QUATRAIN C9 Q60

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NOSTRADAMUS PROPHECIES SITE

May 7, 1915: A torpedo from a German U-boat sinks the Lusitania off the coast of Ireland, killing nearly 1,200 people

When the Lusitania went down, three years after the sinking of the Titanic, the similarities were hard to overlook. Both British ocean liners had been the largest ships in the world when first launched (the Lusitania at 787 feet in 1906, and the Titanic at 883 feet in 1911). And both were ostentatiously luxurious, designed to ferry the world’s wealthiest passengers between Europe and the United States in comfort and elegance.

The difference, of course, was what sunk them: an iceberg for the Titanic on her maiden voyage in 1912, and a German torpedo for the Lusitania on this day, May 7, 100 years ago.

TAP TO READ FULL STORY ▼

Print Collector / Getty Images An illustration of the ocean liner RMS ‘Lusitania’

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REMEMBERING THE CHILDREN WHO PERISHED IN THE SINKING SHIP LUSIATANIA

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VIOLA MARTINSSON MADE OF

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VOLVO COMMERCIAL SONG MADE OF BY VIOLA MARTINSSON

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MY TWIN FLAME/SOULMATE, COMMERCIAL DESIGNED WITH TANYA (Tania) AS THE MESSEGE OF COMPLETION THROUGH THE QUATRAIN # matching the volvo cars #)

VOLVO: C90 (same as Nostradamus quatrain with my name used as being the one who brings aid, Tanya/TANIA=FAIRIER=FAIRY

QUATRAIN C9 Q60

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NOSTRADAMUS PROPHECY: LUSIATANIA

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S90 VOLVO COMMERCIAL: The Open Road

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NOSTRADAMUS PROPHECIES COMING TO PASS (Pope quits & last USA President )

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RMS Lusitania was a British ocean liner that was sunk by a German submarine in World War I, causing a major diplomatic uproar. The ship was a holder of the Blue Riband, and briefly the world’s largest passenger ship until the completion of her running mate Mauretania. She was launched by the Cunard Line in 1906, at a time of fierce competition for the North Atlantic trade. She made a total of 202 trans-Atlantic crossings. [3]

German shipping lines were aggressive competitors in the transatlantic trade, and Cunard responded by trying to outdo them in speed, capacity and luxury. Lusitania and Mauretania were fitted with revolutionary new turbine engines, able to maintain a service speed of 25 knots (46 km/h; 29 mph). Equipped with lifts, wireless telegraph and electric light, they provided 50% more passenger space than any other ship, and the first class decks were noted for their sumptuous furnishings.

When RMS Lusitania left New York for Britain on 1 May 1915, German submarine warfare was intensifying in the Atlantic. Germany had declared the seas around the United Kingdom a war zone, and the German embassy in the United States had placed a newspaper advertisement warning people of the dangers of sailing on Lusitania. On the afternoon of 7 May, Lusitania was torpedoed by a German U-Boat, 11 mi (18 km) off the southern coast of Ireland and inside the declared “zone of war”. A second, unexplained, internal explosion sent her to the bottom in 18 minutes, causing the deaths of 1,198 passengers and crew.

In firing on what was officially a non-military ship without warning, the Germans were accused of breaching international laws known as the Cruiser Rules. However it was not possible for submarines to give warning due to the British introduction of Q-ships with concealed deck guns. German justifications for treating Lusitania as a naval vessel centered on the fact that the ship was carrying hundreds of tons of war munitions, therefore making it a legitimate military target, and also that British merchant ships had violated the Cruiser Rules from the very beginning of the war. [4][5][6][7][8] The ship had been fitted with 6-inch gun mounts in 1913. The sinking caused a storm of protest in the United States, however, as 128 American citizens were among the dead. The sinking helped shift public opinion in the United States against Germany, and was a factor in the United States’ declaration of war nearly two years later.

Successive British governments since World War I have maintained there were no munitions on board the Lusitania and the Germans were not justified in treating the ship as a naval vessel. However, in 1982, the head of the British Foreign Office’s North America department admitted that there is a large amount of ammunition in the wreck, some of which is highly dangerous and which poses a safety risk to salvage teams. [9]

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