Monthly Archives: April 2017

GENERAL MARK MILLEY

Birth name Mark Alexander Milley
Born June 20, 1958 (age 58)
Winchester, Massachusetts, U.S.
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch  United States Army
Years of service 1980–present
Rank General
Commands held U.S. Army Chief of Staff
United States Army Forces Command
III Corps
International Security Assistance Force Joint Command
10th Mountain Division
2nd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (Light)
Battles/wars United States invasion of Panama
Operation Uphold Democracy
Operation Joint Endeavor
Iraq War
 • Operation Iraqi Freedom
Operation Enduring Freedom
 • War in Afghanistan
Awards Defense Distinguished Service Medal
Army Distinguished Service Medal (3)
Defense Superior Service Medal (3)
Legion of Merit (3)
Bronze Star Medal (4)
Meritorious Service Medal (6)
Website www.army.mil/leaders/csa

Mark Alexander Milley (born June 20, 1958) is a United States Army officer. A four-star general, he is the 39th Chief of Staff of the Army.[1] He previously served as the 21st commanding general of U.S. Army Forces Command from August 15, 2014 to August 9, 2015.[2]

Early life and educationEdit

Born in Winchester, Massachusetts, Milley attended the Belmont Hill School.[3] He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science from Princeton University, a Master of Arts degree in international relations from Columbia University, and another Master of Arts degree in national security and security studies from the U.S. Naval War College.[4] He is also a graduate of the MIT Center for International Studies Seminar XXI National Security Studies Program.[5]

CareerEdit

Milley earned his commission as an Armor officer through Princeton’s Army ROTC program in 1980 and spent most of his career in Infantry or Special Forces assignments.[6] He is only the second CSA to have graduated from an Ivy League school, the first one having been Leonard Wood, who graduated with his AB from Harvard University and his MD from Harvard Medical School.

Prior to serving as the 39th U.S. Army Chief of Staff, he served as the Commanding General of U.S. Forces Command, based at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He served as the Commanding General of III Corps, based at Fort Hood, Texas.[7] Prior to III Corps, he served as the Commander of the 10th Mountain Division from November 2011 to December 2012.[8] He has also served as Deputy Commanding General (Operations), 101st Airborne Division from July 2007 to April 2008 and; Commander, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (Light) from December 2003 to July 2005. Additionally, Milley has served in the 82nd Airborne Division, the 5th Special Forces Group, the 7th Infantry Division, the 2nd Infantry Division, the Joint Readiness Training Center, the 25th Infantry Division, Operations Staff of the Joint Staff, and as a Military Assistant to the Secretary of Defense in the Pentagon.[9] He assumed his current assignment on August 14, 2015.[10]

In November 2000, Milley participated in the 2nd Annual Army-Navy Ice Hockey Game in Honolulu, Hawaii, a charity event benefiting youth ice hockey players in the area.[11]

Operational deploymentsEdit

Milley has had multiple operational deployments including:

Awards and decorationsEdit

CIB2.pngCombat Infantryman Badge with Star (denoting 2nd award)
Expert Infantry Badge.svgExpert Infantryman Badge
SpecialForcesTabMetal.jpgSpecial Forces Tab
Ranger Tab.svgRanger tab
Master Parachutist badge (United States).svgMaster Parachutist Badge
SFDiver.PNGSpecial Operations Diver Badge
Joint Chiefs of Staff seal.svgJoint Chiefs of Staff Identification Badge
United States Army Staff Identification Badge.pngArmy Staff Identification Badge
Brevet Parachutiste.jpgFrench Parachutist Badge
101st Airborne Division CSIB.png101st Airborne Division Combat Service Identification Badge
Distinctive unit insignia of the 506th Infantry Regiment (United States).svg506th Infantry Regiment Distinctive Unit Insignia
ASU overseas service bar.jpgOverseas Service Bars
Defense Distinguished Service Medal
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svgBronze oakleaf-3d.svg Army Distinguished Service Medal with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svgBronze oakleaf-3d.svg Defense Superior Service Medal with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svgBronze oakleaf-3d.svg Legion of Merit with two oak leaf clusters
Width-44 scarlet ribbon with width-4 ultramarine blue stripe at center, surrounded by width-1 white stripes. Width-1 white stripes are at the edges.Bronze oakleaf-3d.svgBronze oakleaf-3d.svgBronze oakleaf-3d.svg Bronze Star Medal with three oak leaf clusters

Silver oak leaf cluster

 Meritorious Service Medal with silver oak leaf cluster

Bronze oakleaf-3d.svgBronze oakleaf-3d.svgBronze oakleaf-3d.svgBronze oakleaf-3d.svg Army Commendation Medal with four oak leaf clusters

Bronze oak leaf cluster

 Army Achievement Medal with oak leaf cluster

Bronze oak leaf cluster

 Joint Meritorious Unit Award with oak leaf cluster

Bronze oakleaf-3d.svgBronze oakleaf-3d.svgBronze oakleaf-3d.svg Meritorious Unit Commendation with three oak leaf clusters

Bronze star

 National Defense Service Medal with one bronze service star

Bronze-service-star-3d.pngBronze-service-star-3d.png Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal with two service stars
Bronze-service-star-3d.pngBronze-service-star-3d.pngBronze-service-star-3d.png Afghanistan Campaign Medal with three campaign stars
Bronze-service-star-3d.pngBronze-service-star-3d.png Iraq Campaign Medal with two campaign stars
Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
Korea Defense Service Medal
Humanitarian Service Medal
Army Service Ribbon
Award numeral 5.png Army Overseas Service Ribbon with bronze award numeral 5

Bronze star

 NATO Medal for service with ISAF with bronze service star

Multinational Force and Observers Medal

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gal Perl Finkel, President-elect Trump – the ‘West Wing’ lessonThe Jerusalem Post, November 15, 2016.
  2. ^ https://www.army.mil/leaders/csa/?from=wiki
  3. ^ Berkowitz, Bram (August 27, 2015). “Winchester Native Mark A. Milley Becomes U.S. Army Chief of Staff”Winchester Star. Winchester, MA.
  4. ^http://www.forscom.army.mil/cmd_staff/gen_milley/gen_milley.htm
  5. ^ Art, Robert (September 1, 2015). “From the Director: September, 2015”MIT Seminar XXI. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  6. ^ Graham-Ashley, Heather (20 December 2012). “III Corps’ new commander views road ahead, training, support”. III Corps and Fort Hood Public Affairs. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  7. ^ Michelle Tan, Staff writer (13 May 2015). “Gen. Mark Milley picked for Army chief of staff”Army Times.
  8. ^ Block, Gordon (4 December 2012). “Fort Drum welcomes new 10th Mountain Division commander at ceremony”. Watertown Daily Times. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  9. ^ U.S. Army Forces Command, Commanding General, http://www.army.mil/forscom, dated 15 August 2014, last accessed 15 August 2015
  10. ^ Michelle Tan, Staff writer (14 August 2015). “Milley takes over as new chief of staff; Odierno retires”Army Times.
  11. ^ Army-Navy duel on ice
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ALIEARIA’S TIME NO LONGER SITE

ALIEARIA’S SPIRITUAL GIFTS TEST

Your Top Three Spiritual Gifts

(1) Exhorter
The God-given ability to draw near to individuals in time of need, encouraging and counseling them accurately with the Word of God, and persuading them to take courage in the face of something they must do or assuring them to take comfort because of something that has occurred (E.g. Barnabas in Acts 4:36-37, 9:26-27, 11:19-26, and 15:36-41). 

Characteristics of an Exhorter 
1. Verbally encouraging 
2. Likes to apply the Word rather than investigate it 
3. Prefers practical application over theological truth 
4. Works best with others 
5. Verbally encourages others to excel in ministry 
6. Loves to do personal counseling 
7. Excels in communication 
8. Perceives trials as opportunities for personal growth 
9. Has a positive attitude 
10. Easily makes decisions 

Challenges for an Exhorter 
1. Frequently interrupts others 
2. Uses Scripture out of context 
3. Out spoken and opinionated 
4. Slightly overconfident 

(2) Prophet
The God-given ability to communicate the message of God in relation to the truth already revealed (Jude 3). It is not necessarily or even primarily a prediction. Rather, it is done for the purposes of encouraging, strengthening and comforting (1 Cor. 14:3). These have the ability to perceive the spiritual needs of others and meet those needs through Scripture. 

Characteristics of a Prophet 
1. Able to recognize good and bad and hates what is bad 
2. Sees clearly not dimly; no foggy or indefinite areas 
3. Recognizes character in people, whether good or bad 
4. Encourages repentance for the glory of God 
5. Sees the Bible as the foundation for truth 
6. Courageously holds to spiritual truths 
7. Powerful and persuasive speaker 
8. Distraught over the sins of others 
9. Sees their own shortcomings and those of others 

Challenges for a Prophet 
1. May be judgmental and upfront 
2. Delights in goal accomplishment not forward progress 
3. Forcefully pushes others toward spiritual growth 
4. Intolerant of other views 
5. Struggles with self image 

(3) Teacher
The God-given ability to study, research, explain and communicate truth (e.g. Paul and Timothy in 2 Timothy 2:2). 

Characteristics of a Teacher 
1. Logical presenter of truth 
2. Confirms truth by examining facts 
3. Enjoys study and investigation 
4. Uses biblical illustrations 
5. Detests Scripture used out of context 
6. Establishes truth biblically 
7. Objective rather than subjective 
8. Accurate presenter of truth 
9. Tests the information of others 
10. Intellectual, disciplined, emotionally stable 

Challenges for a Teacher 
1. Can neglect application in exchange for information 
2. Slow to accept views of other 
3. Prideful due to knowledge 
4. May be legalistic and dogmatic 
5. Easily distracted by love of new interests 

Your Spiritual Gift Scores

Exhorter27 
Prophet26 
Teacher24 
Giver24 
Mercy22 
Server21 
Leader21

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THE SHINING ONES RETURN

so as to illuminate his divine soul with the light of the Torah and its commandments,

ואחר כך יאיר עליה אור האהבה

whereupon the light of love will also shine upon it,

כי ואהבת בגימטריא ב׳ פעמים אור, כידוע ליודעי ח״ן

(6for the word ve‘ahavta, (“And you shall love [the L‑rd your G‑d]”) has a numerical value twice that of or (“light”), as is known to those who are familiar with the Esoteric Discipline [of the Kabbalah]).

Thus, first must come the illumination earned by the fulfillment of Torah and mitzvot; only then can one be granted the illumination of experiencing a love of G‑d.

PALERMO STONE

The Palermo Stone, the fragment of the Egyptian Royal Annals housed in Palermo, Italy.

The Palermo Stone is one of seven surviving fragments of a stele known as the Royal Annals of the Old Kingdom of Ancient Egypt. The stele contained a list of the kings of Egypt from the First Dynasty (~3150–2890 BCE) through to the early part of the Fifth Dynasty (approx 2392–2283 BCE) and noted significant events in each year of their reigns. It was probably made during the Fifth dynasty.[1] The Palermo Stone is held in the Regional Archeological Museum Antonio Salinas in the city of PalermoItaly, from which it derives its name.

The term “Palermo Stone” is sometimes applied to all seven surviving fragments of the Royal Annals, including those held in museums in Cairo and London. The fragments are also sometimes described collectively as the “Cairo Annals Stone”,[2] although the term “Cairo Stone” is also used to mean only those fragments of the Royal Annals now in Cairo.

The Palermo Stone and other fragments of the Royal Annals preserve what is probably the oldest historical text that has survived from Ancient Egypt and form a key source for Egyptian history in the Old Kingdom.[3]

DescriptionEdit

The Royal Annals stele, of which the Palermo Stone formed part, may originally have been about 60 cm high and 2.1m wide. The fragments are composed of a compact hard black stone, probably a form of basalt.

The Palermo Stone itself is an irregular shield-shaped fragment, 43.5 cm high, 25 cm wide and 6.5 cm thick (maximum dimensions).

The inscription on the “front” (recto) of the Palermo Stone consists of 6 horizontal bands or registers of hieroglyphic text running right to left. The first register lists the names of predynastic kings of Lower Egypt (identified as such by the wearing of the Red Crown). The second and subsequent registers contain portions of royal annals for pharaohs of the First to Fourth Dynasties, that is lists of the key events in each year of the reign of each king, arranged chronologically. The second register on the Palermo Stone begins with the final year entries for a king of the First Dynasty whose name is not preserved, but who is generally assumed to be either Narmer or Aha.[4]The rest of the second register is taken up with the first nine annual entries for this king’s successor, who is again not named on the fragment, but is assumed to be either Aha or his successor Djer. The remainder of the inscription on this side continues with royal annals down to the kings of the Fourth Dynasty.

The text continues on the “back” (verso) of the Palermo Stone, cataloguing events during the reigns of pharaohs down to Neferirkare Kakai, third ruler of the Fifth Dynasty.[5] From the surviving fragments it is unclear whether the Royal Annals originally continued beyond this point in time. Where a king is named, the name of his mother is also recorded, such as Betrest mother of the First Dynasty king Semerkhet and Meresankh I mother of the Fourth Dynasty king Seneferu.

Information recorded in the Royal Annals (as preserved on the Palermo Stone) includes measurements of the height of the annual Nile flood (see Nilometer), the Inundation, details of festivals (such as Sed festivals), taxation, sculpture, buildings, and warfare.[6]

Archaeological historyEdit

The original location of the stele is unknown and none of the surviving fragments have a secure archeological provenance. One fragment now in Cairo is said to have been found at an archaeological site at Memphis, while three other fragments now in Cairo were said to have been found in Middle Egypt. No find site for the Palermo Stone itself has been suggested.

The Royal Annals of Egypt, showing a suggested reconstruction of the stele and the positions of the seven surviving fragments. P is the Palermo Stone, nos. 1-5 are the Cairo fragments, and L is the London fragment

The Palermo Stone was purchased by a Sicilian lawyer, Ferdinand Guidano, in 1859 and it has been in Palermo since 1866. On 19 October 1877, it was presented to the Palermo Archaeological Museum by the Guidano family, where it has remained since.

There are five fragments of the Royal Annals in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, four of which were acquired between 1895 and 1914. The fifth was purchased on the antiquities market in 1963. One small fragment is in the Petrie Museum of University College London, forming part of the collection of the archeologist Sir Flinders Petrie (and purchased by him in 1914).

A fragment of the Royal Annals, on display at the Petrie Museum, London, which is inscribed with part of the Khasekhemwy register and at the bottom with a sign from the Sneferu register

The importance of the Palermo Stone was not recognized until it was noticed by a visiting French archaeologist in 1895. The first full publication and translation was that done in 1902 by Heinrich Schäfer.

ControversiesEdit

There are controversies regarding the date of the Palermo Stone and of the Royal Annals it records. Arguments have raged as to whether the inscription was done in one go or was added to over time and as to whether it dates from the period it describes (i.e. from no later than the Fifth Dynasty). It has been argued that the stele was made much later, perhaps in the Twenty-Fifth Dynasty (747-656 BCE). It seems clear from the content of the inscription that, even if the Royal Annals, as preserved by the Palermo Stone and other fragments, were not carved at or soon after the period they describe, they are directly based on an Old Kingdom original.[7]

There are also controversies as to whether all the surviving fragments are part of the same stele or come from different copies. It has been suggested in this connection that not all of the fragments held in Cairo (none of which have any clear provenance) are genuine.[8]

The text is difficult to decipher due both to the state of preservation of the inscription (which varies widely) and due to its antiquity. If the text is a later copy, rather than a Fifth Dynasty original, there is also the possibility that errors crept in during the copying process.

SignificanceEdit

The Palermo Stone and the other associated fragments of the Royal Annals are a vital source for the history of the Old Kingdom and, for example, preserve names of members of the royal families during the first five dynasties which are not otherwise recorded.

New Kingdom Egyptian king lists, such as the Turin Canon (13th century BCE) and the Abydos king list (reign of Seti I, 1294–1279 BCE), identify Menes (probably Narmer) (c. 3100 or 3000 BCE) as the first king of the first dynasty and so credit him with unifying Egypt. However, the top register of the Royal Annals names some predynastic rulers of Upper and Lower Egypt, presumably referring to a time before Egypt was unified. Identification of these kings with historical persons remains controversial.

The ancient historian Manetho may have used information similar to the complete Royal Annals stele to construct his chronology of the early dynasties of Egypt, forming part of his Aegyptiaca (History of Egypt), written during the third century BCE, although the surviving king list most closely related to his work (as preserved by later ancient and later writers) is the Turin Canon

4/25/2017 MITZVAH CONCERNING CATTLE

ositive Commandment 78

The Tithe of the Herd

“And all the tithe of the cattle and livestock, the tenth shall be holy to G‑d”—Leviticus 27:32.

We are commanded to separate a tenth of the kosher cattle and livestock born to us each year. Their blood and fats are sprinkled and offered on the altar, and the rest of the flesh is consumed in Jerusalem by the animals’ owners.

According to biblical law, this mitzvah applies both in the land of Israel and outside of it, whether the Temple is standing or not [i.e., we are commanded to separate and sanctify the animals even though we cannot sacrifice them]. The Rabbis, however, instituted that we not perform this mitzvah when the Temple is not standing in Jerusalem—for fear lest someone consume the sanctified animal (before it becomes blemished and technically unfit for sacrifice).

When the Temple will be rebuilt, however, this mitzvah will be practiced in all locations.

Rambam – Sefer HaMitzvos
As Divided for The Daily Learning Schedule


Positive Mitzvah 78

   Day 184 Day 186   


Positive Mitzvah 78: Sanctifying one-tenth of a Herd
Leviticus 27:32 “And concerning the tithe (one-tenth) of the herd, or of the flock…the tenth shall be holy to the L-rd”“I plowed and planted and, now, I’ll reap my harvest!” says the farmer.

“I designed and built and worked hard. Now, I’ll earn my wages!” smiles the architect.

“I calculated and saved up, I invested my money and, now, I’ll make my profit!” beams the broker.

“Wait a minute!” declares the Torah, “don’t forget that it is HaShem who brings you success. You must show HaShem your appreciation!”

A Jew is commanded to set aside one tenth of his herds and flocks and offer them as sacrifices to HaShem who blesses his possessions.


Man, on his own, cannot reach higher than his own ego. He cannot break out of his own skin, he cannot lift himself up by pulling at his own hair. All of his achievements are tied to his own ego. All that he may comprehend is defined by his own subjective perception. He is a prisoner by virtue of existence. So G-d threw Man a rope. He gave him tasks to fulfill that are beyond his comprehension, thoughts to fathom that take him outside the hollow of his subjective universe. All that is needed is his willingness to leave himself. We are all prisoners. But we sit on the keys.

From: Bringing Heaven Down to Earth by Tzvi Freeman – tzvif@aol.com