Monthly Archives: September 2017

THE TANYA (Wikipedia)

Opening the Tanya: Discovering the Moral and Mystical Teachings of a Classic Work of Kabbalah

Baraita (Aramaic: ברייתא “external” or “outside”; 

pl. Barayata or Baraitot

also BaraithaBeraitaAshkenaziBeraisa) designates a tradition in the Jewish oral law not incorporated in the Mishnah. “Baraita” thus refers to teachings “outside” of the six orders of the Mishnah. Originally, “Baraita” probably referred to teachings from schools outside of the main Mishnaic-era academies – although in later collections, individual Baraitot are often authored by sages of the Mishna (Tannaim).

Tanya (Hebrewתניא‎) is an early work of Hasidic philosophy, by Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi, the founder of Chabad Hasidism, first published in 1797. Its formal title is Likkutei Amarim (ליקוטי אמרים‎, Hebrew, “collection of statements”), but is more commonly known by its opening word, Tanya, which means “it was taught in a beraita“. 

It is composed of five sections that define Hasidic mystical psychology and theology as a handbook for daily spiritual life in Jewish observance.

The Tanya is the main work of the Chabad philosophy and the Chabad approach to Hasidic mysticism, as it defines its general interpretation and method. The subsequent extensive library of the Chabad school, authored by successive leaders, builds upon the approach of the Tanya. Chabad differed from “Mainstream Hasidism” in its search for philosophical investigation and intellectual analysis of Hasidic Torah exegesis. This emphasised the mind as the route to internalising Hasidic mystical dveikus (emotional fervour), in contrast to general Hasidism’s creative enthusiasm in faith. As a consequence, Chabad Hasidic writings are typically characterised by their systematic intellectual structure, while other classic texts of general Hasidic mysticism are usually more compiled or anecdotal in nature.

As one of the founding figures of Hasidic mysticism, Schneur Zalman and his approach in the Tanya are venerated by other Hasidic schools, although they tend to avoid its meditative methods. In Chabad, it is called “the Written Torah of Hasidus”, with the many subsequent Chabad writings being relatively “Oral Torah” explanation. In it, Schneur Zalman brings the new interpretations of Jewish mysticism by the Baal Shem Tov, founder of Hasidism, into philosophical articulation and definition. This intellectual form synthesises Hasidic Divine Omnipresence and Jewish soulfulness with other historical components of Rabbinic literature, embodied in the TalmudMedieval philosophyMusar (ethical) literature and Lurianic Kabbalah. The Tanya has therefore been seen in Chabad as the defining Hasidic text, and a subsequent stage of Jewish mystical evolution.[1]

Background to the Chabad approachEdit

The Tanya deals with Jewish spiritualitypsychology and theology from the point of view of Hasidic philosophy and its inner explanations of Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism). It offers advice for each individual on how to serve God in their daily life.

Early Hasidic movementEdit

The first few generations of the Hasidic movement established the various approaches of its different schools. The third generation great students of Dov Ber of Mezeritch, who spread out across Eastern Europe, became the leaders of Hasidism in Ukraine, Poland, Hungary and Russia. Among them, Schneur Zalman articulated a different approach to Hasidic Philosophy from general Hasidism. The founding Hasidic mysticism of the Baal Shem Tov, and subsequent Hasidic Masters, emphasised the emotions of dveikus to cleave to the Omnipresent Divine. The intellectual (“Chabad”) approach of Schneur Zalman, continued by successive Lubavitch Rebbes, emphasised the mind as the route to the inner heart. The Chabad school requires knowledge of Godliness, drawn from Hasidic Philosophy, to establish Hasidic mystical faith. This enabled Schneur Zalman to take Hasidus to Lithuanian Jews from nearby White Russia, and aroused the opposition of their early leaders. In this, Chabad is a separate offshoot of general Hasidism, and to its students is the profound fulfillment of systematically articulating its inner depths. Therefore, in Chabad, the Baal Shem Tov and Schneur Zalman, who share the same birthday, are called the “two great luminaries” (after Genesis 1:16, according to the Midrashic account, before the moon was diminished), representing heart and mind.

Kabbalah and HasidismEdit

The historical development of Kabbalah, from the 12th century, and its new formulations in the 16th century, explained the subtle aspects and categories of the traditional system of Jewish metaphysicsHasidic spirituality left aside the abstract focus of Kabbalah on the Spiritual Realms, to look at its inner meaning and soul as it relates to man in this World.[2] The founder of Hasidism, the Baal Shem Tov, brought the Kabbalistic idea of Omnipresent Divine immanence in Creation into daily Jewish worship of the common folk. This enabled the popularisation of Kabbalah by relating it to the natural psychological perception and emotional dveikus (fervour) of man. The mystical dimension of Judaism became accessible and tangible to the whole community. Outwardly this was expressed in new veneration of sincerity, emphasis on prayer and deeds of loving-kindness. The unlettered Jewish folk were cherished and encouraged in their sincere simplicity, while the elite scholars sought to emulate their negation of ego through study of Hasidic exegetical thought. Hagiographic storytelling about Hasidic Masters captured the mystical charisma of the tzaddik. The inner dimension of this mystical revival of Judaism was expressed by the profound new depth of interpretation of Jewish mysticism in Hasidic philosophy. Great scholars also followed the Baal Shem Tov as they saw the profound meanings of his new teachings. The Baal Shem Tov’s successor Dov Ber of Mezeritch became the architect of the Hasidic movement, and explained to his close circle of disciples the underlying meanings of the Baal Shem Tov’s explanations, parables and stories.

ChabadEdit

Mind versus heart. Among Dov Ber’s disciples, Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi formed Hasidic Philosophy into a profound intellectual system, called “Chabad” after the Kabbalistic terms for the intellect, that differs from mainstream Hasidic emotional approaches to mystical faith. This seeks inward Jewish observance, while downplaying charismatic Hasidic enthusiasm, that it sees as external. The mysticism of Schneur Zalman did not seek cold intellectual investigation. In common with all of Hasidism, it awakens joy and negation of self-awareness, from the Jew’s perception of the Divine in all things. But in Chabad, later to be called after its Russian village of Lubavitch, external emotional expression is seen as superficial if devoid of inner contemplation. In this vein, it is related that the second Lubavitch Rebbe, Dov Ber Schneuri, would pray motionless for hours. Emotional expression was replaced with inner, hidden emotional ecstasy from his intellectual contemplation of Hasidic Philosophy during prayer. At the end of praying, his hat and clothing would be soaked in perspiration. Typically, he wrote one of the most personal mystical accounts in Judaism, his “Tract on Ecstasy”, that instructs the Chabad follower in the levels of contemplation. This explains his father’s concept of the Chabad articulation of Hasidism. While the Baal Shem Tov stressed the heart, Schneur Zalman stressed the mind, but it was a warm, fiery mystical intellectualism.

Intellect versus faith. By giving Hasidus philosophical investigation, the Chabad school explained the inner meanings of the “Torah of the Baal Shem Tov”. Its systematic investigation enables the mind to grasp and internalize the transcendent spirituality of mainstream Hasidism. If the mind can bring the soul of Hasidism into understanding and knowledge through logic, then its effects on the person can be more inward. The classic writings of other Hasidic schools also relate the inner mysticism of Hasidic Philosophy to the perception of each person. The aim of the Hasidic movement is to offer the Jewish mystical tradition in a new, internal form that speaks to every person. This would awaken spiritual awareness and feeling of God, through understanding of its mystical thought. Mainstream Hasidism relates this mystical revival through charismatic leadership and understanding based faith. The path of Schneur Zalman differs from other Hasidism, as it seeks to approach the heart through the development of the mind. Chabad writings of each generation of its dynasty, develop this intellectual explanation of Hasidic mystical ideas, into successively greater and more accessible reach. In recent times the last two Rebbes expressed the spiritual warmth of Chabad in terms of daily reality, language and relevance, in the Yiddish translations and memoires of Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn, and especially the Likkutei Sichos of Menachem Mendel Schneerson.

Chabad Hasidus and other dimensions of Jewish thought. Because the approach of Chabad explains Hasidus in intellectual form, it can incorporate into its explanation the other aspects of historical Jewish thought. Complimentary or initially contradictory explanations of Jewish thought from Rabbinic JudaismJewish Philosophy and Kabbalah can become synthesised into one unity. It can connect the different disciplines of mysticism (Kabbalah) and Jewish philosophy (Hakira), by relating to a higher, essential unity in Divinity, that harmonises diverse ideas. This approaches classic questions of theology from a different route than Hakira. The Jewish philosophers of the Middle Ages, such as Maimonides, reconciled Judaism with Greek philosophy. Their explanations of the nature of the Divine, are related from man’s independent understanding from first principles. Hasidic thought looks to the inner meaning of Kabbalah, a conceptual system of metaphysics from mystical encounters with revelation. The insights it brings to theological questions, brought out in its Chabad explanation, are related from a mystical, higher reality “from above”. When Hasidic thought addresses traditional questions, such as Divine Providenceimmanence and transcendence, it offers “Inner Torah” explanations of spirituality, that can also be harmonised with the explanations of the “Revealed Torah”. It is the ability of Hasidic thought to bring the abstract, esoteric systems of Kabbalah into conscious perception and mystical faith, by relating them to man’s inner psychological awareness. The ideal of the Chabad approach is to articulate this spiritual perception in terms of man’s understanding and knowledge.[3]

StructureEdit

Rabbi Shneur Zalman legendarily published his Likkutei Amarim anonymously in 1797. Later editions incorporated additional writings by Shneur Zalman. The latest version of this work, dating from 1814,[citation needed] consists of five parts:

  1. Sefer shel Beinonim (“The Book of the Average Men”). This book is a Hasidic guide to the psychological drama of daily Jewish spiritual life. It describes how contemplating the mystical greatness of the Creator and the union that a Jew has with Him through the Torah’s commandments, can achieve the love and fear of God necessary for sincere worship. This approach is the fundamental theme of Chabad teaching: to achieve emotional refinement during prayer and Jewish observance. However, in the path offered, this emotion must stem from intellectual understanding of Hasidic mysticism. That is why this approach and the movement are called Chabad, after the three intellectual Sephirot (God’s emanations in Kabbalah): Chochmah (Wisdom), Binah (Understanding), Da’at (Knowledge). A Hasidic psychology of a Jew’s two souls[4] is investigated, the Divine soul and the Natural soul. The Divine soul is a true “part of God”, a historic emphasis in Jewish thought, though based on earlier sources. The book’s guidance is for the intermediate person who is tempted by natural instincts, while the service of the true tzaddik in mystical thought is transcendent and only involved with holiness.
  2. Sha’ar ha-Yichud ve’ha’Emunah (“The Gateway of Unity and Belief”). This book outlines the theological background to the first section’s Hasidic life. It is an investigation of the meaning of God’s Unity in Hasidism. The Panentheism (all creation takes place “within God”) taught by the Baal Shem Tov is systematically articulated in Kabbalistic philosophy. God is all, but all is not God. Two levels of God’s Unity are both paradoxically true, based on the Kabbalistic doctrine of the Tzimtzum. In the “Lower Unity” all Creation is nullified to God. In the “Higher Unity”, Creation is an acosmic illusion as only God truly exists. The apparent plurality in Creation is only an effect of the concealments of Divinity. The origin of everything is nullification within the Divine Unity.
  3. Iggeret HaTeshuvah (“Letter of Repentance”). This gives the Hasidic interpretation and Chabad method of Teshuvah (Return to God). This section is also known as the “Tanya Katan” (“Brief Tanya”) as it is the gateway to all personal spiritual redemption. It describes the mystical return that not only leads to forgiveness for the sins but can fully enable the repenting person to be elevated to a spiritual place that is higher than where they were before the sin. In Hasidism any spiritual descent is only a preparation for a higher ascent. Two levels of Teshuvah are described, based on their meanings in Kabbalah. The “Lower Teshuvah” redeems sin. The “Higher Teshuvah” brings constant elevation unconnected to sin. Because of this, the founder of Hasidism taught that even saintly tzadikim are able to be inspired to do Teshuvah.
  4. Iggeret HaKodesh (“Letter of Holiness”). This section was not published until 1814, after Rabbi Shneur Zalman’s passing. It is a collection of letters which the author wrote to his disciples and different Hasidic communities, in which he talked about mystical aspects of certain commandments, such as charity, Torah study, or in general all commandments concerned with physical deed. Today it is used as a source of certain in-depth concepts of the “Written Hasidism” not concerned specifically with emotion felt during service or repentance. It is a more esoteric and detailed work of Kabbalistic commentary than the previous sections. Schematically it would relate to a person who had internalised the fundamental first three sections, and could progress higher.
  5. Kuntres Acharon (“Last Thesis”). This section was not published until 1814, after Rabbi Shneur Zalman’s passing. It is also a series of letters in which the author resolved certain seeming controversies in Kabbalah. This section is an even more in-depth investigation of profound mystical notions than the previous one. Like the fourth section, it can be seen as an addition to the first three fundamental sections.

In general, the first book is a universal Jewish guidebook to avodah, everyday Divine service, through Schneur Zalman’s innovative system, applying Jewish mysticism step-by-step to the internal drama of human psychology. As a formative approach guidebook in Judaism, the English translator of the first section, in his introduction, compares its position with Maimonides’ Guide for the Perplexed, but contrasts the spiritual guidance aim of Tanya with the philosophical aim of Maimonides. The second section’s philosophical exposition of Hasidic mystical Panentheism is the underlying foundation for contemplation methods in the first part, and gives the theoretical definition of Hasidism’s theology of God. The third section guides individuals in a Habad Hasidic approach to repentance, to be able to prepare more deeply for the first part’s guidance. The last two added sections give more complicated and in-depth Hasidic exposition of Kabbalistic concepts, the author uniting abstract ideas with the importance of everyday service and an emotion that must accompany it. These discourses are similar to the exegetical commentaries of Schneur Zalman in his other works, though here they sometimes take the form of letters to his followers, with more direct advice.

Subject matterEdit

Most of the work’s first part, “The Book of the Average Man”, the beinoni, serves as a fundamental and basic guide to the spiritual service of God.

Unlike other early Hasidic works, this book is not a collection of sermons or stories, but rather a systematic exposition of Shneur Zalman’s philosophy. Lubavitcher Hasidim are enjoined to study from this work each day as part of Chitas – an acronym for ChumashTehillim and Tanya. The Rebbes of Chabad taught that it is a sacred duty to publish and distribute this book as widely as possible.

The Tanya seeks to demonstrate to the “average” Jewish man or woman that knowledge of God is there for the taking, that spiritual growth to ever higher levels is real and imminent, if one is willing to engage in the struggle.[5] Although many view the Tanya as a work of explanation on Kabbalah or Jewish mysticism, its approbations make clear that Tanya is first and foremost a book of advice in the practical service of God.

Levels of divine serviceEdit

The Tanya describes five levels:

  • The complete tzaddik (“righteous person”) has transformed his animal soul completely, to the point that it is able to reach intense Godly delight in its connection to Godliness, and is disgusted by all worldly pleasures.[6]
  • The incomplete tzaddik no longer desires evil in a way that will be externally expressed, even on the level of thought; however, a minute amount of desire for very subtle evil remains.[6]
  • The beinoni (lit. “intermediate one”) possesses an animal soul that still desires evil, but he succeeds at constantly restraining himself from sin in action, speech, and even thought; this, however, requires ongoing tension and struggle. This struggle is not simply the confrontation between good and evil, but rather the ongoing encounter between one’s two souls – the animal and the divine – the soul that draws downward toward the earth, and the soul that aspires upward toward Hashem.[7]
  • The incomplete rasha (“evil person”) has committed sin without doing teshuva, but does good deeds as well.[8]
  • The total rasha has sinned so frequently that none of his thought, speech, or action are controlled by the divine soul (though it remains in an “external” state of makkif attached to him), and he is exclusively controlled by his animal soul.[8]

Jewish criticismEdit

The Tanya’s concept of two souls, and the statement that the souls of the Gentile nations of the world are different from those of Jewish souls (emanating instead from the realm of evil), have been controversial. Various writers have asserted that this idea has the potential to either develop into or to provide support for racism,[9] or that it endorses a kind of “metaphysical racism”,[10] or that it is “a dangerous and indeed racist idea and contrary to normative Jewish belief.”[11]

The description in the Tanya of soul differences follows on from a particularist-universalist debate in Judaism concerning the meaning of Jews as a chosen people. Among Medieval Jewish philosophyYehudah Halevi follows a proto-kabbalistic approach that distinguishes Jewish and Gentile souls, while Maimonides describes a universalist rationalist approach. Kabbalistic mysticism follows Halevi, developed in Hasidism. However, non-literalist, universalist readings have been found among Kabbalists and Hasidim. In normative Chabad, righteous Gentiles have souls similar in Divine receptivity to Jewish souls, while Jews can be distanced from Divine consciousness. Consequently, the Tanya has been read as describing two universal levels of psychological consciousness.[citation needed]

ExpositionEdit

In Chabad, the Tanya is said to be the Written Torah of Hasidic philosophy, for it is the first work of Hasidic philosophy recorded by its own author, in contrast to the works of the Ba’al Shem Tov and the Maggid of Mezritch, whose words were transcribed by their disciples.[12] This implies that the teachings of Hasidic philosophy in general are all an exposition of the Tanya, just as the Torah teaches that the entire purpose of the Oral Torah is to elucidate the Written Torah.

In his preface to the Tanya, the author writes that anyone with questions about the meaning or application of the Tanya’s guidance should approach “the great ones in his city.” In Chabad Hasidic parlance such a guide is known as a Mashpia. Such a person is trained by his predecessors in correct application of the Tanya.

Many works have been written explaining the Tanya, in particular: the Lubavitcher Rebbe’s Reshimos on the TanyaHaLekach VehaLibuvShiu’rim BeSefer HaTanya (in its English translation, known as “Lessons in Tanya”),[13] Maskil Le’EisanBiurei Ha’Tanya, and “Opening The Tanya,” “Learning the Tanya,” and “Understanding the Tanya” by Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz.

AphorismsEdit

“Our understanding in Tanya is like a goat looking at the moon”–Rabbi Sholom Dovber Schneersohn.[14]
“It is a wonder that Schneur Zalman of Liadi has managed to put such a great God into such a small book”- Rabbi Zusha of Hanipol
“With the Tanya the Jewish people will go to greet the Messiah”–Rabbi Levi Yitzchak of Berditchev

See alsoEdit

Topics:

Influences:

Commentary:

  • Dovber Schneuri differentiated between general Hasidic emotional “enthusiasm” and the Habad ideal of intellectually formed “ecstasy”
  • Sholom Dovber Schneersohn advocated the use of pilpul in expounding Hasidic thought

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “Five Stages in the Historical Development of Kabbalah” from http://www.inner.org. “The Development of Kabbalah in Light of Its Main Texts. In this lecture, the five major texts of Kabbalah (Sefer YetzirahZoharPardes RimonimEitz Chayim, and Tanya) are the focus of a summary of its development over the ages”. Retrieved Nov. 2009
  2. ^ Overview of Chassidut from http://www.inner.org. Retrieved Nov. 2009
  3. ^ Overview of recent academic study of Habad philosophy (“Contemporary Habad and the Paradox of Redemption” by Naftali Loewenthal, in Perspectives on Jewish thought and mysticism) Google books. Retrieved Nov. 2009
  4. ^ and souls [which] I have made Isaiah 57:16
  5. ^ The Aleph Society, promoting the educational efforts of Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz. | Preface to Rabbi Steinsaltz’s Commentary on Tanya
  6. a b Tanya, Likkutei Amarim, ch. 10
  7. ^ Tanya, Likkutei Amarim, ch. 12
  8. a b Tanya, Likkutei Amarim, ch. 11
  9. ^ Raphael Jospe (1997). Paradigms in Jewish philosophy Pg 118. Associated University Presses, Inc. Retrieved 16 August 2011.
  10. ^ Rabbi Geoffrey W. Dennis. The encyclopedia of Jewish myth, magic and mysticism Pg 254. Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd. Retrieved 16 August 2011.
  11. ^ Alan Silver (2008). Jews, myth and history : a critical exploration of contemporary Jewish belief Pg 127. Troubador Publishing Ltd. Retrieved 16 August 2011.
  12. ^ See the Holy Letters of Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok Schneersohn, Vol. IV, p. 261 ff.
  13. ^ Lessons in Tanya
  14. ^ Shemu’os Vesippurim, Refoel Kahn, vol. 1, p. 96

Further readingEdit

  • HaRav Shneor Zalman of Liadi, Tanya: Likutei Amarim: Sefer Shel Benonim (It was taught, Collected Sayings: Book of Intermediates) with added notes explaining the Mystical concepts by Rabbi Nissan Mindel PH.D.& Rabbi Ya’acov Immanuel Schochet, Bi-Lingual Hebrew-English edition, Kehot Publishing.com
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SOMEBODY NEEDS A SERIOUS VACATION

​THE WHITEHOUSE POST 

“[Jared] Kushner has been criticized in the past for initially not disclosing more than 100 contacts with foreign leaders including those from Russia, as well as ownership of a multimillion dollar tech company with links to Goldman Sachs and businessmen Peter Thiel and George Soros. Kushner was also one of three top campaign officials or surrogates who failed to disclose a June 2016 meeting with a woman billed as being with the Russian government and having incriminating information on Hillary Clinton.” —CNN, Sept. 28

Jared here. Sorry about forgetting to tell you about my private email account, senators!

In general, I apologize if, on a form, I forgot to disclose anything about myself, or, indeed, everything about myself. I just have this condition where the second I am presented with a form for making disclosures, I lose all recollection of who I am, what I am doing and the meaning of the word “disclosure.” It sounds like something that a bank should do to a poor family. Boy, I hope I’m not poor! I assume I’m not, based on these cuff links I’m wearing, but I honestly don’t know! The second I was asked to supply information about myself, my condition kicked in.

Have we met before?

I am not trying to be rude. It’s just that apparently I’ve met like a whole BUNCH of Russian officials, and I have zero recollection of any of this. Or, like, any income I’ve received at any time. Or most of my business holdings. Looking at my fine-tailored suit, I assume I must have business holdings. I can’t wait to find out what they are! I hope they don’t involve a complex web of business dealings with hostile nations. That could be awkward.

You know that thing where you can’t remember your password and the hint seems as though it was written by an entirely different person? I have that, but also for the email address itself and for having created the email. Do I have an email address? What’s an email address? No, genuinely, what is an email address?

I’m sorry. I should have mentioned this to Congress earlier, really, but, again, the second I am presented with a form to fill out, my mind goes blank, and so does the form. Who am I? What am I doing here? Am I qualified to be here? Should I be here? Why was I chosen to be a presidential adviser? Do I have any expertise at all in anything? Good questions, all equally difficult to answer.

Oh my God, I’ve been filling the form out with the wrong end of the pencil, haven’t I? Oops.

Read These Comments

The best conversations on The Washington Post

They tell me that this woman is my wife and that I am a senior adviser to the president. Senior adviser — wow! Good for me.

I would tattoo personal information on my hands for ease and convenience, but tattoos are lower-class and somehow I know that whatever else I may turn out to be, I am not that. I feel as though I own something made of marble, maybe a building. Or a boat, the kind with costly silent consonants in it. I bet I went to Harvard, whatever that is.

Am I male or female? Well, it’s a 50/50 shot here, at least according to this form’s restrictive binary. Boy, I hope I’m male, just based on, like, society. I’ll pick one at random.

Have I been here before? Should I be talking to you? Who am I? Is this all a nightmare? Or, wait, am I a goldfish? Is there anything else I am failing to disclose? Maybe. Who can say? I certainly can’t.

I bet I know a lot about the Middle East, though. Definitely put me in charge of that

THE BOOK OF TANYA 9/28/2017

THE BE GOOD TANYA’S SONG 

https://youtu.be/-0SmXVrLlZ4



THE BE GOOD TANYA SONG 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Be_Good_Tanyas

 


e Flight Up is an album by American jazz saxophonist Dexter Gordon recorded in 1964 in Paris and released on the Blue Note label.[2]

One Flight Up
One Flight Up.jpg
Studio album by Dexter Gordon
Released Mid September 1965[1]
Recorded June 2, 1964
CBS Studios, Paris
Genre Jazz
Length 37:05 original LP
48:07 CD reissue
Label Blue Note
BST 84176
Producer Francis Wolff
Dexter Gordon chronology
Our Man in Paris
(1963)
One Flight Up
(1964)
Clubhouse
(1965)

ReceptionEdit

The Allmusic review by Michael G. Nastos awarded the album 3½ stars stating “One Flight Up stands as a testament to Dexter Gordon’s viability as a bandleader and teammate, while his individualism is somewhat sublimated. It’s a good listen to digest all the way through, especially if you are as patient as the performers, who have a lot to say”.[3]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 3.5/5 stars[3]
The Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide 4/5 stars[4]

Track listingEdit

All compositions by Dexter Gordon except as indicated.
  1. “Tanya” (Donald Byrd) – 18:18
  2. “Coppin’ the Haven” (Kenny Drew) – 11:17
  3. Darn That Dream” (Eddie DeLangeJimmy Van Heusen) – 7:30
  4. “Kong Neptune” – 11:02 Bonus track on CD reissue

SILENCE DURING MEDJUGORJE 

http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/commentandblogs/2017/09/29/medjugorje-and-migration-sometimes-its-best-the-church-stays-silent/

WAYSEER SONG (Ancient Priesthood) 

THE BOOK OF TANYA 

http://www.chabad.org/library/tanya/tanya_cdo/aid/1028862/jewish/Tanya.htm

THE BOOK OF TANYA 

Tishrei 8, 5778 · 09/28/2017
“Today’s Day”

Thursday

Tishrei  85704 Torah
 lessons:Chumash: B’racha, Chamishi with Rashi.Tehillim: 44-48. Also 109-111.
Tanya: 

 Furthermore, (in addition (p. 507)..malchut of Atzilut) (p. 509).
A resume of the fifth method:
H – Hatznei’a…, “Walk discreetly with your G-d,”1. One must take care not to be conspicuous or ostentatious in the slightest. It is said “Man should always be artful in piety.”2 The artfulness lies in seeing that his piety not be noticed at all.

 We know that a number of the early chassidim concealed their true selves, and when discovered were sincerely distressed. This is the avoda of teshuva that comes from hatznei’a lechet, being discreet.

Tanya

Page issues

Tanya Rabbati, a 16th-century Italian code of Jewish law, is an unrelated work with a similar name. For other uses, see Tanya (disambiguation).

Edition of the Tanya printed in Fayid from 1974. The 7th leader of Chabad encouraged new printings to be made in remote places.

The Tanya (Hebrewתניא‎) is an early work of Hasidic philosophy, by Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi, the founder of Chabad Hasidism, first published in 1797. Its formal title is Likkutei Amarim (ליקוטי אמרים‎, Hebrew, “collection of statements”), but is more commonly known by its opening word, Tanya, which means “it was taught in a beraita“. It is composed of five sections that define Hasidic mystical psychology and theology as a handbook for daily spiritual life in Jewish observance.

The Tanya is the main work of the Chabad philosophy and the Chabad approach to Hasidic mysticism, as it defines its general interpretation and method. The subsequent extensive library of the Chabad school, authored by successive leaders, builds upon the approach of the Tanya. Chabad differed from “Mainstream Hasidism” in its search for philosophical investigation and intellectual analysis of Hasidic Torah exegesis. This emphasised the mind as the route to internalising Hasidic mystical dveikus (emotional fervour), in contrast to general Hasidism’s creative enthusiasm in faith. As a consequence, Chabad Hasidic writings are typically characterised by their systematic intellectual structure, while other classic texts of general Hasidic mysticism are usually more compiled or anecdotal in nature.

As one of the founding figures of Hasidic mysticism, Schneur Zalman and his approach in the Tanya are venerated by other Hasidic schools, although they tend to avoid its meditative methods. In Chabad, it is called “the Written Torah of Hasidus”, with the many subsequent Chabad writings being relatively “Oral Torah” explanation. In it, Schneur Zalman brings the new interpretations of Jewish mysticism by the Baal Shem Tov, founder of Hasidism, into philosophical articulation and definition. This intellectual form synthesises Hasidic Divine Omnipresence and Jewish soulfulness with other historical components of Rabbinic literature, embodied in the TalmudMedieval philosophyMusar (ethical) literature and Lurianic Kabbalah. The Tanya has therefore been seen in Chabad as the defining Hasidic text, and a subsequent stage of Jewish mystical evolution.[1]

Baraita (Aramaic: ברייתא “external” or “outside”; pl. Barayata or Baraitot; also BaraithaBeraitaAshkenaziBeraisa) designates a tradition in the Jewish oral law not incorporated in the Mishnah. “Baraita” thus refers to teachings “outside” of the six orders of the Mishnah. Originally, “Baraita” probably referred to teachings from schools outside of the main Mishnaic-era academies – although in later collections, individual Baraitot are often authored by sages of the Mishna (Tannaim).

According to Maimonides (Introduction to Mishna Torah), the baraitot were compiled by Rabbi Hoshaya and Bar Kappara, although no compilation was passed down to us like the Tosefta was.

Because the Mishnah encapsulates the entire Oral Law in a purposely compact form (designed to both facilitate and necessitate oral transmission), many variant versions, additional explanations, clarifications and rulings were not included in the Mishnah. These were later compiled in works called the “Baraitot” – often in the form of a list of teachings by one sage. “Baraita” can thus also designate collections of such traditions. The main collections of Baraita are the Tosefta and the Halakhic Midrashim (Mekhilta, Sifra and Sifre).

The authority of the Baraita is somewhat less than that of the Mishnah. Nevertheless, these works are the basic “proof-text” cross-referenced by the Talmudic sages in their analysis and interpretation of the Mishna; See Gemara. Here, a teaching from the Baraita is usually introduced by the Aramaic word “Tanya” (“It was orally taught”) or by “Tanu Rabanan” (“Our Rabbis have orally taught”), whereas “Tnan” (“We have orally taught”) introduces quotations from the Mishnah. Anonymous Baraitot are often attributed to particular Tannaim by the Talmud. In the Jerusalem Talmud, references to Baraitot are less common.

The style of the Baraita is basically indistinguishable from that of the Mishna, but some come closer to Mishnaic idiom than others. For example, the second chapter of Kallah Rabbathi, a beraita compilation, is often appended to Pirkei Avoth, as both are similar in style and content.

ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH CHANGES 

 http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/issues/september-29th-2017/is-rome-changing-course-on-medjugorje/

INVESTIGATING MEDJUDGORJE 

http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/news/2017/08/22/vatican-investigator-all-indications-medjugorje-could-be-approved-this-year/

COLOSUS & PLEIADES

 

 The Troilus and Cressida Puzzle

PART II

by


Mather Walker
(Summer 2006)

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Contemporary time is married to the clock, but time in antiquity time was married to the heavens. In early spring, the benevolent constellation of Bootes, the herdsman, with the red star Arcturus, blazing at his heels rose just after sunset reminding people below that it was time to release the cattle from their winter rest. In early fall, the Pleiades signaled the changing season, and next Orion, the hunter rose with the first frost. The astronomical content of Homer’s description of Achilles’ Shield in the Iliad, for example, was essentially seasonal. The Pleiades, the Hyades, and Orion signified through their sequential heliacal risings the period from May to November when the major agricultural activities of harvesting, and plowing would take place. Just as Homer had, Bacon incorporated a seasonal design in the plays. The sixth play from the beginning point of The Merry Wives Of Windsor is A Midsummer Nights Dream. Exactly six plays further along is The Winter’s Tale. Various of the other plays are seasonal as well. Romeo and Juliet, for example, is at Lammas Eve, August 1st. Twelfth Night is January 6, and, in The Tempest, written as a preface to the First Folio, not is does the word ‘tempest’ come from a root meaning ‘time’, but the entire play is permeated with allusions to time, and the play itself is set at the equinox.

Bacon also improved on Homer in another feature of his plays. In his book, “Shining in the Ancient Sea The Astronomical Ancestry of Homer’s Odyssey. Laurin R. Johnson supplied evidence that much of the ancient material Homer transmitted came from a distant antiquity in India. Certainly the plot of Cymbeline is based on an ancient story in the Vedanta. In The Tempest two equal periods of twelve years are shown as depicting the twelve year reign of darkness of Sycorax, and the twelve year reign of light of Prospero. Swami Sri Yukteswar says (The Holy Science) that around 700 B.C. a mistake crept into the almanacs of the Hindus. Before that time there existed knowledge of a 24,000 year cycle composed of two equal parts of 12,000 years, which corresponded on that vast scale to the respective 12 hours of light and darkness of the diurnal cycle. By incorporating the two cycles in The Tempest Bacon shows that he was aware of this ancient cycle, and he shows also that he incorporated it in the overall design of the First Folio. By doing this he was able to incorporate a design in his plays that modeled the day, night cycle of all nature, from the diurnal cycle, through the annual cycle to the vast 24,000 year cycle.

The 24 ‘books’ of Homer’s works also conceal another meaning. 24 is the number of letters in the Greek alphabet. Sacred alphabets of antiquity concealed an amazing secret. In India it was claimed that the universe was created with the letters of the language of the gods, Sanskrit. In the Kabala there was a similar claim, but now as regards the letters of Hebrew. Greek was another of these ancient languages that held the same concealed secret. In Greek, unlike Latin, each letter of the alphabet is a word, and the letters of that word comprise a coded narrative giving a meaning, that corresponds somewhat to Bacon’s idea of the “Schematisms of Matter”, regarding the secret structure underlying the visible part of the universe.

 

The first pictograph is followed by which is the first letter without the crossbar. This pictograph shows that the manifested universe begins with unity which then divides into two. The next pictograph depicts the universe “O” as divided into two parts, indicating that the entire universe is divided into the immaterial part (the realm in which resides the blueprint of the material universe) and the realm of materiality. The word alpha then concludes with the initial letter repeated again,- the first and last letters showing the unity divided into two parts, both connected by the crossbar, so that the first and last letters represent the termini, or beginning and end of time in the manifested universe. Each letter in the Greeks alphabet is coded into a sacred narrative in the same manner giving secret information about the schematic of the universe. There is evidence that the Shakespeare plays, in turn, are constructed so that at certain places in the works the Latin letters are mapped into Greek letters which collate this secret information with the text of the works. In correspondence with this, Bacon devised his bi-literal cipher which utilizes the then 24 letters of the English language to convey knowledge concealed within the plays.

The Comedies deal with the intelligible or celestial world in which exists a kind of blueprint for the material world. The Tragedies represent events in the material world (death only occurs in materiality, and is present only in the Tragedies), but they correspond play for play with what exists in the intelligible or celestial world, i.e., Troilus and Cressida is a reflection of The Merry Wives of Windsor; The Tragedy of Coriolanus(Coriolanus who leaves his own country to go into another country, reflects the story of the prodigal son who goes into a far country- materiality) is a reflection of the story of the fallen angels in Measure for Measure, and so on. But the First Folio reflected an even more meticulous and precise design of Homer’s works.

The works of Homer had a very precise pattern in their design. In Shining in The Ancient Sea: The Astronomical Ancestry of Homer’s Odyssey Laurin Johnson notes that the design of the Odyssey is astonishing in its symmetry and complexity. He provided a graphic showing the twelve adventures of the Odyssey arranged around a circle. Each of the twelve adventures on the circle, Johnson said, is mirrored in some way by the adventure opposite:

Land of the Living Cicones Land of the Dead
Lotus Eaters (Losses Memory of the past) Sirens (Gains knowledge of future)
Cyclops (Losses 6 men) Scylla (Losses 6 men)
Aeolia (Falls asleep) Thrinace (Falls asleep )
Laetrygonians (Loses all but one ship) Charybdis (Loses all but himself)
Circle (Stays with her one year) Calypso (Stays with her 7 years)

Both the 12 signs of the zodiac and the 12 months of the year were regarded in ancient times as paired off in two opposite groups of six. Heraclitus believed the twelve children of Aeolus were the twelve months of the year, the six females representing the six months when the earth brings forth its fruits, the six males the months when the seeds are sown. This pattern of two opposite groups of six is present both in the Comedies and in the Tragedies, but the two opposite groups of six have the following special pattern.

They show a descent in six plays and an ascent in the other, parallel six plays. (The famous American seer, Edgar Cayce, described the cycle of the soul, as made up of a descent into matter followed by an ascent from matter.

 

DESCENT ASCENT
The Merry Wives Of Windsor The Winters Tale
Measure For Measure Twelfth Night
The Comedy Of Errors Alls Well That Ends Well
Much Ado About Nothing The Taming of the Shrew
Loves Labor Lost As You Like It
Midsummer Nights Dream The Merchant of Venice

Fourteen years later in 1623, the first edition of the collected works of Mr. William SHAKESPEARES Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies was finally published. Troilus and Cressida was included in the work. However, it was now labeled “The Tragedie Of Troylus and Cressida”, and incorporated some 500 minor changes from the quarto version. It was placed at the beginning of the tragedies in the book, but it was omitted from the table of contents:

Moreover, only the second and third pages were numbered (79 and 80), and the pagination began again with “1”at the beginning of “The Tragedy of Coriolanus”, the second tragedy in the volume, and proceeded normally from there.”

In a fragment from The Styx, a lost work of the Neoplatonist, Porphyry, preserved by Stobaeus, we are told that Homer presents the whole cyclical progress and rotation of transmigration under the allegory of the witch, Circe. “The urge for pleasure makes them long for their accustomed way of life in and through the flesh”, says Porphyry, “and so they fall back into the witch’s brew of genesis. Additional information is given about the descent of souls by Proclus who says that Pythagoras, in his obscure language, called the Milky Way “Hades” and “a place of souls”, for souls are crowded together there. These souls, he tells us, have been contaminated for he says that among some people libations of milk are offered to the gods that cleanse souls.

Thus we see with the witches in The Merry Wives of Windsor the allegory of the fall of souls. The town in the play is actually located in the heavens. When Slender talks with Anne (the moon) her name comes from the original name of the goddess Diana (Di = goddess + Anna) who represents the moon. Mention is made of bears in the town referring to Ursa Major and Ursa Minor. Falstaff, along with the soiled clothing, is thrown into the river Thames, referring to the contaminated souls cast into the river of the Milky Way. At the end of the play Falstaff is made to join the witches in the circle dance around the great oak tree, referring to the dance of souls around the World Tree of the earth before they fall into incarnation in the earth. And, lastly, Falstaff is fitted with stag horns.

Between and slightly above Betelgeuse and Bellatrix, the two stars that mark the shoulders of Orion, is a cluster of three faint stars. In ancient times, one of these had a name meaning, “the head of a stag.” In ancient India this was associated with a story about Prajapati who turned himself into a stag in an attempt to escape Rudra. The later version of the story was about Actaeon , who happened upon the goddess Diana as she was bathing and was turned into a stag by the angry goddess, and was pursued and torn to shreds by his own dogs. The meaning of the story is that Orion once marked the vernal equinox, but over thousands of years sank lower and lower on the eastern horizon at the time of the equinox. So the story became a myth of the descent of souls. And the allegory in The Merry Wives of Windsor where Falstaff is fitted with stag horns has the same symbolic content.

The account so far deals with the drama in the heavens above the earth, but Measure For Measure, which deals with the legend of the fallen angels, takes the drama further toward the actual incarnation of souls in the earth. And The Comedy of Errors deals with the individual soul in its incarnation into the earth. This goes on to the next step with Much Ado About Nothing. Our word personality, the outer aspect of the incarnated soul, comes from a Latin word meaning ‘mask’. In the earth the incarnated soul is concealed behind the mask of the outer self. In Much Ado About Nothing the theme of masks and masquerades plays a large part. The soul in the earth is hidden behind the mask of the persona. At the next lower step of the descent into matter the Labor of Love is lost, and the next, and last step, is the bottom of the descent into the earth. Here is shown the cosmological hierarchy with Bottom the Weaver at the very bottom. Bottom the Weaver has a special significance. He takes part in the small play within the play of Pyramus and Thisby, the drama of the soul trapped in matter communicating with the higher self through the chink in the wall of clay, i.e., the wall of flesh. Bottom the Weaver represents the Cathars who through their ascetic practices had acquired to ability to communicate with their higher selves. The Cathars were weavers, and during the Roman Catholic Albigensian inquisition they were required to wear yellow crosses. So we find Bottom saying he will discharge his part in a beard, if they choose, of your French-crown-color beard, your perfect yellow.

On the ascending side, The Merchant of Veniceincorporates  the Tree of the Sephiroth of the Kabbalah, a cosmological hierarchy corresponding to the cosmological hierarchy of A Midsummer Nights DreamAs You Like It,in turn, is the correspondence to Love’s Labor Lost, but since it is on the ascending side it is actually Love’s Labor Won, as depicted in the lessons of love that Orlando learns from Rosalind. (Francis Meres listed a play by this title among Shakespeare’s works in 1598, and it is known that such a work got into print because it was listed in a bookseller’s catalogue in August 1603.) The only comedies written around this time were Much Ado about Nothing, and As You Like It. The title of Love’s Labor Won was probably changed to As You Like It because the relation with Love’s Labor Lost might have been too revealing.

The Taming of The Shrew corresponds to Much Ado About Nothing, but again, on the ascending side. Whereas in Much Ado About Nothing the soul is hid beyond the mask of self, in The Taming of The Shrew the mask, i.e. the mesh of associative-automation reasoning that masks the true consciousness behind it is tamed. All’s Well That Ends Well corresponds to The Comedy Of Errors. But since All’s Well That Ends Well is on the ascending side, instead of being under the thrall of the witchcraft of materiality, in All’s Well That Ends Well the third eye is found that opens the doorway for the trapped soul to escape the spell of illusion cast on it by the witchcraft of incarnation in matter. The Twelfth Night depicts the two parts of the divine constitution of man ascending from the sea of matter just as Measure For Measure depicted the fallen angels, that is, the souls descending into the sea of matter.

The Winter’s Tale (the twelfth and last comedy) is the story of Persephone, which Sallust said was a sacred myth regarding the descent of souls, but The Winter’s Tale deals mainly with the return of Persephone from Hades. It is set mainly in the spring., and thus deals instead of with the fall of souls, with the ascent of souls. Here also astronomical symbolism is found again as in The Merry Wives of Windsor. Perhaps the most famous of all stages directions is “Exit, pursued by a bear”, where Antigonus lays Perdita down and then is pursued and slain by a bear. This is followed by the Clown with the peculiar stress on the differentiation between the drama taking place in the sea and on the shore:

“Clown: I have seen two such sights, by sea and by land! I am not to say it is a sea, for it is now the sky betwixt the firmament and it you cannot thrust a bodkin’s point.Shepherd: Why, boy, how is it?

Clown : I would you did but see how it chafes, how it rages, how it takes up the shore-but that’s not to the point. O, the most piteous cry of the poor souls! Sometimes to see ’em, and not to see ’em: now the ship boring the moon with her mainmast, and anon swallowed with yeast and froth, as you’d thrust a cork into a hogshead. And then for the land-service: to see how the bear tore out his shoulder bone, how he cried to me for help, and said his name was Antigonus, a nobleman. But to make an end of the ship: to see how the sea flap-dragoned it; but first, how the poor souls roared, and the sea mocked them; and how the poor gentleman roared, and the bear mocked him, both roaring louder than the sea or weather.”

In “Hamlet’s Mill” Santillana and Dechend say,

“First, what was the “earth”? In the most general sense, the “earth” was the ideal plane laid through the ecliptic. The “dry earth,” in a more specific sense, was the ideal plane going through the celestial equator. The equator thus divided two halves of the zodiac which ran on the ecliptic, 23 1/2 degrees inclined to the equator, one half being “dry land” (the northern band of the zodiac, reaching from the vernal to the autumnal equinox), the other representing the “waters below” the equinoctial plane (the southern arc of the zodiac, reaching from the autumnal equinox, via the winter solstice, to the vernal equinox). The terms “vernal equinox,” “winter solstice,” etc., are used intentionally to angular measures, and not with tracts in space.”

What the above drama from the play depict, becomes evident if you divide the globe vertically into the night and day half, and horizontally into the halves of the northern and southern hemispheres, allowing for the slightly skewed declination of the ecliptic. Antigonus is right at the division between the night half and the day half. Ursa Major (the Great Bear) is on dry land (the northern hemisphere) and Argo Navis, the Ship, is near shore, since Argo Navis is located near the beginning of the southern hemisphere. Argo Navis is particularly appropriate in connection with a shipwreck since it appears to have no bow and in the poem by Aratos is depicted as near shore:

“Stern forward Argo by the Great Dog’s tail Is drawn; for hers is not a usual course, But backward turned she comes, as vessels do When sailors have transposed the crooked stern On entering harbor; all the ship is reverse, And gliding backward on the beach it grounds.”

The Winter’s Tale then, is related to The Merry Wives of Windsor by virtue of being it opposite. And The Winter’s Tale is related to Cymbeline because Cymbeline deals with the final part of the story where the soul re-emerges from the material world. Thus Cymbeline is also the direct opposite of the first tragedy Troilus and Cressida. The otherComedies and Tragedies are related in exactly this same way. Comedy 1 is related to comedy 12 as its opposite. Comedy 2 is related to comedy 11 as its opposite, Comedy 3 is related to comedy 10 as its opposite, and so on, and there is a corresponding design in the Tragedies.

The Merry Wives of Windsor is paralleled by Troilus and Cressida, which, dealing with the siege of Troy also deals with the fall of souls. Of the great Neoplatonic philosopher, Proclus, Thomas Taylor, adept in this area of knowledge, says that the eulogium given by Ammonius Hermeas,

“‘that Proclus possessed the power of unfolding the opinions of the ancients, and a scientific judgment of the nature of things, in the highest perfection possible to humanity,’ will be immediately assented by every one, who is an adept in the writing of this incomparable man”.

Almost casually, in the second part of his essay on the Republic, Proclus gave the key to the meaning of the Iliad in the broadest sense, and an interpretation of the myth of the Trojan War. Proclus says

“The myths want to indicate, I believe, through Helen, the whole of that beauty that has to do with the sphere in which things come to be and pass away and that is the product of the demiurge. It is over this beauty that eternal war rages among souls, until the more intellectual are victorious over the less rational forms of life and return hence to the place from which they came.”

The explanation of Proclus has an evident similarity with the myth of the divine child Dionysos, which was presented in The Mysteries of Eleusis. This myth tells how the titans, gathering the substances of space, formed them into a great mirror. Dionysos, looking into the mirror reached his infant hands out toward the beautiful being he saw before him. But the titans moved the mirror further and further away, luring Dionysos away from his heavenly home. Then they fell upon the infant god and torn him into pieces and began to devour him. At this point, Zeus, looking down with his all seeing eye, saw what was taking place. In his anger, Zeus hurled great bolts of lightning at the titans, nor did his wrath subside until only ashes remained of their bodies. From the ashes of the titans arose the race of man, mixed with the portion of the divine Dionysos within them, along with the elements of the titans. Plutarch, in his treatise, On The Eating of Flesh, tells us that the whole story of Dionysos being torn into pieces by the titans, and the subsequent destruction of the titans by Jupiter, was, “A sacred narrative concerning reincarnation.” That is, it was given in the form of a sacred discourse explaining the dramatic presentation at Agra, and signified the descent of souls into matters. There is also an obvious similarity here with the stories of the fallen angels who were also lured by beauty to their fall.

In the Histories, Bacon again improved on Homer’s design. In The Cave of The Nymphs, Porphyry commented on the following 11 lines from the Odyssey:

At the head of the harbor is a slender-leaved olive and nearby it a lovely and murky cave sacred to the mymphs called Naiads. Within are kraters and amphoras of stone, where bees lay up stores of honey. Inside, too, are massive stone looms and there the nymphs weave sea-purple cloth, a wonder to see. The water flows unceasingly. The cave has two gates, the one from the north, a path for men to descend, while the other, toward the south, is divine. Men do not enter by this one, but it is rather a path for immortals.

This embodies a very ancient idea about the descent of souls into the earth, and about the two paths these souls may travel. The Rig Veda refers to these paths, and the Chandogya Upanishad says one path is the “way of the gods”, and the other takes the souls to the moon, where, after the residue of their good works is exhausted, they return to earth again. Plutarch describes this in “The Face In The Orb Of The Moon”. Macrobius in his Commentary on the Dream of Scipio, also speaks of the two paths, one the gate of Cancer through which the souls descend to the earth, and the other the gate of Capricorn through which they ascend again to the celestial sphere from which they came. Macrobius, in agreement with the Hindu scriptures, calls the gate of Capricorn, the portal of the gods, “because through it souls return to their rightful abode of immortality, to be reckoned among the gods”. According to Macrobius after souls enter through the gate of Cancer they fall through the rings of the planets, therefore Bacon had an allegory of the Mysteries of Eleusis ,which incorporated the symbolism of the soul falling through the rings of the seven planets, in The Tempest, and made the histories, which are located between theComedies and the Tragedies in the First Folio,an allegory of  the seven planets :

1. (Saturn) The Life and Death of King John2. (Jupiter) The Life & Death of Richard the Second

3. (Mars) The First Part of King Henry the Fourth

The Second Part of King Henry the Fourth

4. (Sun) The Life of King Henry the Fifth

5. (Venus) The First Part of King Henry the Sixth

The Second Part of King Henry the Sixth

The Third Part of King Henry the Sixth

6. (Mercury)The Life and Death of Richard the Third

7. (Moon) The Life of King Henry the Eighth

A careful examination of the seven histories shows that they symbolize the respective planets. King Henry the Fifth, for example, with it special éclat, is obviously the sun. King John, who cannot enlarge his kingdom, represents Saturn who had his organs of generation severed. And so on with the other Histories.

The design of the First Folio is so meticulous and precise that each and every play has its precise place in this design, and the order of any single play cannot be changed without destroying the design. Having fashioned this design, Bacon then contrived the anomalies associated with Troilus and Cressida so they could prompt those who were familiar with the play to think, and thus allow those capable of piercing the veil to solve the puzzle and discover that the books of Homer lay behind the design of the First Folio, and, following this, discover why Bacon utilized these works, and hence the secret intent behind the entire First Folio.

Certainly, a rationale for the overall design of the plays in the First Folio is a consummation devoutly to be wished, and certainly you wont find a hint of the real meaning of the design in orthodox scholarship. The orthodox viewpoint is represented by from Sidney Lee and Alfred W. Pollard. According to Sidney Lee the plays in the First Folio were printed anyhow as the copy dribbled in from Heminge and Condell. But Alfred W. Pollard stuck in his thumb and pulled out a plum of wisdom that in his own conceit made him a bright boy, proclaiming their arrangement,

“followed the business like principle of displaying their most attractive wares in the most prominent positions”.

This received wisdom regarding the design of the First Folio has fallen like the gentle rain from heaven onto the huddled masses yearning to breathe free below, and the huddled masses have known no better than that it was a rose by some other name. Alas for the poor, deluded, huddled masses. They have no golden door. A golden shower maybe, but no golden door.

Following these edicts from the high potentates of orthodox dogma, countless editors, have felt they had full license to go any way the whim of their fancy moved them, and have produced countless volumes containing the works of Shakespeare with the plays arranged anyway but the original way in which they were originally published. And that original order, which might have struck a spark of light in some mind untrammeled by the orthodox idiocy, has been quite lost, except for those few willing to pay an exorbitant price for a facsimile of the First Folio. Never mind, all of this will sorted out, but first it is necessary to wade through the anomalies and follow the Troilus and Cressida puzzle all the way to its origin in that Enigmatical and Disclosed scheme in the greatest mind this planet has ever produced,- per ardua ad astra!

The main source for the love plot of the play is Chaucer’s masterpiece Troilus and Criseydewhich was fed from the  fountainhead of Great Homer himself in his Iliad. There is evidence that before writing Troilus and Cressida, Bacon had read the Seven Books of the Iliad published by George Chapman in 1598, Chapman’s first installment in his historic translation of Homer’s Iliad (completed in 1611). There are good reasons for believing that Troilus was written between 1598 and 1602, and that the actual date was probably nearer 1602. For example, the Prologue says:

and hither am I come
A prologue arm’d but not in confidence
Of author’s pen or actor’s voice, but suited
In the condition as our argument

And the “prologue arm’d” is obviously a reference to the armed Prologue in Ben Jonson’s Poetaster (1601). Lines written by one I.C. in his Saint Marie Magdalens Conversion (1603) indicates that the play was known to many:

“Of Helen’s rape and Troyes besieged Towne,
Of Troylus faith and Cressida falsitie,”

So it seems evident that the play was written between these two dates, probably in1602. The Merry Wives of Windsor was also written around this time, and, as I have already shown, there is a connection between the two.

-end of Part II-PART III

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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COLOSSUS & PLEIADES


APOLLO SUN GOD TO TWIN ARTEMIS MOON GODDESS 

TWINS!    TWINS!    TWINS!
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_program
It seems that many people misinterpret the true meaning of the Statue of Liberty. They believe it means that the U.S. wants the impoverished, the poorly educated, and the unfortunate of other nations because of the slogan that is implanted on the base of the statue: “Give me your tired, give me your poor, give me your huddled masses.”

Yet that saying was not what the original purpose of the statue was all about. In fact, the original intent of the statue was to give us your folks who are fleeing oppression and we will provide them with an opportunity at a free and successful life. We will give them the opportunity to provide a good life for themselves.

It appears that the “huddled masses” quote was misinterpreted a while back to mean that we want your down trodden, your poor, your unfortunate, your disadvantaged, your uneducated, and we will provide you with a free education, free health care, and allow you to become democrats.

Actually, Emma Lazarus wrote the “huddled masses” poem as part of a campaign to build the pedestal of the statue. The poem was called The New Colossus, and it was written in 1883, and not even inserted onto the pedestal of the statue until 1903 when it was engraved onto the base.

The poem was forgotten and not even a part of the celebration of the opening of the statue in 1883, and it was not until 1903 that it gained much attention outside the original contest to raise money.

In fact, the original intent of the statue had nothing to do with immigration, it had to do with freedom and liberty. France was thanking us for being the first nation ever to make the rulers of their country aware that freedom and liberty was possible. This is ultimately what lead to the French Revolution.

Of course the French Revolution failed because they fought for the rights of man (man as a single entity) while the founders of the U.S. fought for the rights of individual men (we all have inalienable rights that cannot be taken away by anything other than the government).

The reason the statue was build had nothing to do with the Lazarus poem, and yet once again history was twisted so that one group of people who wanted to convince the children of the world the Statue of Liberty was all about immigration. This was all one big lie that was taught in schools since 1903. This was a distortion by the progressives to make you think America was willing to take anyone, from any place in the world or universe.

The truth is, the statue was a celebration of the Declaration of Independence. In fact, we don’t call it the statue of immigration, we call it the statue of liberty. Lady Liberty is stepping forward. She is meant to be carrying the torch of liberty from the United States to the rest of the world.

And in the proceeding years, that is exactly what she did. And she offered her freedom to France and the rest of Europe, and those countries came up with their own form of freedom, and their own interpretation. That’s what other countries do. We have a right to choose our own forms of freedom.

And yet none compare to that of the United States. None. We were the first to establish freedom, we were the first to signs anything like the Declaration of Independence, and we were the first to form a U.S. Constitution that was meant to protect the natural rights of men.

And yet, all these years later, the only country to understand the true meaning of the Declaration of Independence, of the U.S. Constitution, and the Statue of Liberty are those who would consider themselves classical liberals and now conservative or libertarian. The rest of the world has their own skewered interpretation of the true meaning of what kind of freedom we have here in the United States.

Those who intentionally or unintentionally misinterpret the meaning of these great documents, or this great statue, are those who mean to change the United States to be something other than what the founders had intended.

http://bitfighter.org/levels/levels/view/329

PATIENT “17” (movie trailer) 

PATIENT “17” & COLOSSUS

Doctor Roger Lier is a polarizing figure in the world of UFO enthusiasts and the new mystery/documentary, Patient Seventeen, seeks to provide more information about Lier and his beliefs. Roger Leir claims to be a leading surgeon that removes nanotechnology from human beings that were placed in them by aliens from another world and Patient Seventeen looks to verify the authenticity of Leir’s claims through the thought provoking documentary. The real-life Patient Seventeen is a man from Southern California in his forties and he claims that he was visited by aliens when he was a child. Leir recently put him under the knife to remove a metallic object from his calf, which he believes was put there by extraterrestrial beings. The official synopsis for the documentary reads.

“Meet a surgeon who claims to remove highly advanced implants, nanotechnology microchips imbedded by aliens, non-humans monitoring our earth. Discover the world of abductions, scalar wave transmissions, and a program to study or manipulate the human race. Armed with a patient, a scalpel, black lights and a stud finder; we seek to verify the authenticity of this alleged Off-World Implant Technology.”

Filmmaker Jeremy Kenyon Locker Corbell aims to find the truth in Leir’s work and interviews him and Patient Seventeen at length throughout the course of the unsettling movie that is sure to raise a few eyebrows. Patient Seventeen is the latest movie in a series that Corbell calls his “investigative film series” through his Extraordinary Beliefs productions.

A podiatrist by training, from the late 1980s Roger Leir became increasingly involved with his local branch of the Mutual UFO Network (MUFON). Attending one of its conferences in 1995, he was presented with several foot X-rays from a woman who believed that she had been abducted by aliens. Despite Leir’s skepticism, the scans did indicate that there was something in her big toe, and to satisfy his curiosity he offered to operate on her, free of charge. On August 19th, 1995 he extracted two very small foreign objects from the patient, each one metallic in appearance. A second patient underwent surgery that same day for an object about the size of a watermelon seed, between his thumb and index finger.

By the late 1990s, Leir’s findings had established him as a prominent, though controversial, spokesperson for the alien abduction and UFO communities. The Aliens and the Scalpel, detailing his experiences with “implant” surgery, was published in 1999, followed by Casebook: Alien Implants. He made appearances in various television documentaries, including the History Channel’s UFO Hunters, and attended conferences in more than 40 countries. In 2003, he travelled to Varginha, Brazil, to conduct his own research into the alleged crash of an alien craft there seven years previously, an event dubbed “the Brazilian Roswell.” The investigation formed the basis of his final book, UFO Crash in Brazil.

Doctor Roger Leir died in 2014 at the age of 79 and Patient Seventeen aims to dive into his studies that many believe to be completely fabricated. Discover the world of alien abductions in the new trailer from The Orchard’s Patient Seventeen. Armed with a patient, a scalpel, black lights and a stud finder; director Jeremy Kenyon Lockyer Corbell seeks to verify the authenticity of alleged Off-World Implant Technology in this gripping documentary available to own October 10th, and On Demand October 31st. You can check out the trailer c

COLOSSUS 2


This is your brain…this is your brain in drugs…yes, had to go there!
​American Jewish Historical Society.[10]

ContentsEdit

The Colossus of Rhodes, as depicted in an artist’s impression of 1880

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
MOTHER OF EXILES. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.

“Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she
With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

The poem is a Petrarchan sonnet.

The title of the poem and the first two lines refer to the Colossus of Rhodes, which was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, sometimes described as standing astride the harbor.

The “sea-washed, sunset gates” are the mouths of the Hudson and East Rivers, to the west of Brooklyn. The “imprisoned lightning” refers to the electric light in the torch, then a novelty.

The “air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame” refers to New York Harbor between New York City and Brooklyn, which were consolidated into one unit in 1898, 15 years after the poem was written.

The “huddled masses” are the many immigrants coming to the United States (many of them through Ellis Island at the port of New York).

InfluenceEdit

Bronze plaque inside the Statue of Liberty

Paul Auster wrote that “Bartholdi’s gigantic effigy was originally intended as a monument to the principles of international republicanism, but ‘The New Colossus’ reinvented the statue’s purpose, turning Liberty into a welcoming mother, a symbol of hope to the outcasts and downtrodden of the world.”[11]

John T. Cunningham wrote that “The Statue of Liberty was not conceived and sculpted as a symbol of immigration, but it quickly became so as immigrant ships passed under the torch and the shining face, heading toward Ellis Island. However, it was [Lazarus’s poem] that permanently stamped on Miss Liberty the role of unofficial greeter of incoming immigrants.”[12]

The poem has entered the political realm. It was quoted in John F. Kennedy‘s book A Nation of Immigrants (1958)[13] as well as a 2010 political speech by President Obama advocating immigration policy reform.[14] On August 2nd, 2017, the poem and its importance to the Statue of Liberty’s symbolism and thus the effect on American immigration policy, was debated in a White House briefing.

Classical composer David Ludwig has set the poem to music, which was performed at the worship service of President Obama’s 2013 inauguration ceremony.[15]

Author and scholar Julia Gordon-Bramer theorizes that Sylvia Plath’s poem, “Lady Lazarus,” is about the Statue of Liberty and Jewish immigrant poet Emma Lazarus in her book, Fixed Stars Govern a Life: Decoding Sylvia Plath, volume one (2014, Stephen F. Austin State University Press).

Parts of the poem also appear in popular culture. The Broadway musical Miss Liberty, with music and lyrics by Irving Berlin, an immigrant himself, used the final stanza beginning “Give me your tired, your poor” as the basis for a song.[16][13] It was also read in the 1941 film Hold Back the Dawn as well as being recited by the heroine in Alfred Hitchcock‘s wartime film Saboteur.[13] Harpist and singer Joanna Newsom indirectly references the poem in her 2015 song “Sapokanikan,” in contrast to the forbidding colossus of Percy Bysshe Shelley‘s “Ozymandias.”[17] The poem is read aloud in the eponymous episode entitled ‘New Colossus’ in the 2016 Netflix web series The OA.[18]

THE “TRAGIC” END..or is it?

GREGORIAN (She’s Buying her stairway to heaven)

your huddled masses yearning to breathe free meaning
BABYLONIAN BIG EYED GODS OF TODAY?

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
MOTHER OF EXILES. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.

“Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she
With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”


The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!” The title of the poem and the first two lines refer to the Colossus of Rhodes, which was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, sometimes described as standing astride the harbor.

ISOLATION & TRUMP 

Drop the mic…

W

TRAGIC END OF JOAN OF ARC 

let it fall, my heart,

And as it fell you rose to claim it
It was dark and I was over
Until you kissed my lips and you saved me

My hands, they’re strong
But my knees were far too weak
To stand in your arms
Without falling to your feet

But there’s a side to you that I never knew, never knew
All the things you’d say, they were never true, never true
And the games you’d play, you would always win, always win

But I set fire to the rain
Watched it pour as I touched your face
Let it burn while I cry
‘Cause I heard it screaming out your name, your name

When laying with you
I could stay there, close my eyes
Feel you here, forever
You and me together, nothing gets better

Cause there’s a side to you that I never knew, never knew
All the things you’d say, they were never true, never true
And the games you’d play, you would always win, always win

But I set fire to the rain
Watched it pour as I touched your face
Let it burn while I cried
‘Cause I heard it screaming out your name, your name

I set fire to the rain
And I threw us into the flames
Where I felt something die, ’cause I knew that
That was the last time, the last time

Sometimes I wake up by the door
As if that heart you caught is still waiting for you
Even now when it’s already over
I can’t help myself from looking for you

I set fire to the rain
Watched it pour as I touched your face
Let it burn while I cried
‘Cause I heard it screaming out your name


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What’s That Line?

I set fire to the rain
And I threw us into the flames
Where I felt something die
‘Cause I knew that that was the last time, the last time, oh
Oh, oh

Let it burn, oh
Let it burn
Let it burn